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Hi I just have an array of names (strings) in flash, and I want to make sure that any duplicates from the array are removed, or at least that a function is performed only once per reocurring value in the array.

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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

More cat skinning:

var a:Array = ["Tom", "John", "Susan", "Marie", "Tom", "John", "Tom", "Eva"];
a.sort();
var i:int = 0;
while(i < a.length) {
    while(i < a.length+1 && a[i] == a[i+1]) {
        a.splice(i, 1);
    }
    i++;
}
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Many ways. You can sort the array and iterate over it ignoring entries that match the previous iteration. Or you can use indexOf() to search for duplicates. Or you can take one pass over the array, build a dictionary keyed on the strings (and just ignore keys that already have an entry).

Here is the Dictionary way, memory cost of 1 boolean per unique entry, easy on memory for when you expect a lot of dupes, and fast. If you have relatively few dupes, the sort + culling of consecutive dupes is probably more efficient

import flash.utils.Dictionary;

var array:Array = ["harry","potter","ron","harry","snape","ginny","ron"];
var dict:Dictionary = new Dictionary();

for (var i:int = array.length-1; i>=0; --i)
{
    var str:String = array[i] as String;
    trace(str);
    if (!dict[str])
    {
        dict[str] = true;
    }
    else
    {
        array.splice(i,1);
    }
}

dict = null;


trace(array);

Here's a sorting way, but note: THIS DOES NOT PRESERVE ORDER! You didn't say if that matters. But because it's using quicksort, it does tend to have O(N log N) performance plus the one extra pass, unless of course your data is a pathological case.

var array:Array = ["harry","potter","ron","harry","ron","snape","ginny","ron"];

array.sort();
trace(array);

for (var i:int = array.length-1; i>0; --i)
{
    if (array[i]===array[i-1])
    {
        array.splice(i,1);
    }
}


trace(array);

In addition to not specifying whether order matters, you did not say if it matters which of the dupes is left: the one at the lowest index, or the last one found. If that matters, you will need to re-order my dictionary example to run in the opposite direction. I started at the end because that makes it OK to do a splice without invalidating the loop count (i.e. by changing the array.length during the looping) If order matters, loop in the usual forward direction and copy out the first occurrence of each string to a new array, or modify the loop counter like this. This is probably the technique I'd use, because it preserves order and keeps the first-encountered instance of each string:

import flash.utils.Dictionary;

var array:Array = ["harry","potter","ron","harry","snape","ginny","ron"];
var dict:Dictionary = new Dictionary();

var len:int = array.length;
for (var i:int = 0; i<len; ++i)
{
    var str:String = array[i] as String;
    if (!dict[str])
    {
        dict[str] = true;
    }
    else
    {
        array.splice(i,1);
        i--; len--;
    }
}

dict = null;


trace(array);
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This is one way to do it, I'm sure there are others.

function removeDuplicate(sourceArray:Array) : void
{
    for (var i:int = 0; i < sourceArray.length - 1; i++)
    {
        for (var j:int = i + 1; j < sourceArray.length; j++)
        {
                if (sourceArray[i] === sourceArray[j])
                {   
                     // Remove duplicated element and decrease j index.
                     sourceArray.splice(j--, 1);
                }
        }
    }
}
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That would do it in place, but it's very wasteful in terms of time complexity, not the best solution. There are plenty of ways to do it that are not O(N^2). Exactly which solution is optimal for real data depends a little on what the expectation is for the frequency of the dupes. –  Adam Smith May 13 '11 at 23:47
    
yeah,agreed. Just giving him a concept to work with. Given any situation you might choose a different hammer. –  prototypical May 14 '11 at 1:25
    
But, I guess a tutorial on all the potential hammers and their pros and cons, might be worthwhile. I'm gonna pass on that for now though. –  prototypical May 14 '11 at 1:39
    
I threw in my ideas into my post. I hadn't bothered to actually write code earlier, because I was at work, but if the array has a lot of expected duplication, using a dictionary as a simple map is an O(N) solution time-wise, and will at most require 1 Boolean per unique entry worth of additional memory (much less than any solution that involves copying the strings to a new array). –  Adam Smith May 14 '11 at 2:51
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Good answers!

I've checked a few of them, and have worse results in contrast to my. It's quite simple:

var originalV : Vector.<String> = Vector.<String>(["a", "c", "d", "c", "b", "a", "e", "b", "a"]);
var resultV : Vector.<String> = new Vector.<String>();

var i : int, len : uint = linkedReferencesArr.length;
while(i < len) {
    var el : String = linkedReferencesArr[i];
    if(resultV.indexOf(el) == -1) resultV.push(el);
    i++;
}

trace(resultV); // here is vector with unique elements

Welcome guys!


Statistics with my data:

Dict approach: 8946ms, 8718ms, 8936ms

Obj approach: 8800ms, 8809ms, 8769ms

My old approach: 8723ms, 8599ms, 8700ms

This approach: 6771ms, 6867ms, 6706ms

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Here's another way to do it, possibly a little nicer to look at:

var removeList:Array = [];

// loop over every item in the original array
for each (var item:* in array) {
    // loop over every item again, checking for duplicates
    for each (var other:* in array) {
        // if two items that aren't the same item are equal and `other` doesn't
        // exist in the remove list, then cache it for later removal.
        if (item == other && item !== other && removeList.indexOf(other) == -1)
            removeList.push(other);
    }
}

// next, loop over the cached remove list and remove 'selected' items for removal
for each (var remove:* in removeList) 
    array.splice(array.indexOf(remove), 1);

This probably isn't the most performant way of doing it, @prototypical's method is probably much more efficient, but it's the theory that you asked for :)

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I voted for Adam's option, but then I found this, and it looks to me this could be better performance wise still?

  for (var i:uint = array.length; i > 0; i--){
     if (array.indexOf(array[i-1]) != i-1){
        array.splice(i-1,1);
     }
  }     

The idea here is that you loop backwards through the array, and since indexOf gives you the first occurring index, you can check the found index with the current index(i) and remove if not the same.

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would @prototypical s response not give issues if the sourceArray[i] matches sourceArray[j] more than once because the length of sourceArray would be shorter if an element has been .splice()d out of it?

I've rewritten this method to count from the end so that this doesn't happen

for (var i:int = sourceArray.length - 2; i >= 0; --i) 
{
    for (var j:int = sourceArray.length - 1; j > i; --j)
    {
        trace(i, j);
        if (sourceArray[j] === sourceArray[i]) sourceArray.splice(j, 1);
    }
}
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