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Lets say that I have an array of 4 32-bit integers which I use to store the 128-bit number

How can I perform left and right shift on this 128-bit number?

Thanks!

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6  
what have you tried? –  C Johnson May 13 '11 at 18:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
void shiftl128 (
    unsigned int& a,
    unsigned int& b,
    unsigned int& c,
    unsigned int& d,
    size_t k)
{
    assert (k <= 128);
    if (k >= 32) // shifting a 32-bit integer by more than 31 bits is "undefined"
    {
        a=b;
        b=c;
        c=d;
        d=0;
        shiftl128(a,b,c,d,k-32);
    }
    else
    {
        a = (a << k) | (b >> (32-k));
        b = (b << k) | (c >> (32-k));
        c = (c << k) | (d >> (32-k));
        d = (d << k);
    }
}

void shiftr128 (
    unsigned int& a,
    unsigned int& b,
    unsigned int& c,
    unsigned int& d,
    size_t k)
{
    assert (k <= 128);
    if (k >= 32) // shifting a 32-bit integer by more than 31 bits is "undefined"
    {
        d=c;
        c=b;
        b=a;
        a=0;
        shiftr128(a,b,c,d,k-32);
    }
    else
    {
        d = (c << (32-k)) | (d >> k); \
        c = (b << (32-k)) | (c >> k); \
        b = (a << (32-k)) | (b >> k); \
        a = (a >> k);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Fails for k > 32. You don't think a function would be better than a macro? –  Loki Astari May 13 '11 at 19:34
    
@MArtin: you're right, haven't though at that aspect or shifting more than 32. –  Remus Rusanu May 13 '11 at 19:37
    
@Remus Rusanu: See below. –  Loki Astari May 13 '11 at 19:42
    
Assuming unsigned int is 32 bit... –  BЈовић May 13 '11 at 19:54
    
@Remus Rusanu and MArtin: Thanks a lot! –  artichoke101 May 13 '11 at 20:06

Working with uint128? If you can, use the x86 SSE instructions, which were designed for exactly that. (Then, when you've bitshifted your value, you're ready to do other 128-bit operations ...)

SSE2 bit shifts takes ~4 instructions on average, with one branch (a case statement). No issues with shifting more than 32 bits, either. The full code for doing this is, using gcc intrinsics rather than raw assembler, is in sseutil.c (github: "Unusual uses of SSE2") -- and it's a bit bigger than makes sense to paste here. The hurdle for many people in using SSE2 is that shift ops take immediate (constant) shift counts. You can solve that with a bit of C preprocessor twiddling (wordpress: C preprocessor tricks). After that, you have op sequences like:

LeftShift(uint128 x, int n) = _mm_slli_epi64(_mm_slli_si128(x, n/8), n%8) for n=65..71, 73..79, … 121..127 ... doing the whole shift in two instructions.

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Since you mentioned you're storing your 128-bit value in an array of 4 integers, you could do the following:

void left_shift(unsigned int* array)
{   
    for (int i=3; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        array[i] = array[i] << 1;

        if (i > 0)
        {
            unsigned int top_bit = (array[i-1] >> 31) & 0x1;
            array[i] = array[i] | top_bit;
        }
    }
}

void right_shift(unsigned int* array)
{   
    for (int i=0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        array[i] = array[i] >> 1;

        if (i < 3)
        {
            unsigned int bottom_bit = (array[i+1] & 0x1) << 31;
            array[i] = array[i] | bottom_bit;
        }
    }
}
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First, if you're shifting by n bits and n is greater than or equal to 32, divide by 32 and shift whole integers. This should be trivial. Now you're left with a remaining shift count from 0 to 31. If it's zero, return early, you're done.

For each integer you'll need to shift by the remaining n, then shift the adjacent integer by the same amount and combine the valid bits from each.

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Instead of using a 128 bit number why not use a bitset? Using a bitset, you can adjust how big you want it to be. Plus you can perform quite a few operations on it.

You can find more information on these here:

http://www.cppreference.com/wiki/utility/bitset/start?do=backlink

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@C Johnson I agree a bitset can be used, but I am looking at it from more of a logical standpoint and having those 4 32-bit ints as a constraint –  artichoke101 May 13 '11 at 19:10

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