Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using a deque so I can generate rolling averages and variances for my data. I store n and n^2 as a pair in the deque and then use accumulate with my own operator+().

#include <deque>
#include <numeric>
#include <utility>

template <typename T1, typename T2>
std::pair<T1,T2> operator+(const std::pair<T1,T2>& lhs, const std::pair<T1,T2>& rhs)
{
   return std::pair<T1,T2>(lhs.first + rhs.first, lhs.second + rhs.second);
}

namespace resource 
{
template <typename T>
class rollingStats
{
public:
   rollingStats(unsigned int n, const T& val):
      xs(n, std::pair<T,T>(val, val*val))
   {;}
   ~rollingStats()
   {;}

   T getMean(void) const
   {
      std::pair<T,T> sum = std::accumulate(xs.begin(), xs.end(), std::pair<T,T>((T)0,(T)0));
      return sum.first / xs.size();
   }

   T getVar(void) const
   {
      const unsigned int n = xs.size();

      std::pair<T,T> sum = std::accumulate(xs.begin(), xs.end(), std::pair<T, T > ((T)0,(T)0));

      return ((n * sum.second - sum.first*sum.first) / (n * n));
   }

   void addValue(const T& val)
   {
      xs.pop_front();
      xs.push_back(std::pair<T,T>(val,val*val) );
   }

   const std::deque<std::pair<T,T> >& getXs(void) const {return xs;}
private:
   std::deque<std::pair<T,T> > xs;
};
}

I get a compilation error using g++ 4.1.2 which I can't resolve.

  [ CC         ]  resource/UnitTest: rollingStats_Test.o 
/usr/lib/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_numeric.h: In function ‘_Tp std::accumulate(_InputIterator, _InputIterator, _Tp) [with _InputIterator = std::_Deque_iterator<std::pair<float, float>, const std::pair<float, float>&, const std::pair<float, float>*>, _Tp = std::pair<float, float>]’:
../rollingStats.hpp:45:   instantiated from ‘T resource::rollingStats<T>::getMean() const [with T = float]’
rollingStats_Test.cpp:98:   instantiated from here
/usr/lib/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_numeric.h:89: error: no match for ‘operator+’ in ‘__init + __first.std::_Deque_iterator<_Tp, _Ref, _Ptr>::operator* [with _Tp = std::pair<float, float>, _Ref = const std::pair<float, float>&, _Ptr = const std::pair<float, float>*]()’
/usr/lib/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_bvector.h:267: note: candidates are: std::_Bit_iterator std::operator+(ptrdiff_t, const std::_Bit_iterator&)
/usr/lib/gcc/i386-redhat-linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_bvector.h:353: note:                 std::_Bit_const_iterator std::operator+(ptrdiff_t, const std::_Bit_const_iterator&)
make: *** [rollingStats_Test.o] Error 1

What have I got wrong here? Do I need to add my own functor instead of relying on the STL alone?

thanks

share|improve this question
    
May I suggest using the boost::accumulators library ? –  Alexandre C. May 13 '11 at 16:33
1  
I think you should try putting the + operator for the pair into the std namespace; looks like you might be hitting the C++ namespace resolution rules. –  Oliver Seiler May 13 '11 at 16:35
2  
@Oliver: except that you are technically not allowed to do this. –  Alexandre C. May 13 '11 at 16:36
1  
@jkp: You never instantiated the functions that cause the issue. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 13 '11 at 16:37
2  
I can see three options: use the form of accumulate that takes a binary function, using an add_pair function you'd need to write (probably the simplest option); subclass std::pair and give it addition operators (feels dirty); add a new struct/class that either has a pair or just has the members you need, and use that instead of the pair (probably the most flexible option). –  Oliver Seiler May 13 '11 at 16:41
show 5 more comments

3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

std::pair doesn't have an operator+, and you haven't provided a way for std::accumulate to call your implementation of operator+.

I would wrap the functionality you provided in operator+ in a functor...

template <typename T1, typename T2> struct pair_sum : public std::binary_function< std::pair<T1,T2>, std::pair<T1,T2>, std::pair<T1,T2> >
{
    std::pair<T1,T2> operator()(const std::pair<T1,T2>& lhs, const std::pair<T1,T2>& rhs)
    {
       return std::pair<T1,T2>(lhs.first + rhs.first, lhs.second + rhs.second);
    }
};

...and use that by calling the version of std::accumulate that takes 4 arguments:

std::pair<T,T> sum = std::accumulate(xs.begin(), xs.end(), std::make_pair((T)0,(T)0), pair_sum<T,T>());
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Just what I needed. I had thought that I could just provide my own operator+ for pairs and that it would be picked up. –  DanS May 16 '11 at 9:24
    
This answer is just what i needed thank you. –  petric Jun 14 '13 at 11:52
add comment

Quoting Oliver Seiler's comment:

I can see three options: use the form of accumulate that takes a binary function, using an add_pair function you'd need to write (probably the simplest option); subclass std::pair and give it addition operators (feels dirty); add a new struct/class that either has a pair or just has the members you need, and use that instead of the pair (probably the most flexible option).

[This is a community wiki answer. Feel free to edit to add corrections, samples, etc.]

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can get sum of pairs with help of boost::lambda:

#include <boost/lambda/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/lambda/construct.hpp>

template<typename T>
void summarize()
{
  typedef std::pair<T, T> pt_t;
  std::deque<pt_t> xs;
  using namespace boost::lambda;

  // fill xs with useful stuff

  pt_t res = std::accumulate(
    xs.begin(), xs.end(), std::make_pair(T(),T()),
    bind( constructor<pt_t>(),
      bind( std::plus<T>(), bind(&pt_t::first,_1), bind(&pt_t::first,_2) ),
      bind( std::plus<T>(), bind(&pt_t::second,_1), bind(&pt_t::second,_2) )
    ) );
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.