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There's a file named startup.cmd that sets some environment variables, runs some preparation commands, then does:

start "startup" cmd /k

Which opens a command shell named startup. The manual process I'm trying to automate is to then enter the following command into this shell: get startup.xml. I thought the correct way to do this in Python would be something like this:

import subprocess

p = subprocess.Popen('startup.cmd', shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, stdin=subprocess.PIPE)

getcommand = 'get startup.xml'
servercommand = 'startserver'
p.stdin.write(getcommand)
p.stdin.write(startserver)
(stdoutdata, stderrdata) = p.communicate()
print stdoutdata
print stderrdata

But those commands don't seem to be executing in the shell. What am I missing? Also, the command shell appears regardless of whether shell is set to True or False.

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I'm running a cmd file that does a start command - isn't that technically a new process that I'm not controlling with the original Popen call? –  Nathan May 13 '11 at 22:02

2 Answers 2

I found this warning in subprocess's document,

Warning Use communicate() rather than .stdin.write, .stdout.read or .stderr.read to avoid deadlocks due to any of the other OS pipe buffers filling up and blocking the child process.

So my suggestion is to use communicate to send your command.

import subprocess

p = subprocess.Popen('startup.cmd', shell=True, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, stdin=subprocess.PIPE)

command = 'get startup.xml\n'
command += 'startserver\n'
(stdoutdata, stderrdata) = p.communicate(command)
print stdoutdata
print stderrdata
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't seem to work. I just realized I'm running a cmd file that does a start command - isn't that technically a new process that I'm not controlling with the original Popen call? –  Nathan May 13 '11 at 22:03
1  
Yeah, you're right. It's a new process so you can't communicate directly with Popen. If your cmd file is not very complicate, I suggest that you just completely replace it with python script. But do remember not to use communicate instead of stdin.write. –  ablmf May 13 '11 at 22:33
up vote -1 down vote accepted

This is a new process, so one cannot communicate directly with Popen.

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Sorry: just not true. As the OP and answer below correctly state, one can use either p.stdin.write() or p.communicate(). –  Dan H Oct 5 '12 at 10:19

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