Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The goal:
I'm trying to use the new Entity Framework 4.1 DbContext API (using Database First with the new ADO.NET DbContext Generator for the POCO classes) and provide a layer of abstraction using basic, generic repositories.

The problem:
If I try to use a subquery with my repositories, EF cannot complete the translation and throws an error:
System.NotSupportedException: LINQ to Entities does not recognize the method 'System.Linq.IQueryable`1[EntityFramework41Test.Data.Entity.Table2] Query()' method, and this method cannot be translated into a store expression.

I've successfully used this design with the old 4.0 ObjectContext in the past, but I'd like to use the new API. The same approach also fails with the 4.0 ObjectContext API (tested using generated POCO entities).

Note: I don't think it's realistic to post hundreds of lines of code but I have a sample solution with an ASP.NET MVC 3 project using SQL Server CE 4.0 and a basic unit test project demonstrating the outcome of various approaches that can be uploaded or emailed if that helps.


The repository interface I am using is dead simple:

public interface IRepository<TEntity> : IDisposable where TEntity : class, ITestEntity
{
    TEntity GetById(int id);
    IQueryable<TEntity> Query();
    void Add(TEntity entity);
    void Remove(TEntity entity);
    void Attach(TEntity entity);
}

The context interface is even more simple:

public interface ITestDbContext : IDisposable
{
    IDbSet<TEntity> Set<TEntity>() where T: class, ITestEntity;
    void Commit();
}

Here is the sample usage that does not work, using interfaces for the repository and context instances:

using (ITestDbContext context = new TestDbContext())
using (IRepository<Table1> table1Repository = new Repository<Table1>(context))
using (IRepository<Table2> table2Repository = new Repository<Table2>(context))
{
    // throws a NotSupportedException
    var results = table1Repository.Query()
        .Select(t1 => new
        {
            T1 = t1,
            HasMatches = table2Repository.Query()
                .Any(t2 => t2.Table1Id == t1.Id)
        })
        .ToList();
}

The code above is the approach I'd like to use. The concrete classes will end up being injected.

Please disregard the fact that there are better ways to write this particular query than using a subquery. I've purposely simplified the code to focus on the actual issue: EF won't translate the query.

Storing the "inner" repository Query() method result in a local variable actually does work, but is not ideal as you'd have to remember to do it all the time.

using (ITestDbContext context = new TestDbContext())
using (IRepository<Table1> table1Repository = new Repository<Table1>(context))
using (IRepository<Table2> table2Repository = new Repository<Table2>(context))
{
    var table2RepositoryQuery = table2Repository.Query();

    // this time, it works!
    var results = table1Repository.Query()
        .Select(t1 => new
        {
            T1 = t1,
            HasMatches = table2RepositoryQuery
                .Any(t2 => t2.Table1Id == t1.Id)
        })
        .ToList();
}

I've also noticed some other approaches break or succeed, e.g. disregarding the repositories and calling TestDbContext.Set<TEntity>() works but ITestDbContext.Set<TEntity>() won't translate. Changing the definition of ITestDbContext.Set<TEntity>() to return DbSet<TEntity> instead of IDbSet<TEntity> still fails.

Edit:
I don't think this is possible without some query interception and translation. If I do find a solution in the future, I'll be sure to share it.

share|improve this question
4  
Somehow I am not surprised that your first approach doesn't work. It is similar as if you would write: HasMatches = SomeFunction() in contrast to bool value = SomeFunction(); ... HasMatches = value The first wouldn't work in LINQ to Entities, but the second does. LTE can work with an IQueryable in your subquery but not with a function which returns an IQueryable. But I am also surprised that this worked in EF 4.0 with the ObjectContext API. Ask your question also here (social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/adodotnetentityframework/…) to get hopefully developer attention. –  Slauma May 16 '11 at 17:27
1  
@Slauma: Your local variable/method call comparison makes perfect sense. Note: I overlooked that my old ObjectContext API project uses query interceptor logic in my Repository classes to do some automatic Enum conversions (to work around the lack of Enum support in EF). I wasn't doing anything specific to convert any IQueryable method calls, but I wonder if the query wrapping had side-effects that caused the above scenario to work. I'll see if I can get the above working with a vanilla EF 4.0 ObjectContext first (which should have been my first approach). Thanks for the MSDN forum link. –  GWB May 16 '11 at 18:00
1  
Let us know when you have a result. If your query really works with ObjectContext it would mean that we have less query capabilities with DbContext than with ObjectContext which would be very surprising for me as I have the same understanding like you wrote - that all the hard work is finally delegated from DbContext to ObjectContext. –  Slauma May 16 '11 at 19:37
1  
@Slauma: I've created a better test solution that uses both the old ObjectContext API and new DbContext API. Both cases fail the first example and pass the second example. However, they both fail/pass different test cases depending on how the context and query sets are cast. I don't think any capabilities are sacrificed with DbContext and I much prefer the new API. I'll live with the second example above for now and explore query intercepting/translation later. I'll update my question to reflect my new findings. –  GWB May 17 '11 at 17:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't have experience with EF, but based on working with NHibernate and its evolving LINQ support, I suspect that the answer to your question is the one you won't like -- it sounds like this particular construct is not (yet?) supported by the EF LINQ provider and you need to alter your query.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hm, as someone who has "no experience with EF" you "suspect" that the query is "not supported" after the questioner has received a "NotSupportedException"? Do you really consider this as an answer? –  Slauma Jun 7 '11 at 18:04
1  
@Slauma, fair criticism. I do, because my answer is informed by my experience with the (very substantial) complexity of developing a comprehensive LINQ provider and my experience with another ORM implementation. I don't think there is anything fundamentally wrong with the OP query, other than that he ran into an unsupported edge case. Certainly, I agree that there is a good chance that an EF expert may come up with a different (and better) answer. –  Michael Teper Jun 7 '11 at 23:34
    
This answer is technically correct. It's simply not (yet?) supported. –  GWB Dec 13 '11 at 21:45

You need to Include all properties to related objects on your DbSet<SomeEntity> before you create an IQuerable out of it.

public class SomeEntity
{
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public virtual SomeOtherEntity Other { get; set; }
}

public class Repository
{
    public IQueryable<SomeEntity> Query()
    {
        _context.Set<SomeEntity>().Include("Other").AsQueryable();
    }
}

You can provide this to your Query method by using a func or something. Use your creativity ;)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.