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I have a group of icons where when you hover over an icon, the other img's in the set fade out. I was able to do this using longer selectors, but I wanted to try using the siblings() selector, but I just can't get it to work. What am I missing here? Thanks

<div id="picks" class="section">
    <div class="pick left">
        <img src="images/p_mary.jpg" />
        <div class="icons">
            <a href="#" ><img src="images/i_imdb.png" /></a>
            <a href="#" ><img src="images/i_imdb.png" /></a>
            <a href="#" ><img src="images/i_imdb.png" /></a>
            <a href="#" ><img src="images/i_imdb.png" /></a>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

and then the javascript:

$("#picks").find("a > img").hover(function () {
    $(this).siblings().stop().fadeTo(0, .3);
    $(this).stop().fadeTo(0,1);
}, function () {
    $(this).siblings().stop().fadeTo(500, 1);
});
share|improve this question
    
Why are you wrapping the img elements in anchors, if they're not linking to anything? –  David Thomas May 13 '11 at 20:50
    
They do, I stripped them for clarity. –  Steve Kelly May 13 '11 at 21:04
    
Ah, thanks; I was just wondering about @moorman's solution. –  David Thomas May 13 '11 at 21:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Like this:

$('.icons > a').hover(function() {
    $(this).siblings().stop().fadeTo(300, 0.2);
}, function() {
    $(this).siblings().stop().fadeTo(300, 1);
});

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/5jvmK/3/


Performance increase

Using the above technique it will attach an hover event for all the matched elements. If you have a lot of icons on the page the performance could be low. Instead, you could use .delegate to help increase the performance:

$('.icons').delegate('a', 'hover', function(event) {
    if (event.type == 'mouseenter') {
       $(this).siblings().stop().fadeTo(300, 0.2);
    }
    else
    {
       $(this).siblings().stop().fadeTo(300, 1);
    }
});

This will attach an event onto JUST .icons and will fire on the event on the matched selector a.

Let's say you had 20 <div class="icons"> each with their own, let's say, 4 icons. With:

  • .hover: it'll attach 80 events to the DOM (20*4).
  • .delegate: it'll attach just 20. That's a 400% increase in performance.

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/5jvmK/5/

share|improve this answer
    
Your code worked, even without the not(this), since I assume siblings never references "this". I noticed you are using .icons, which I did at first, but there are so many of these on the page at once, that I attempted to speed up performance by using #picks. Is this still a performance savings after the sizzle selector engine was introduced? and why doesn't this same implementation work with my previous selector? Thank you for the help –  Steve Kelly May 13 '11 at 20:56
    
Ah yes good point about the not(this). Using #picks won't speed up anything and in fact if I'm understanding you correctly are you saying there are many divs with id #picks? This wouldn't even work. When attaching events it's not really the selector peformance you have to worry about normally; it's the number of events being attached to the DOM. See my updated answer which makes use of .delegate –  Gary Hole May 14 '11 at 9:55
    
Thanks for taking so much time. I really appreciate the insight. I'm only using one #picks, as the container. But I'll switch to using delegates now. –  Steve Kelly May 15 '11 at 2:54

Well the problem with the siblings() function is that it returns siblings on the same level.

if you would do the following for example:

$("#picks").find(".icons a").hover(function () {
    $(this).siblings().stop().fadeTo(0, .3);
    $(this).stop().fadeTo(0,1);
}, function () {
    $(this).siblings().stop().fadeTo(500, 1);
});

This should make the links fade because the "a" tags are on the same level and thus are siblings in the way "siblings()" is working. Using "a > img" selects all img tags ... but none of those have siblings...

Take a look at this code:

<a href="#">
  <img src="image.gif" />
  <img src="image.gif" />
  <img src="image.gif" />
</a>

Here the img tags have siblings ... I hope this is clear enough for you.

share|improve this answer
    
I definitely understand, and that makes sense, but the jquery docs are puzzling me. The first example seems to break that mold doesn't it?: api.jquery.com/siblings –  Steve Kelly May 13 '11 at 20:59
    
@steve, no, the first example illustrates exactly what rmo is saying. The example turns the text red for any items that are direct siblings of a .highlight element. –  James Montagne May 14 '11 at 4:00

I think that selector is actually targeting the img try:

$(this).parent().siblings().children().stop().fadeTo(0, .3);

For all possibly try:

var siblings = $(this).parent().siblings(); 
for(var s = 0; s < siblings.length; s++){ 
     $(siblings[s]).children().stop().fadeTo(0,.3);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I am trying to fade the img, not the anchor, so wouldn't parent().sibling() target all of the anchors? I tested with my code and it's behaving strangely with a flicker (probably due to trying to fade the img and anchor at the same time) –  Steve Kelly May 13 '11 at 20:49
    
I tried the new code you added, and now it is properly targeting the img, but this seems to make siblings useless in this case. Before I was using parent().parent().find("img"), which worked, but my understanding of siblings() made me think it would save a step through the DOM. –  Steve Kelly May 13 '11 at 20:52
3  
@Steve Kelly your img tags are inside the a tags. There is nothing else inside the a tags therefore each image has no siblings. Siblings are other elements that share a common immediate parent with the current element. –  Endophage May 13 '11 at 20:57
    
ok, so does this work? If I had used a general $("img") selector, would that make all the images siblings as opposed to the $("a > img") which requires the images to be parented under the same anchor in order to be siblings? –  Steve Kelly May 13 '11 at 21:06
1  
No siblings are only elements that are at the same level and branch of the dom. The idea you want are more like "cousins" which jQuery doesn't have a concept of. –  scrappedcola May 13 '11 at 21:10

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