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Can I create a class in VB.NET which can be used from C# like that:

myObject.Objects[index].Prop = 1234;

Sure I could create a property which returns an array. But the requirement is that the index is 1-based, not 0-based, so this method has to map the indices somehow:

I was trying to make it like that, but C# told me I cannot call this directly:

   Public ReadOnly Property Objects(ByVal index As Integer) As ObjectData
        Get
            If (index = 0) Then
                Throw New ArgumentOutOfRangeException()
            End If
            Return parrObjectData(index)
        End Get
    End Property

EDIT Sorry if I was a bit unclear:

C# only allows my to call this method like

myObject.get_Objects(index).Prop = 1234

but not

myObject.Objects[index].Prop = 1234;

this is what I want to achieve.

share|improve this question
    
Default is the keyword that you're missing. Brian's answer has got you covered. –  Cody Gray May 13 '11 at 12:58
    
You are asking for an indexed property, which is a feature not directly available in C#. –  Gabe May 13 '11 at 12:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can fake named indexers in C# using a struct with a default indexer:

public class ObjectData
{
}

public class MyClass
{
    private List<ObjectData> _objects=new List<ObjectData>();
    public ObjectsIndexer Objects{get{return new ObjectsIndexer(this);}}

    public struct ObjectsIndexer
    {
        private MyClass _instance;

        internal ObjectsIndexer(MyClass instance)
        {
            _instance=instance;
        }

        public ObjectData this[int index]
        {
            get
            {
                return _instance._objects[index-1];
            }
        }
    }
}

void Main()
{
        MyClass cls=new MyClass();
        ObjectData data=cls.Objects[1];
}

If that's a good idea is a different question.

share|improve this answer

The syntax is:

Default Public ReadOnly Item(ByVal index as Integer) As ObjectData
  Get
    If (index = 0) Then
      Throw New ArgumentOutOfRangeException()
    End If
    Return parrObjectData(index)
  End Get
End Property

The Default keyword is the magic that creates the indexer. Unfortunately C# does not support named indexers. You are going to have to create a custom collection wrapper and return that instead.

Public ReadOnly Object As ICollection(Of ObjectData)
  Get
    Return New CollectionWrapper(parrObjectData)
  End Get
End Property

Where the CollectionWrapper might would look like this:

Private Class CollectionWrapper
  Implements ICollection(Of ObjectData)

  Private m_Collection As ICollection(Of ObjectData)

  Public Sub New(ByVal collection As ICollection(Of ObjectData))
    m_Collection = collection
  End Sub

  Default Public ReadOnly Item(ByVal index as Integer) As ObjectData
    Get
      If (index = 0) Then
        Throw New ArgumentOutOfRangeException()
      End If
      Return m_Collection(index)
    End Get
  End Property

End Class
share|improve this answer
    
And if I want the property to have a name other then Item? –  codymanix May 13 '11 at 13:05

C# doesn't support the declaration of named indexed properties (although you can create indexers), but you can access indexed properties declared in other languages (like VB) by calling the setter or getter explicitly (get_MyProperty/set_MyProperty)

share|improve this answer

Why not make use of the 0 based indexing but give the illusion to the coder that it is 1 based?

ie

Return parrObjectData(index-1)
share|improve this answer
    
How should the method signature look like? –  codymanix May 13 '11 at 12:50
    
The same as it is, this should be the only line that should change. Apart from removing the (index = 0) if statement block –  w69rdy May 13 '11 at 12:51
    
But my problem is that with the current method signature, VB.NET doesn't allow me to call the method like myObject.Objects[index] –  codymanix May 13 '11 at 12:53

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