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I want to ask question about how to call VB.NET DLL from C++ program

I have tried many times to call VB.NET DLL file from C++ and it is working fine but the problem is I can't call the function of VB.NET DLL file ( I can only load the VB.NET DLL file)

in VB.NET DLL I have the following code:

Public Function example_function1(ByVal i As Integer) As Integer
    Return 3

End Function

Public Function example_function2(ByVal i As Integer) As Integer
    Return 3
End Function

============================

My C++ Code is:

    typedef int (__stdcall *ptf_test_func_1_type)(int); 
typedef int (__stdcall *ptf_test_func_2_type)(int*); 
int i =1;

HINSTANCE dll_instance = LoadLibrary("DLLs7.dll");

int main()
{

    if(dll_instance !=NULL)
        {
            printf("The DLLs file has been Loaded \n");
            cout << GetLastError() << endl;

            ptf_test_func_1_type p_func1=(ptf_test_func_1_type)GetProcAddress(dll_instance,"Class1::example_function1");
            ptf_test_func_2_type p_func2=(ptf_test_func_2_type)GetProcAddress(dll_instance,"Class1::example_function2");


            // Function No 1 //

                        if (p_func1 != NULL)
                                 {
                                     cout << "\nThe function number 1 is " << p_func1(i) << endl;

                                }

                        else
                                {
                                    cout << "\nFailed" << endl;
                                    cout << GetLastError() << endl;
                                }

            // Function No 2 //

                        if (p_func2 != NULL)
                                 {
                                     cout << "\nThe function number 2 is" << p_func2(&i) << endl;

                                }

                        else
                                {
                                    cout << "\nFailed" << endl;
                                    cout << GetLastError() << endl;
                                }

        }   
    else
        {
            printf("\nDLLs file Load Error");
            cout << GetLastError() << endl;
        }

        cout << GetLastError() << endl;

    return(0);
}

My following steps is:

1) I have Created VB.NET DLL.

2) I have Created a new application visual C++ and selected "win32 console application"

3) I have written the code to call the DLL and the functions (as you can see in the above)

did I miss anything in the steps or code because I can call VB.NET DLL file but I can't call the VB.NET DLL function

as you can see I have written the GETLASTERRIR() to find the ERROR

cout << GetLastError() << endl;

but I found this Error 127 in function when failed and 203 in the call DLL file

can anyone help me

Thank you very much

Regards

share|improve this question
2  
Error 127 means "The specified procedure could not be found". VB.NET is not capable of exporting functions like this. You will need to use COM (use the <ComVisible(true)> attribute) or write a wrapper class in the C++/CLI language. This glue is needed to get the CLR initialized so your program can execute managed code. –  Hans Passant May 13 '11 at 12:47

4 Answers 4

Since your vb assembly needs a totally different runtime than the 'native' executable, you will need to use some layer in between. This layer may be COM.

You can expose your assembly to the COM subsystem by it's 'ComVisible' property. Then, you should register the assembly to expose it to COM 'subscribers'.

Only then you can #import the assembly namespace from your c++ code.

Note: this is a very brief version of an msdn article "How to call a managed DLL from native Visual C++ code"

EDIT-- Just tried it out... and it seems to work allright:

C# code

namespace Adder
{
    public interface IAdder
    {
        double add(double a1, double a2);
    }
    public class Adder : IAdder
    {
        public Adder() { }
        public double add(double a1, double a2) { return a1 + a2; }
    }
}

Project settings

[assembly: ComVisible(true)]
[assembly: AssemblyDelaySign(false)]

(Signing was needed in order to be able to generate the tlb)

C++ code:

#import <adder.tlb> raw_interfaces_only

  CoInitialize(NULL);
  Adder::IAdderPtr a;
  a.CreateInstance( __uuidof( Adder::Adder ) );
  double d = 0;
  a->add(1.,1., &d); 
  // note: the method will return a HRESULT; 
  // the output is stored in a reference variable.
  CoUninitialize();
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your replay. In short shouldI have tlb file?. because I have only DLL file. –  Hadi Al-Zaabi May 13 '11 at 18:18
1  
@Hadi Al-Zaabi: You should really read the article. RegAsm is the tool you use to create a .tlb file from your assembly. –  xtofl May 13 '11 at 20:36
  • GetProcAddress does not understand C++ name mangling, not to mention any other mangling, so there is no dll for which "Class1::example_function1" could be valid identifier. Normally it's only used with extern "C" (or implemented in C without ++) functions, which are not mangled.
  • If it's implemented in VB.NET, it's not a dll at all. It's a .net assembly and you need to be running in CLR (.net runtime) to use it. You can run C++ code in CLR, but it has to be the "Managed C++", which is extended with special types for .net object references and operation with the garbage collector.
share|improve this answer
    
You cite facts that are related to the topic, and while everything you say is true, it does not answer the question. –  Tamás Szelei May 13 '11 at 14:40
    
Thank you very much for your replay. I have tried on CLR application and the Load of vb.net DLL now it working perfeclty which mean there are no error but the problem also in calling the function. The same problem GeLAst Error is 127. how I use extern "C" in my C++ code?. Regards –  Hadi Al-Zaabi May 13 '11 at 18:20

You can't directly access .NET code from native C++, you will need C++/CLI for that.

If your program needs to be native C++, there is the possibility of writing a mixed-mode wrapper DLL which provides a native C++ interface for the main program, and uses C++/CLI in the implementation to forward calls to the .NET DLL.

share|improve this answer

You would need to write a wrapper on C++/CLI for that . You might find the following link helpful. http://www.codeproject.com/KB/mcpp/cppcliintro01.aspx

share|improve this answer

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