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The issue at hand looks easy, but I could not find an easy solution so far.

I've got a histogram describing the value distributing of an array of floats, roughly looking like this:

enter image description here

As you can see, there is a local maximum near 0, which keeps falling down to a local minimum, then rising quickly to a plateau, and in the end falling to 0. I would like to detect the local minimum.

In practice, the histogram is not as smooth:

enter image description here

There are lots of spikes, and the local minimum may be stretched and uneven. I'm not sure how to tackle this problem.

There is little domain knowledge. The first max may even be higher than the second max. There may be spikes in any direction, values may be as low as 0.

This is a real life sample taken from 8 distinct runs. It's scaled to 0 - 10 to make it easier to understand.

0: 22%  12% 19% 17% 6%  5%  6%  5%    
1: 3%   2%  1%  1%  4%  1%  4%  1%    
2: 6%   2%  13% 5%  0%  2%  0%  2%   
3: 62%  62% 52% 42% 2%  5%  2%  5%  
4: 4%   19% 12% 28% 10% 13% 10% 13%  
5: 0%   0%      3%  29% 30% 29% 30%
6:                  37% 31% 37% 30%
7:                  1%  7%  1%  7%
8:                  6%  1%  6%  1%
9:
10:

Values rounded down. Missing values denote no occurrence of any value.

Explanation of the first line:

0: 22%   the initial max
1: 3%    local min
2: 6%    still min
3: 62%   plateau max
4: 4%    second min
5: 0%    0
6:   no more values 
7:      
8:      
9:
10:

For reference, a list of the same data, this time scaled to 0 - 100 (there were no values in the 90-100 range at all). I messed up on the formatting, but it should give a rough idea.

0:  0%   0%   0%   1%   0%   0%   0%   0%
1:  0%   1%   1%   3%   0%   0%   0%   0%
2:  1%   2%   1%   3%   0%   0%   0%   0%
3:  4%   2%   3%   3%   0%   1%   0%   1%
4:  6%   1%   3%   2%   0%   0%   0%   0%
5:  2%   0%   3%   1%   0%   0%   0%   0%
6:  1%   0%   2%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
7:  1%   0%   1%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
8:  1%   0%   1%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
9:  1%   0%   1%   0%   1%   0%   1%   0%
10: 1%   0%   0%   0%   1%   0%   1%   0%
11: 0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
12: 0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
13: 0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
14: 0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
15: 0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
16: 0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
17: 0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
18: 0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
19: 0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
20: 0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
21: 0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
22: 0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
23: 0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
24: 0%   0%   1%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
25: 0%   0%   1%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
26: 0%   0%   1%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
27: 0%   0%   1%   0%   0%   0%   0%   0%
28: 1%   0%   2%   1%   0%   0%   0%   0%
29: 3%   0%   2%   2%   0%   0%   0%   0%
30: 7%   1%   3%   2%   0%   0%   0%   0%
31: 10%  2%   4%   3%   0%   0%   0%   0%
32: 10%  3%   4%   4%   0%   0%   0%   0%
33: 6%   6%   5%   5%   0%   0%   0%   0%
34: 5%   5%   4%   4%   0%   0%   0%   0%
35: 5%   8%   6%   3%   0%   0%   0%   0%
36: 5%   10%  6%   4%   0%   0%   0%   0%
37: 5%   9%   5%   3%   0%   0%   0%   0%
38: 3%   8%   5%   5%   0%   0%   0%   0%
39: 2%   5%   5%   5%   0%   0%   0%   0%
40: 1%   4%   4%   5%   0%   1%   0%   1%
41: 1%   3%   2%   5%   0%   1%   0%   1%
42: 0%   1%   1%   4%   0%   0%   0%   0%
43: 0%   2%   0%   4%   1%   1%   1%   1%
44: 0%   1%   0%   3%   1%   1%   1%   1%
45: 0%   1%   0%   1%   0%   1%   0%   1%
46: 0%   1%   0%   1%   1%   1%   1%   1%
47: 0%   1%   0%   0%   1%   1%   1%   1%
48: 0%   1%   0%   0%   1%   1%   1%   1%
50: 0%   0%   0%   1%   1%   1%   1%   1%
50:      0%        1%   1%   1%   1%   1%
51:      0%        0%   2%   1%   2%   1%
52:      0%        1%   2%   1%   2%   1%
53:      0%        0%   4%   2%   4%   2%
54:                0%   2%   2%   2%   2%
55:                0%   2%   2%   2%   2%
56:                0%   2%   3%   2%   3%
57:                0%   2%   4%   2%   4%
58:                     4%   6%   4%   6%
59:                     3%   3%   3%   3%
60:                     5%   5%   5%   5%
61:                     5%   7%   5%   7%
62:                     3%   5%   3%   5%
63:                     4%   3%   4%   3%
64:                     5%   2%   5%   2%
65:                     3%   2%   2%   2%
66:                     5%   1%   5%   1%
67:                     1%   0%   1%   0%
68:                     1%   0%   1%   0%
69:                     0%   1%   0%   1%
70:                     0%   0%   0%   0%
71:                     0%   0%   0%   0%
72:                     0%   0%   0%   0%
73:                     0%   1%   0%   1%
74:                     0%   0%   0%   0%
75:                     0%   0%   0%   0%
76:                     0%   1%   0%   1%
77:                     0%   0%   0%   0%
78:                     0%   0%   0%   0%
79:                     0%   0%   0%   0%
80:                     0%   0%   0%   1%
81:                     0%   0%   0%   0%
82:                     0%   0%   0%   0%
83:                     0%   0%   0%   0%
84:                     0%   0%   0%   0%
85:                     1%        1%
86:                     0%        0%
87:                     1%        1%
88:                     1%        1%
89:                     0%        0%
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5  
The trouble is, you're not trying to find the local minimum, you're trying to find a specific local minimum...the second lowest one. Your second example has many local minimums. A local minimum is just a pit in the graph where all surrounding values are higher. So you need to better define what you're actually trying to accomplish here...what makes this specific pit a local minimum and not any of the others? What is your acceptance criteria for a local min? –  Mark Peters May 13 '11 at 13:09
    
@mafutrct: How many points are in the histogram, and how is it stored? –  NPE May 13 '11 at 13:10
    
Good question, I'm not sure exactly myself. I'd like to estimate the marked green area so I could, for instance, select its x-average. But I'm also not sure how to define that area - are there any commonly used ways for similar problems? –  mafu May 13 '11 at 13:14
    
you might want to use spline approximation to smooth the graph (see link at the end) and then look for a local minimum. note that this might fail at times, but will be (I think) a good heuristic. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spline_%28mathematics%29 –  amit May 13 '11 at 13:15
    
@aix: Thousands of floating point values in an int-to-float map. The int equals the x-axis and contains 0, 1, 2, ..., n. –  mafu May 13 '11 at 13:16

4 Answers 4

Here's an algoithm:

  1. Smooth your data set by calculating a moving average for a small window.
  2. Test your smoothed data for local minima (i.e. any single datum that it is smaller than its neighbours.
  3. If there are more than two local minima, increase the window size, and goto step 1.

Update:

Having looked at the sample data you posted, I've realised that you need to detect minimal plateaus rather than just individual points, so step two in the algorithm should be tweaked to identify a point as part of a minimum if there are no neighbours with smaller values between the nearest higher value neighbours on either side. Then when counting minima in step 3, a minimal plateau should count as a single minimum.

I've tested this algorithm on your example datasets and it performs well, picking minima at: 18, 12, 15, 13, 23, 20, 23and20 for your datasets respectively.

share|improve this answer
    
A moving average can actually eliminate the lower local minimum sooner than a higher (and thus less interesting) one. Think of a deep local minimum surrounded sharply by high peaks, and a very subtle minimum surrounded by very gradual, gentle upward slopes. The subtle one will "win". –  Mark Peters May 13 '11 at 14:04
    
@Mark: Isn't that rather the point? This alleged interested lower minimum surrounded by high peaks isn't a lower minimum at all, it's noise. If it was a real low minimum, it wouldn't have those peaks. It's a bit like trying to find the bottom of a valley: if you stop at a deep well halfway up the slope, you're doing it wrong. –  Tom Anderson May 13 '11 at 15:27
    
@Tom: It could be, it might not be. It might be extremely significant but by this algorithm would be trumped by a very shallow but wide "other" local minimum. –  Mark Peters May 13 '11 at 16:12
    
Moving averages are a low-pass filter, they're just not a very good low-pass filter. –  Jim Clay May 14 '11 at 15:26
    
@Mark Peters: I was suggesting the algorithm with the expected signal in mind, where the minima of interest would be the only 'broad valley' in the data set. –  Ergwun May 17 '11 at 1:50

This actually sounds rather like histogram-based image segmentation to me (although this is not an image, so it's really just histogram segmentation). Sounds weird, but bear with me.

Is what's important about the minimum the fact that it's a minimum, or that it divides the small maximum from the large maximum? If it's the fact that it divides the maxima, then segmentation is definitely what you want.

Have a look at K-means clustering. You'd have two clusters. It's not a terribly complicated procedure, but Wikipedia (and other sources) do a much better job of explaining it than i could, so i'll leave it to them.

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The data actually come from an image (even though there is a lot of stuff inbetween). Thinking about it, the main goal is probably to split the 2 maxima. I'm going to have a look at WP. –  mafu May 13 '11 at 13:58
    
There are other, perhaps better, segmentation algorithms, but i can't remember of the names of anything except k-means (and fuzzy c-means, which is not what you want). There's a very nice one invented by a Japanese guy whose name completely escapes me. Sorry for being so unhelpful. –  Tom Anderson May 13 '11 at 15:29

Your "true" histogram is low frequency. Your noise is high frequency. Low-pass filtering the data with an appropriate bandwidth filter will get rid of most of the noise.

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a possible heuristic: using spline approximation to smooth the histogram, and make it polynomical-like and then look for a local minimum.
note that this is only a heuristic solution and might fail... but I think will provide a good solution for most cases.

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