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After the user is done with form "f", the form will retain a value that I want to check before running doStuff(). Like, if f.value > 0 , then run doStuff(), else, don't run doStuff(). How can I most concisely modify my code to allow for this check? I don't quite understand when the delegate is assigned, if I pass f.value, will it take the value when I'm adding the delegate, or when it is running the delegate?

form f = new form();
f.Show();
f.FormClosing += delegate{doStuff();};

Thanks!

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1  
Don't use anonaymous delegate here, it provide memory leak. – Viacheslav Smityukh May 13 '11 at 14:06
    
How can you work around this memory leak? – sooprise May 13 '11 at 14:37
    
Or make the delegate un-anonymous. – sooprise May 13 '11 at 14:37
    
My answer was voted down before I changed it, but I changed it to what I would do. I agree with Viacheslav. I'd say code it into the form and let the form handle it. Should be no memory leaks there. See my response below. – Mike Webb May 13 '11 at 14:40
    
To prevent memory leak you should unsubscribe delegate from the event, but you can't do that because your delegate is anonaymous. You should use regular syntax of C# to implement it. Please investigate my answer. – Viacheslav Smityukh May 13 '11 at 15:03
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can capture the value of the reference when making the delegate:

f.FormClosing += delegate { if(f.value > 0) doStuff(); };

When the event occurs, it will check the current value of the captured reference f, and if the condition matches, continue executing.

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form f = new form();
f.Show();
f.FormClosing += delegate{if(f.Value>0){doStuff();}};

I believe that it uses the value at the time it runs, not at the time it is assigned. So it would use the value of f.Value when the FormClosing event fires

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Somthing like this?

        form f = new Form();
        f.Show();
        f.FormClosing += (s, a) =>
                             {
                                 if (f.Value > 0)
                                 {
                                     doStuff();
                                 }
                             };
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My understanding is that lambdas are run in the scope that they're defined, so...

form f = new form();
f.Show();
f.FormClosing += delegate
{
   if(f.Value > 0)
      doStuff();
};
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You can use regular syntax to implement it

form f = new form();
f.FormClosing += FormClosingHandler; // Add unanonaymous delegate to the event handler
f.Show();

private void FormClosingHandler(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
{
   var form = (form)sender;
   form.FormClosing -= FormClosingHandler; // Unsubscribe from the event to prevent memory leak

   if(form.value > 0)
   {
      doStuff();
   }
}
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I wouldn't do it this way. I'd let the form handle it all. Just run the form...

public void showMyForm()
{
    form f = new form();
    f.Show();
}

...then define the form closing event in the form .cs file and link the event in the form itself...

public partial class form : Form
{

    //Link the event in the IDE and let InitializeComponent() add it. Then perform the
    //the things you want in the form itself based on your condition
    private void doStuff(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e) //Think that's the right args
    {
        if (this.value > 0)
        {
            //code you want to execute.
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
this is anonymous delegate delegate{doStuff();}; – Viacheslav Smityukh May 13 '11 at 14:10
    
@Viacheslav Smityukh - I know. My original thoughts were wrong, so I have been editing my response. – Mike Webb May 13 '11 at 14:11
    
"else return" is unnecessary – Viacheslav Smityukh May 13 '11 at 15:06
    
True enough. Removed it. – Mike Webb May 13 '11 at 15:12

If f.Value is a member of the form it will be checked when the delegate is run and you will get the value that is assigned at that moment, not at the moment you assigned the delegate.

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