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Hey guys,
I am reading these so called non-blocking techniques, but i have few doubts :

1) lock-free operation are performed using atomic operation, now what are these atomic operation ? i mean at certain level they also need to have a lock right ? so Does this lock-free approach provides us locking at finer granularity only ?
2) they say non-blocking list, Now what a non-blocking list should be : if more than one threads comes at the same insertion, only one is going to get succeed, another one will do some other work right ?, but if other thread has no choice except inserting a node then how come it is non-blocking ? won't it will get blocked until previous one is done ??
3) In java, how do they atomic operation ? doesn't they do something like synchronized boolean ..... so how it is lock-free since they are acquiring lock i.e. synchronized section ? 4) CAS is usually used to implement atomic operation. So doesn't cas allow only one operation to happen on the same object , and stops ( block ) others those want to operate on the same object ? Sorry for so many doubts... please clarify...

EDIT what happens when i have a structure to update ? does it also supported by hardware ? No right, So doesn't language would be acquiring locks at some level to make these structure operation atomic ?
About JAVA : there are AtomicReference and AtomicReferenceFieldUpdater class which provides updation to a object ( structure or any kind of object) , so can we compare them in terms of performance i mean speed ? Both in tern uses Unsafe class which uses Native class .

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Non blocking can be a lot faster (magnitudes) in the right situation. I have a skiplist that I made lock free. This is because 99,999 times out of 100,000, no two threads ever try to add to the list at the same time. This is even when running on an SMT system with many threads. The overhead of using a mutex or futex was a waste. I just detect a list change during an attempt to insert or delete....and try again. In our app, this is MUCH faster. There is blocking 1 time per million redos, when the thread changing the list was pre-empted in the change code. –  johnnycrash Jun 15 '11 at 20:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is a simple lock free method in AtomicInteger

public final int getAndIncrement() {
    for (;;) {
        int current = get();
        int next = current + 1;
        if (compareAndSet(current, next))
            return current;
    }
}

You can see that it gets the value, increments it and does a compareAndSwap. If the compareAndSwap doesn't find the expect value, it means another thread has changed the value. So it tries again, and again, until all other threads trying to change the value have done so. This is lock free as no lock is used, but not blocking free as it may have to try again (which is rare) more than once (very rare)


1) lock-free operation are performed using atomic operation, now what are these atomic operation ? i mean at certain level they also need to have a lock right ? so Does this lock-free approach provides us locking at finer granularity only ?

However locks are implemented using more primitive operations. Otherwise you would need a lock to implement a lock adnauseum. The lock free approach uses atomic operations which avoid a full blown lock.

2) they say non-blocking list, Now what a non-blocking list should be : if more than one threads comes at the same insertion, only one is going to get succeed, another one will do some other work right ?,

If its thread safe they should both succeed, one at a time.

but if other thread has no choice except inserting a node then how come it is non-blocking ?

The term is "concurrent". It still has to wait for the other thread to finish, it uses a lock-free approach to do this.

won't it will get blocked until previous one is done ??

yes.

3) In java, how do they atomic operation ?

There is a call native method which performs the atomic operations. You can see this by reading the code. ;) From look at the native code generated, these native method are turned into machine code instructions for performance (rather than being a true method call)

doesn't they do something like synchronized boolean ..... so how it is lock-free since they are acquiring lock i.e. synchronized section ?

No, if you read the code, you would see that it doesn't.

4) CAS is usually used to implement atomic operation. So doesn't cas allow only one operation to happen on the same object ,

No.

and stops ( block ) others those want to operate on the same object ?

No.

Again, if you look at how it is used it may make more sense.

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@peter what about AtomicReferenceFieldUpdater which is provided by java as CAS, so do you think that this can be used as atomic operation ? what i felt about this is : it takes an volatile field to update, so doesn't volatile field reduces the cache capability ? Or there are more native ways ( and can we use them, since unsafe is quite difficult to use ) P.S. I badly need this answer since working on it, so copied from below post ( same comment... ) –  peeyush May 13 '11 at 20:23
    
@peter what happens when i have a structure to update ? does it also supported by hardware ? No right, So doesn't language would be acquiring locks at some level to make these structure operation atomic ? –  peeyush May 13 '11 at 21:38
2  
If you have a structure to update you can still use this approach. However it likely to complicate your code enomously. I suggest you try to get an application which work correctly first and then look at ways to optimise it. It is extreamly rare to have a complex data structure which requires this level of lock free approach. Are you aware that a lock typically takes 1 micro-second? If this is an issue, usually the best solution is to structure your threads so that only one thread manages the data, avoiding the need for locks at all. –  Peter Lawrey May 14 '11 at 8:12
    
why it is rare ? we often use concurrentlinked list like java provide one solution (concurrentlinkedList) but that seems extreme slow to me.. only one thread manages the data , i didn't get that ? we are looking for the solutions for lock, but you are suggesting me to no need of synchronization ( if only one thread is managing data is that dedicate one thread for data and will receive read/write request from all ? ). And i was implementing concurrentHash table but found that in the literature they do claim big improvement ( they always say 90% read, 95% read), but if our writes are much ? –  peeyush May 14 '11 at 9:40
1  
@peeyush, I don't know how your lock free map is better than ConcurrentHashMap, but a 5-10% improvement in a realist application is good. System level calls to the OS are usually very expensive so I would avoid these in any language. Java CAS instructions turns in a single machine instruction (otherwise they would not be atomic) you won't do better in assembly/C/C++ for that bit anyway. –  Peter Lawrey May 14 '11 at 10:03

1) lock-free operation are performed using atomic operation, now what are these atomic operation ?

E.g. incrementing a counter includes

  1. reading the current value,
  2. incrementing the value in memory,
  3. writing back the updated value.

Atomicity means that these all happen as one single, uniterruptible change.

i mean at certain level they also need to have a lock right ?

Wrong. The basic idea behind CAS is to do the first two steps above, then before the third, they check whether the value was changed in between, and fail if so. Then the change may be retried with the new value later.

There is no classical locking involved, as each of the 3 steps in itself is atomic. The 3rd (Compare And Swap) operation is supported by modern processors, so you may say it involves some sort of locking at the register level (to be frank, I don't know how exactly it is implemented), but at any rate, that is not the same as what is generally meant by locking in Java.

The benefit of CAS is improved performance due to the fact that even with the improved locking performance in current JVMs, CAS is still cheaper, especially in case of contention (i.e. when multiple threads do collide upon an operation). In this case, using locks, one or more of the threads are suspended, and a new thread is brought into context instead, which is a very costly operation even when it doesn't involve swapping memory.

2) they say non-blocking list, Now what a non-blocking list should be

Here you may be confusing two different terms. A non-blocking list is one which does not block on insertions/removals, which usually means its size is not bounded (e.g. CopyOnWriteArrayList). Contrast this with e.g. a blocking queue (e.g. ArrayBlockingQueue), which has a fixed maximum size, and upon reaching its size limit, additional insert calls are blocked until more space is available (after some other thread removes element(s) from the queue).

A collection which achieves thread safety using a lock-free algorithm (such as ConcurrentHashMap) is not the same as a non-blocking collection.

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Actually, a LinkedBlockingQueue is also a BlockingQueue and is unbounded, and does not block on insertions. Furthermore, the behavior of the ArrayBlockingQueue on insertions depends on the method used: when full, may return a boolean (offer), may throw an exception (add) or may wait (put). –  Bruno Reis May 13 '11 at 12:44
    
@Bruno, LinkedBlockingQueue is optionally bounded, and it offers both blocking and nonblocking insert/remove methods. –  Péter Török May 13 '11 at 12:49
    
So, the conclusion is that a blocking queue is not necessarily bounded, nor does it necessarily block on insertions, as your answer implies. –  Bruno Reis May 13 '11 at 13:00
1  
@Bruno, terminology is one thing, concrete implementation details are another. Happy nitpicking :-) –  Péter Török May 13 '11 at 13:35
    
@peter what about AtomicReferenceFieldUpdater which is provided by java as CAS, so do you think that this can be used as atomic operation ? what i felt about this is : it takes an volatile field to update, so doesn't volatile field reduces the cache capability ? Or there are more native ways ( and can we use them, since unsafe is quite difficult to use ) ? –  peeyush May 13 '11 at 19:52

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