Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on an ExtJS webapp and was looking for a way to list all of an object's own property names. Googling around, I quickly found some reference code on this blog. Now, when using this keys() method, I find some strange behavior when enumerating the property names of an object of objects. Example code:

keys = function(obj) {
    if (typeof obj != "object" && typeof obj != "function" || obj == null) {
        throw TypeError("Object.keys called on non-object");
    }
    var keys = [];
    for (var p in obj) 
        obj.hasOwnProperty(p) && keys.push(p);
    return keys;
};

var test = {}
test["nr1"] = {testid: 1, teststr: "one"};
test["nr2"] = {testid: 2, teststr: "two"};
test["nr3"] = {testid: 3, teststr: "three"};
for (var i in keys(test)) {
    console.log(i);
}

When running this code, the console outputs:

0
1
2
remove()

So, on top of the expected 3 property names, it also lists a "remove()" function. This is clearly related to ExtJS, because the enumeration works as expected on a blank, non-ExtJS loading page.

Can anyone explain me what exactly ExtJS is doing here? Is there a better way to enumerate object-own property names?

Thanks a bunch, wwwald

share|improve this question
7  
ExtJS seems to have added a function to the Array prototype –  Liviu T. May 13 '11 at 13:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, as @Thai said, not use for..in, as any array is a object and potentially could have different additions in different frameworks.

keys = function(obj) {
    if (typeof obj != "object" && typeof obj != "function" || obj == null) {
        throw TypeError("Object.keys called on non-object");
    }
    var keys = [];
    for (var p in obj) 
        obj.hasOwnProperty(p) && keys.push(p);
    return keys;
};

var test = {}
test["nr1"] = {testid: 1, teststr: "one"};
test["nr2"] = {testid: 2, teststr: "two"};
test["nr3"] = {testid: 3, teststr: "three"};
document.writeln('<pre>');
document.writeln('Current method');
for (var key in keys(test)) {
    document.writeln(key);
}


document.writeln('Better method1');
for (var arr=keys(test), i = 0, iMax = arr.length; i < iMax; i++) {
    document.writeln(arr[i]);
}

document.writeln('Better method2');
Ext.each(keys(test), function(key) {
   document.writeln(key); 
});
document.writeln('</pre>');
share|improve this answer
    
@see jsfiddle.net/xaFXR/5 –  gaRex May 14 '11 at 11:38
    
Ah, now I see. Thanks for pointing out the difference. The Ext.each() solution seems perfect! –  wwwald May 16 '11 at 8:09

Try to check hasOwnProperty to only list properties of the array itself, not its prototype.

for (var i in keys(test)) {
    if(keys(test).hasOwnProperty(i)){
      console.log(i);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

keys(test) returns an array, so you are expected to use the classic for-init-condition-next loopm and not the for-in loop.

(function(arr) {
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i ++) {
        console.log(i);
    }
})(keys(test));
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.