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typedef bool (*my_function_f)(int, double);
typedef bool (__stdcall *my_function_f2)(int, double);
//            ^^^^^^^^^

template<class F> class TFunction;

template<class R, class T0, class T1>
class TFunction<R(*)(T0,T1)>
{
  typedef R (*func_type)(T0,T1);
};

int main()
{
  TFunction<my_function_f> t1;  // works on x64 and win32
  TFunction<my_function_f2> t2; // works on x64 and doesn't work on win32

  return 0;
}

The code above gives me the following error in Visual C++ 2010:

1>e:\project\orwell\head\multimapwizard\trunk\externals.cpp(49): error C2079: 't2' uses undefined class 'Externals::TFunction<F>'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              F=Externals::my_function_f2
1>          ]

As you can see the problem with __stdcall modifier. Is this the compiler bug?

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1  
__stdcall: "On Itanium Processor Family (IPF) and x64 processors, __stdcall is accepted and ignored by the compiler", which I guess is why it works 64-bit. –  Rup May 13 '11 at 12:10
    
    
@sehe isn't he already using that syntax? –  Rup May 13 '11 at 12:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

No, this is by design. The calling convention is very much part of the function declaration, your template function uses the default calling convention. Which is not __stdcall unless you compile with /Gz. The default is /Gd, __cdecl.

The code compiles when you target x64 because it blissfully has only one calling convention.

Fix:

template<class R, class T0, class T1>
class TFunction<R (__stdcall *)(T0,T1)>
{
    // etc..
};
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This is because (*) means default calling convention, which is __cdecl.

template<class R, class T0, class T1>
class TFunction<R(*)(T0,T1)>
{
  typedef R (*func_type)(T0,T1);
};

is actually equal to

template<class R, class T0, class T1>
class TFunction<R(__cdecl *)(T0,T1)>
{
  typedef R (__cdecl *func_type)(T0,T1);
};

which, of course, will not match an R(__stdcall *)(T0, T1) on Win32 where __stdcall is not ignored. If you want to partially specialize for function pointers then you will need a partial spec for every calling convention you want to accept.

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You have not specialized your template for the stdcall case, i.e. you need

template<class R, class T0, class T1>
class TFunction<R(__stdcall *)(T0,T1)>
{
  typedef R (*func_type)(T0,T1);
};

Not sure about the syntax, untested, but that should be the issue.

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