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Let's suppose I create a few objects and I add them to an array.

House *myCrib = [House house];
House *johnHome = [House house];
House *lisaHome = [House house];
House *whiteHouse = [House house];

NSArray *houses = [NSArray arrayWithObjects: myCrib, johnHome, lisaHome, whiteHouse, nil];

Normally, all House objects have a retain count of two, but they're being autoreleased once. After a while, I decide to release myCrib, even if I'm not the owner — I never retained or initialized.

[myCrib release];

The retain count should drop to zero and my object should be deallocated. My question now is: will this illegal action cause my app to work erroneously or even crash, or will NSArray simply delete my object from its list with bad consequences.

I'm looking for a way to maintain a list of objects, but I want the list to maintain itself. When some object disappears, I want the reference to it to disappear from my array gracefully and automatically. I'm thinking of subclassing or wrapping NSArray.

Thank you.

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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should not release myCrib if you are not the owner. To do so is a violation of the memory management guidelines and will make your code extremely difficult to maintain. I cannot stress enough that you absolutely should never do this under any sort of circumstance. You're asking for crashes; the array has declared ownership of the object, and you must not subvert that ownership in any way.

So the answer here is: your code is absolutely wrong and you should fix it. If you can't fix it, you should trash it and start over and keep rewriting it until you've come up with another way to achieve the same effect without subverting object ownership. I guarantee that it's possible.


If what you want is a weak-referencing array, then there are a couple ways you can do this (this was just asked a couple of days ago):

  1. NSPointerArray - weakly references its pointers. When you use garbage collection, they're autozeroing (ie, the pointers get removed when the object is deallocated). Unfortunately, this is not available on iOS.
  2. CFMutableArrayRef - you can specify a custom retain and release callback, or just not specify one at all. If you leave them out, the array will simply not retain the objects it contains. However, this does not automatically remove the pointer when the object is deallocated.
  3. DDAutozeroingArray - an NSMutableArray subclass I wrote the other day to provide a weakly-referencing and auto-zeroing array that works on both Mac OS and iOS. However, I strongly encourage you to use this only as a last resort; There are probably much better ways of doing what you're looking for. https://github.com/davedelong/Demos
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I know it is invalid code, that's why I said what would happen if I actually used this invalid code. I found a better way, anyway. :-) –  Randy Marsh May 14 '11 at 10:29
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My question now is: will this illegal action cause my app to work erroneously or even crash, or will NSArray simply delete my object from its list with bad consequences.

Your array now has an invalid object pointer. There's no way to tell that the pointer is invalid just by looking at it, and the array isn't notified that the object has been deallocated. The problem isn't with the array, after all, the problem is with the code that improperly releases the object. So yes, the application will likely crash or otherwise behave incorrectly due to that bad pointer, and no, NSArray won't detect and deal with the problem for you.

I'm looking for a way to maintain a list of objects, but I want the list to maintain itself. When some object disappears, I want the reference to it to disappear from my array gracefully and automatically.

If the objects in the list are all instances of a common class, you could define your own memory management methods that both retain/release the object and add/remove it from the list, or broadcast appropriate notifications in case there can be multiple lists. I suppose you could even override -retain and -release for this purpose, but I'd think long and hard about that before doing it, and document it well if you do; it's not the sort of thing that other developers would expect.

Another option might be Core Data. If you delete a managed object from the object graph, it'll disappear from any relationships. Strictly speaking, a to-many relationship is a set, not a list, but the difference may not be a concern for your purposes.

Update: I just noticed that you didn't tag your question ios. If you're working under MacOS X, you should definitely take a look at NSPointerArray. If you use garbage collection, NSPointerArray can be configured to use weak references and to replace references to collected objects with null references. This is exactly what you seem to be looking for.

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I'm looking for a way to maintain a list of objects, but I want the list to maintain itself. When some object disappears, I want the reference to it to disappear from my array gracefully and automatically. I'm thinking of subclassing or wrapping NSArray.

If I have understood right, what you want is an array of weak references. Then, you might be interested in reading this post.

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+1 for beating me to NSPointerArray. That's a very good thread. –  Caleb May 13 '11 at 17:08
    
+1 Never heard of NSPointerArray. Must do some Mac programming at some point... –  Stephen Darlington May 13 '11 at 18:44
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You're asking for a crash here. Your NSArray will still have a reference to the object that now no longer exists -- and who knows what it will be pointing to after a while?

Subclassing NSArray might not be the answer either. It's a class cluster which, in short, means that it's harder to subclass than you might hope.

Not entirely sure how you'd implement this. Something like the element sending a notification when they're about to be deallocated which the array would then pick up. You'd need to be careful that you didn't leak or over-release your objects.

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But an object won't be deallocated while the array has a reference to it. –  Caleb May 13 '11 at 16:40
    
@Caleb my understanding is that he's wanting to release the object for the array, thus forcing it to be deallocated. –  Dave DeLong May 13 '11 at 16:43
    
@Dave, I take it as: "I want the array to keep track of a group of objects, but only while they're valid." He wants to avoid having to maintain the array. You're right that as written, he's trying to release the object for the array, and that's obviously wrong. But the goal is valid, and as I wrote in my updated answer I think NSPointerArray does what he wants if its available in his environment. –  Caleb May 13 '11 at 17:05
    
@Caleb fair point; I updated my answer with a link to some code I wrote the other day that does this. –  Dave DeLong May 13 '11 at 17:23
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I created a wrapper class — in my code it's called a controller — which maintains the (mutable) array for me. I initialize the controller class in my view controllers — the place where I need them — instead of using an array directly.

No invalid code for me. :-p

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