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I have problem with following code:

  template <typename T>
  void foo(struct bar & b);
  struct bar {};
  int main(){}

It compiles successfuly on GCC, but fails on MSVC (2008) with following error:

C2990: 'bar' : non-class type as already been declared as a class type

Is the code wrong or it's a bug in MSVC?

It works if I add struct bar; before template definition.

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Also fails with VC++ 2010. And God, what a horrible IDE for C++ development VS has become! –  nbt May 13 '11 at 20:04
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

And we have our winner:

https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/668430/forward-declared-type-and-non-class-type-as-already-been-declared-as-a-class-type

Thank you for reporting this issue. This is indeed a case of non-conformant behaviour in VC++. However, a simple workaround is to reorder the declarations so that the declaration "struct bar" is known when the template declaration is encountered. Due to the low severity of this bug and our priorities, we regret that we cannot fix the bug in the next release of the compiler but we will consider it for a future release.

Regards,

Tanveer Gani Visual C++ Team

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In most situations, a C (or C++ compiler) works strictly top-to-bottom on your source code. So you need a forward declaration before you ever attempt to reference struct bar, otherwise the compiler will not know that it exists.

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You can make inline forward declaration. Like void foo(struct bar & b);. The struct keyword here is forward declaration. –  Hello C Plus Plus May 13 '11 at 17:55
    
@Hello: Really? I'm not saying you're wrong, merely that I've never seen this before. Could you provide a reference? –  Oli Charlesworth May 13 '11 at 18:08
    
@Oli: Try it without the template, it will compile. :) –  Xeo May 13 '11 at 18:13
    
@Oli No reference to the standard but for instance Boost.Exception use it to create (tag) types on the fly for boost::error_info<struct this_is_a_tag, T> boost.org/doc/libs/1_46_1/libs/exception/doc/error_info.html –  Luc Danton May 13 '11 at 18:13
    
@Oli: Check this code: ideone.com/hlPN0. With no "struct" before bar in function declaration, we get ‘bar’ was not declared in this scope error. –  Hello C Plus Plus May 13 '11 at 18:13
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You most likely have struct bar {}; somewhere above this block of code (possibly in a header file). See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zfcw8kk9.aspx

Edit: Also from the link above:

C2990 can also occur due to a breaking change in the Visual C++ compiler for Visual C++ 2005; the compiler now requires that multiple declarations for the same type be identical with respect to template specification.

Since foo is templated and bar is being "forward-declared" in the foo argument list, what happens if you move struct bar {}; above foo?

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No, this is full, minimal code. –  Hello C Plus Plus May 13 '11 at 17:50
    
@Hello Edited base on your comment. –  Chris Morgan May 13 '11 at 17:56
    
Replying to your edit: yes, it would work then. Also, It works if I add struct bar; before template definition. like I've written in my question. –  Hello C Plus Plus May 13 '11 at 18:48
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That looks like valid code. Whatever MSVC is doing, it appears to be some weird non-conforming behavior, from what I can see.

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