Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a worker thread that creates a runnable object and calls runOnUiThread on it, because it deals with Views and controls. I'd like to use the result of the work of the runnable object right away. How do I wait for it to finish? It doesn't bother me if it's blocking.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Just scratching out the highlights

synchronized( myRunnable ) {
   activity.runOnUiThread(myRunnable) ;

   myRunnable.wait() ; // unlocks myRunable while waiting
}

Meanwhile... in myRunnable...

void run()
{
   // do stuff

   synchronized(this)
   {
      this.notify();
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
does the run() need to be synchronized as well? –  djcouchycouch May 13 '11 at 20:04
    
I managed to get it working using this method. –  djcouchycouch May 13 '11 at 21:46
    
tried implementing that but my App crashes when trying to notify()... Why ? No exception nothing just a plain crash –  Amit Aug 10 '12 at 10:23
11  
I think you need to wrap the notify() in a synchronized block, or there's a chance that the call to notify() could happen before the call to wait() –  Baqueta Jun 19 '13 at 9:04
1  
Baqueta's suggestion has made my code work. Otherwise, it crashed with a "synchronized object not locked by thread before notify" exception. –  BVB Jun 28 '13 at 17:50

Andrew answer is good, I create a class for easier use.

Interface implementation :

/**
 * Events for blocking runnable executing on UI thread
 * 
 * @author 
 *
 */
public interface BlockingOnUIRunnableListener
{

    /**
     * Code to execute on UI thread
     */
    public void onRunOnUIThread();
}

Class implementation :

/**
 * Blocking Runnable executing on UI thread
 * 
 * @author 
 *
 */
public class BlockingOnUIRunnable
{
    // Activity
    private Activity activity;

    // Event Listener
    private BlockingOnUIRunnableListener listener;

    // UI runnable
    private Runnable uiRunnable;


    /**
     * Class initialization
     * @param activity Activity
     * @param listener Event listener
     */
    public BlockingOnUIRunnable( Activity activity, BlockingOnUIRunnableListener listener )
    {
        this.activity = activity;
        this.listener = listener;

        uiRunnable = new Runnable()
        {
            public void run()
            {
                // Execute custom code
                if ( BlockingOnUIRunnable.this.listener != null ) BlockingOnUIRunnable.this.listener.onRunOnUIThread();

                synchronized ( this )
                {
                    this.notify();
                }
            }
        };
    }


    /**
     * Start runnable on UI thread and wait until finished
     */
    public void startOnUiAndWait()
    {
        synchronized ( uiRunnable )
        {
            // Execute code on UI thread
            activity.runOnUiThread( uiRunnable );

            // Wait until runnable finished
            try
            {
                uiRunnable.wait();
            }
            catch ( InterruptedException e )
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

}

Using it :

// Execute an action from non-gui thread
BlockingOnUIRunnable actionRunnable = new BlockingOnUIRunnable( yourActivity, new BlockingOnUIRunnableListener()
{
    public void onRunOnUIThread()
    {
        // Execute your activity code here
    }
} );

actionRunnable.startOnUiAndWait();
share|improve this answer
    
This is a great answer, but I think the one case it doesn't deal with is if it's invoked from the UI thread. Should be easy enough to detect that case and work around it though. –  Baqueta Jun 19 '13 at 9:07

Perhaps a little simplistic but a mutex will do the job:

final Semaphore mutex = new Semaphore(0);
activity.runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        // YOUR CODE HERE
        mutex.release();
    }
});

try {
    mutex.acquire();
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
share|improve this answer
    
In unit tests you should use Instrumentation.runOnMainSync - "Execute a call on the application's main thread, blocking until it is complete." Look at the code for the SyncRunnable class in Instrumentation if you're interested in copying that for yourself. –  Daniel Dec 27 '13 at 14:15

Use the AsyncTask class, its methods onPostExecure and onProgressUpdate are executed by the MAIN thread (the UI thread).

http://developer.android.com/reference/android/os/AsyncTask.html

Is the better way for your case!

Hope this can help you.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi pedr0. Thanks for your answer but I'm not sure if it'll work for me. From the documentation, it seems that AsyncTask is for creating a task from the ui thread to run in a worker thread. My situation is the reverse: I'm on a worker thread, creating a runnable for the ui thread and then waiting (still on the worker thread) for the runnable to finish. Is there something else that does something like AsyncTask but for my case? –  djcouchycouch May 13 '11 at 20:00
    
But when the onPostExecute methods is executed your working thread have finish! You can send a message to your activity app for do everything you want! Asynctask is the better way.. I think you should try some tutorial like this: xoriant.com/blog/mobile-application-development/… The pattern is Activity-Handler-AsyncTask and you will solve you problem (I hope!!) –  pedr0 May 13 '11 at 21:02
    
You've misunderstood the question. The code is called from within the working thread, sending a runnable to the activity, not the other way around. The working thread, which is a GLSurface.Renderer never ends. –  djcouchycouch May 13 '11 at 21:49
    
Ok, it is an important specification... In that case you have to synchronize threads manually with Andrew reply technique. –  pedr0 May 14 '11 at 10:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.