Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
Lib1[dll]
{
class A
{
static int i=0;
}
}

Program1[exe] have reference to Lib1
{
 Class B
 {
    main()
    {
      A.i = 5;
    }
 }
}

Program2 [exe] have reference to Lib1
{
 Class C
 {
    main()
    {
      A.i = 5;
    }
 }
}

If Program1 and Program2 are executing simultaneously, is it possible that they reference to a single instance of Lib1 and change made to the static variable of A.i in Program1 are available to Program2 and viceversa,

share|improve this question
    
which operating system? – dthorpe May 13 '11 at 18:10

In general, no, what you are asking for is not possible or recommended. In most operating systems (Windows, Linux, etc), each program instance runs in a separate process address space which is isolated from all other processes. In some cases, the read-only executable code of shared DLLs may be shared between processes to reduce overall memory consumption, but the writable data is local to each process.

You can achieve what you're asking for by making use of OS services to explicitly set up a shared memory area that can be accessed by multiple processes. In Windows, this can be done by creating named shared memory objects, using a name that is known in advance by all participants. You can then typecast that memory block to a structure type and read and write fields in that memory area, and all processes that have a view onto that shared memory will see the same data.

Since multiple processes are running concurrently, you will also need to think about how the data in the shared memory area is updated. If multiple processes need to update a counter field or whatnot in the shared memory area then you need to implement thread safe practices around read and write of that data, such as interlocked increment or using a named mutex object as an exclusive access lock.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.