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It's actually two part question regarding my simple page (that will be replaced some day with real content), HTML+CSS boilerplate used there for vertical centering and IE7.

http://engitize.net/

  1. Can anyone provide detailed explanation why the page is displayed correctly in non-IE browsers (Chrome, Fx, Opera), almost all semi-recent to recent IEs (IE5.5, IE6, IE8, IE9), but not in IE7?

    I am especially interested in: it works in IE6, yet it doesn't work in IE7, because... kind of explanation.

  2. What should be changed to make div#c properly centered vertically in IE7?
    I am using specific height for div#c, but used boilerplate is height-agnostic and fix should preserve this feature.

    Spoiling other browsers is not an option, unless it's IE5.5 (ok, IE6 too, but only if it is really unavoidable).

    Changing <!DOCTYPE html> and turning IEs into quirks mode is also not accepted (and it's a pretty bad practice for newly developed pages).

If you don't have IE7 (just as I), you can visit http://ipinfo.info/netrenderer/ or http://browserling.com/, paste URL there and choose IE7 to see the problem yourself.


Because the page will change after accepting some answer, I'm providing snapshot of relevant HTML and CSS parts from it (with logo URL changed to be absolute).

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
<style type="text/css">
html, body { height: 100%; }
body { background-color: #fff; color: #000; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; }
div { margin: 0px; padding: 0px; }
#outer { position: relative; width: 100%; height: 100%; overflow: visible; }
#outer[id] { display: table; position: static; }
#middle { position: absolute; top: 50%; width: 100%; text-align: center; } /* for explorer only*/
#middle[id] { display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle; position: static; }
#c { position: relative; top: -50%; } /* for explorer only */
#c { width: 385px; height: 120px; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; }
#c { background-image: url(http://engitize.net/engitize.png); background-repeat: no-repeat; background-position: center top; }
#c div { position: relative; top: 100px; width: 100%; color: #666; font-weight: bold; font-family: serif; font-size: 12px; text-align: right; }
#footer { width: 100%; text-align: center; height: 15px; padding: 5px 0 0 0; margin: -20px auto 0 auto; border: 0; background-color: #def; } 
#footer div { padding: 0px 5px 0px 5px; text-align: right; font-size: 10px; font-family: sans-serif; }
a { text-decoration: none; color: #006; }
a:hover { color: #00c; }
p { margin: 0px; padding: 0px; }
</style> 
</head>
<body>
<div id="outer"><div id="middle"><div id="c"><div> 
because history is important!
</div></div></div></div> 
<div id="footer"><div> 
<p style="float:left;"><strong>Przemysław Pawełczyk</strong>'s imprint | Coming in 2012!</p> 
<p style="float:right;"><a href="http://przemoc.net/">Przemoc's network</a></p> 
</div></div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
I'll take a look at your updated/bountied question when I get a chance. It just seemed pointless to investigate before. Just one thing though - you should forget IE5(.5) ever existed. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… - nobody uses it. –  thirtydot May 16 '11 at 9:32
    
@thirtydot Sure, there is no need to support IE5.5 (I said from the beginning that spoiling page in it is acceptable, so I don't know why are you bringing it here), but it's nice when things works there "by the way". :) Unfortunately IE6 is still not dead. –  przemoc May 16 '11 at 10:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

your Q#1 has been answered by @thirtydot, IE7 and below does not support the CSS table properties so another way has to be found for them. and his absolute positioning technique is usually the preferred way to do this as most times in a scenario like this (splash page?) the width and height of the centred content would be known.

addendum to above per comments: In answer to why it was working in IE6 and not IE7 even though IE6 doesn't support the table properties either, IE7 was actually picking up the position: static rule from the #middle[id] {} rule - IE7 does understand this type of selector so this means the later absolute/relative positioning was not working the same as it was in IE6

Taking the above into account redoing the CSS to make sure IE7 and 6 got the same CSS and that it was placed later in cascade to override the "good" CSS it turns out the the positioning method is height agnostic too, in the comments there are various links to to test this, but here is the final working version:

Hybrid table cell/positioning method : here

That fiddle does include the image width and heights, but if you remove them and the positioning for the "sub text" it does (or should) show that whatever is in the middle does stay centered

HTML used is the same as the bottom of this answer.. minus the extra <i></i> element

CSS:

html, body { height: 100%; margin: 0; padding: 0;}
body { background-color: #fff; color: #000;  }

#outer {
    position: relative;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    display: table;
}

#middle { 
    display: table-cell; 
    vertical-align: middle;
    text-align: center;
}

#c {
    width: 385px;
    height: 120px;
    margin: 0 auto;
    background: url(http://engitize.net/engitize.png) no-repeat 50% 50%;
}

/**** for IE7 and below ****/
/* hacks but there is another method below */
#middle {
  *position: absolute;
  *top: 50%;
  *width: 100%;
  *text-align: center;
  }

#c {
  *position: relative;
  *top: -50%;
}

/**** end IE7 and below rules ****/


#c div {
    position: relative;
    top: 100px;
    width: 100%;
    color: #666;
    font-weight: bold;
    font-family: serif;
    font-size: 12px;
    text-align: right;
}

#footer {
    width: 100%;
    text-align: center;
    height: 15px;
    padding: 5px 0 0 0;
    margin: -20px auto 0 auto;
    border: 0;
    background-color: #def;
}
#footer div {
    padding: 0px 5px 0px 5px;
    text-align: right; font-size: 10px;
    font-family: sans-serif;
}
#footer p {margin: 0;}

As pointed out in comments using the technique that the HTML5 boilerplate uses to class the HTML element conditionally see:

Conditional stylesheets vs CSS hacks? Answer: Neither!

means you could replace the IE7 hacks with:

.ie6 #middle, .ie7 #middle {
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  width: 100%;
  text-align: center;
}

.ie6 #c, .ie7 #c {
  position: relative;
  top: -50%;
}

Original alternative - "Matchstick Technique"

You could likely mix the following technique with the "table-cell" technique via conditional comments or hacks, but this (hacky!) technique works across browser as far as my tests have seen

As you've asked for a height agnostic version.. you might or might not like the "matchstick" technique, this involves using inline blocks and lining them up.. the "matchstick" is a 100% high empty, off page, inline-block element with its vertical-alignment set to "middle" once it's in place the next inline-block (your actual content div) sits beside it and aligns to the middle or it, then using text-align: center; on it you have the horizontal centering too

here's a link to a working example fiddle

Note: I've left your widths intact, but you can test without widths/heights by removing the height & width off #c and also remove the CSS for the #c div text div - in a plain text scenario entering text into either of these divs should 'auto' centre.

and especially note the insertion of the extra <i></i> HTML just inside the outer div (that's likely why this is not a preferred method!), this is the "matchstick" that props the whole page open.

Code used in fiddle:

html, body { height: 100%; margin: 0; padding: 0; }
body { background-color: #fff; color: #000; }

#outer { position: relative; width: 100%; height: 100%;}

/* a matchstick spacer */
#outer i {
 display: inline-block; 
 height: 100%; 
 width: 1px; 
 margin-left: -1px; /* to hide off page */
 margin-right: -4px; /* to remove spacing between this and #middle block */
 vertical-align: middle; /* will make inline block next to it center vertically */
 background: #f00; /* red, not required just to see or not see it */
 }

#middle { 
  display: inline-block;
  width: 100%;
  text-align: center;
  vertical-align: middle;
} 

/* image 385 * 120 */
#c { 
  display: inline-block;
  /* presuming image heights, but it wouldn't matter if there was width/height here or not */
  width: 385px; 
  height: 120px; 
  background: url(http://engitize.net/engitize.png) no-repeat 50% 50%; 
}

#middle, #c { /* IE hack for inline block on block level elements */
 *display: inline; 
}


#c div { position: relative; top: 100px; width: 100%; color: #666; font-weight: bold; font-family: serif; font-size: 12px; text-align: right; }

#footer { width: 100%; text-align: center; height: 15px; padding: 5px 0 0 0; margin: -20px auto 0 auto; border: 0; background-color: #def; } 
#footer div { padding: 0px 5px 0px 5px; text-align: right; font-size: 10px; font-family: sans-serif; }

a { text-decoration: none; color: #006; }
a:hover { color: #00c; }
p { margin: 0px; padding: 0px; }

HTML:

<div id="outer">
  <i></i>
  <div id="middle">
      <div id="c"><div>
        because history is important!
      </div></div>
  </div>
</div>

<div id="footer">
  <div>
   <p style="float:left;"><strong>Przemys?aw Pawe?czyk</strong>'s imprint | Coming in 2012!</p>
   <p style="float:right;"><a href="http://przemoc.net/">Przemoc's network</a></p>
  </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
Even if it is a bit hacky, it works, and doesn't require knowing the height. +1 –  thirtydot May 17 '11 at 10:02
    
+1, Thanks @clairesuzy. Maybe hackish, but seems interesting. I'll look closer at it later. I am not fully accepting simple answer of @thirtydot to Q1, because it works in IE6, which also does not support the CSS table properties (as I already noted in comment there). Can you explain why it works in IE6, but not in IE7? –  przemoc May 17 '11 at 10:03
1  
@przemoc : yep.. IE7 can read your middle[id] (and outer[id] for that matter) rules and the static position which is only supposed to be for non-IE browsers is being picked up.. I think your version can be made to work properly if the two versions were properly separated out into a lte IE 7 conditional comment as IE8 + should use the table properties.. do you want conditionals or a fixed hack version.. what's your preference –  clairesuzy May 17 '11 at 10:23
    
@prezemoc heres a fiddle using your original method with CSS properly separated (view the source for conditional comment) - fiddle.jshell.net/clairesuzy/7S4Cb/1/show - it does seem to be height agnostic too :) which I admit I didn't think it would be.. however do test as I only checked in IE7 and Quirks mode (which "usually" is a good indicator for IE6 –  clairesuzy May 17 '11 at 10:48
    
Thanks again @clairesuzy. I usually prefer to not increase number of .css files (here style sheet is in .html file, because it's a simple page). In your new fiddle footer is spoiled. :( –  przemoc May 17 '11 at 10:48

IE7 does not support display: table-cell, which you're using as part of your vertical centering technique.

Your page was relatively simple, so I simplified the HTML/CSS a lot. The centering now works properly everywhere I've tested it.

Complete code: http://jsbin.com/azuhe4

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the note, but same goes for IE6, yet it works there. –  przemoc May 13 '11 at 15:05
    
@przemoc: See my updated answer. –  thirtydot May 13 '11 at 15:26
    
+1, your simplification is nice (spoiling IE5.5 is acceptable, as I said before), but I still don't know why original code isn't working in IE7 and how it can be fixed. I am interested in it, because boilerplate I've used is content-height-agnostic. Your solution requires a priori height knowledge, which in my particular page example is obviously known, but not in general. –  przemoc May 14 '11 at 18:16

The line that's causing this behavior is...

position: static

...on the "#middle" CSS spec.

If I disable that line IE7 seems to render (more or less) the logo in the middle of the page.

share|improve this answer
    
True, although removing that line seemed to screw up IE8. I'm looking now to find a fix that works everywhere. –  thirtydot May 13 '11 at 15:01
    
less. Removing it places logo no longer in the middle of the page in all browsers. engitize.net/index2.html –  przemoc May 13 '11 at 15:07

It's the <!DOCTYPE>.

IE6 & 7 were a little flaky with that (that's what I've read, anyway).

If you do the following, you'll see things come around - with your code (no edits, save for a couple borders to see what's happening).

Here's what I did:

  1. Deleted your <!DOCTYPE>
  2. Added to your DIV {} CSS line - border:1px dotted gray
  3. At your "outer", "middle", and "c" divs, a threw an inline border-color just to see which was which.
  4. Hit Refresh

Then pasted <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">, and hit Refresh again. Looked fine to me. Centered vertically, horizontally.

As of April 20, 2011 W3C states <!DOCTYPE HTML> as "Not a Standard". Certainly, IE6/7 have no idea what that tag means. http://www.w3.org/QA/2002/04/valid-dtd-list.html

share|improve this answer
3  
This isn't a good solution. By changing the doctype to that, you're putting IE (and other browsers) into Quirks Mode. While it may not matter for this page, purposely using Quirks Mode is (almost) always a bad idea. You can verify it's Quirks Mode by looking at any page with that doctype, and hitting (in IE) F12 to bring up the Developer Tools - it will say "Document Mode: Quirks Mode". Also CTRL+F for the doctype here: http://hsivonen.iki.fi/doctype/. Lastly, <!DOCTYPE HTML> works just fine with IE6 and IE7 - they'll be put into their "Standards Mode". –  thirtydot May 17 '11 at 9:15
    
Thanks @Dawson for your effort, but it is exactly like @thirtydot explained. I mean DOCTYPE is just a looks-like-problem here, but it should definitely remain how it is now. –  przemoc May 17 '11 at 9:49

I got new and easy solution for that:

<style>

    .vam{vertical-align:middle;}

</style>

<div style="line-height:200px; border:1px solid #000000; height:200px; 
text-align:center;color:#FFFFFF; font-size:1px;">

    .<img src="her-banner.jpg" alt="" class="vam" />

</div>
share|improve this answer

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