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I'm new to databases and I've never worked with any RDBMS. However I get the basic idea of relational databases. At least I think I do ;-)

Let's say I have a user database with the following properties for each user:

  • user
    • id
    • name
    • zip
    • city

In a relational database I would for example model it in a table called user

  • user
    • id
    • name
    • location_id

and have a second table called location

  • location
    • id
    • zip
    • city

And location_id is a foreign key (reference) to an entry in the location table. If I understand it right the advantage is here, if the zip code for a certain city changes I only have to change exactly one entry.

So, let's go to the non-relational database, where I started to play around with Google App Engine. Here I would really model it like it was written down first in the specifications. I have a kind user:

class User(db.Model):
    name = db.StringProperty()
    zip = db.StringProperty()
    city = db.StringProperty()

The advantage is that I don't need to join two "tables", but the disadvantage is, that if the zip code changes I have to run a script that goes through all user entries and updates the zip code, correct?

So, now there is another option in Google App Engine, which is to use ReferenceProperties. I could have two kinds: user and location

class Location(db.Model):
    zip = db.StringProperty()
    city = db.StringProperty()

class User(db.Model):
    name = db.StringProperty()
    location = db.ReferenceProperty(Location)

If I'm not wrong I now have exactly the same model as in the relational database described above. What I'm wondering now is, first of all, is that wrong what I just did and does that destroy all the advantages of a non-relational database. I understand, that in order to get the value of zip and city I have to run I second query. But in the other case, to make a change in the zip code I have to run through all existing users.

So what are the implications of these two modeling possibilities in a non-relational database like Google's datastore. And what are typical use cases for both of them, meaning when should I use one and when the other.

Also as an additional question, if in a non-relation database I can model exactly the same what I can model in a relational database, why should I use a relational database at all?

Sorry if some of these questions sound naive, but I'm sure they will help a couple people, who are new to database systems to get a better understanding.

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3 Answers 3

In my experience, the biggest difference is that non-relational datastores force you to model based on how you'll query, because of the lack of joins, and how you'll write, because of the transaction restrictions. This of course results in very denormalized models. After a while, I started to define all the queries first, to avoid having to rethink the models later.

Because of the flexibility of relational db's, you can think about each data family in separate, create relations between them and in the end query how you wish (abusing joins in so many cases).

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3  
+1 great answer. Now that I think about it, I'm doing the same without realising it. –  Peter Knego May 14 '11 at 15:25
3  
This is exactly what I was about to write. :) –  Nick Johnson May 15 '11 at 1:33

Imagine that GAE has two modes for the Datastore: RDMS-mode and non-RDMS-mode. If I take your ReferenceProperty example with the aim of "list all the users and all their zip codes" and write some code to print all of these.

For the [fictional] RDMS-mode Datastore it might look like:

for user in User.all().join("location"):
    print("name: %s zip: %s" % (user.name, user.location.zip))

Our RDMS system has handled the de-normalisation of the data behind the senes and done a nice job of returning all the data we needed in one query. This query did have a little bit of overhead as it had to stitch together our two tables.

For the non-RDMS Datastore our code might look like:

for user in User.all():
    location = Location.get( user.location )†
    print("name: %s zip: %s" % (user.name, location.zip))

Here the Datastore cannot help us join our data, and we must make an extra query for each and every user entity to fetch the location before we can print it.

This is in essence why you want to avoid overly normalised data on non-RDMS systems.

Now, everybody logically normalizes their data to some extent wether they are using RDMS or not, the trick is to find the trade off between convenience and performance for your use case.

† this is not valid appengine code, I'm just illustrating that user.location would trigger a db query. Also no-one should write code like my extreme example above, you can work around the continued fetching of related entities by say fetching locations in batches upfront.

if in a non-relation database I can model exactly the same what I can model in a relational database, why should I use a relational database at all?

relational-DB's excel at storing thousands-and-millions of rows of complex inter-related models of data, and allowing you to perform incredibly intricate queries to reform and access that data.

non-RDB's excel at storing billions+ rows of simple data and allowing you to fetch that data with simpler queries.

The choice should lie with your use-case really. The simpler structure of the non-relational model and design restraints that come with it is one of the main ways that AppEngine is able to promise to scale your app with demand.

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Your understanding of the concept of the relational database is flawed. Relational databases organize their data in relations which contain a set of tuples of the same type. To rephrase, data is stored in tables with each row containing the same number of fields with the same types in the same order.

The example you provided which utilizes a foreign key demonstrates database normalization. This is a concept that can apply to relational as well as other types of databases.

Sorry, I can't answer your questions about Google's storage system, but hopefully this will clarify your understanding enough to find out.

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