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I saw this pattern:

Money = (function() {
    function Money(rawString) {
        this.cents = this.parseCents(rawString);
    }
});

in this CoffeeScript screencast preview. (The homepage for the screencast is here.)

Now, I don't understand this pattern. There is a Money function that contains a Money function. What's that about?

Could someone explain?

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7 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

As quoted, there's no point to that pattern other than that the outer Money symbol can be deleted from the window object (except on IE7 and below, but that's another story) because it's a normal (implicit) property of window (as opposed to a var or a symbol deriving from a function declaration). But even then, the outer Money symbol receives a function that does absolutely nothing. Could it be misquoted?

For instance, here's a fairly standard patttern:

Money = (function() {
    var someCompletelyPrivateVariable;

    function doSomethingCompletelyPrivate() {
    }

    function Money(rawString) {
        this.cents = this.parseCents(rawString);
    }

    return Money;
})();

That's the module pattern, and it lets you have completely private variables and functions (both illustrated) whilst only having one public symbol. But I've had to edit a fair bit to create that (the most significant edits being the return Money; at the end and the addition of () after the anonymous function so we're calling it rather than just defining it.

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@Crowder Could you elaborate? Why can it be deleted? –  Šime Vidas May 13 '11 at 22:08
    
@Šime Vidas: Done. –  T.J. Crowder May 13 '11 at 22:10
    
There's not much point to a constructor that returns something other than this. –  RobG May 13 '11 at 22:13
3  
@RobG: The thing I've added a return to isn't a constructor, it's a scoping function. Its purpose is purely to make private scope. It returns a function which might be a constructor function. Without more scope, we couldn't know. –  T.J. Crowder May 13 '11 at 22:15
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The outer Money function takes no arguments. The inner Money function captures rawString via closure. The advantage here is that you're not polluting the global namespace with the inner Money function definition.

EDIT: I would agree with TJ that the pattern as it stands is useless. It doesn't do anything and the outer function is used solely for scoping. Without seeing the screencast author's complete example, it's hard to tell where he is going with this.

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5  
Yes, but we're polluting the (outermost) namespace with the outer Money function definition. So how is not polluting the namespace with the inner one an advantage? –  Šime Vidas May 13 '11 at 22:02
    
You are encapsulating the function Money(rawString) thus preventing others from calling it. –  James Kovacs May 13 '11 at 22:04
1  
But you seemingly are polluting the global namespace with the outer parameter-less Money() definition. I still don't understand how you're gaining an advantage. Can you clarify? Also, where is the rawString variable stored? Does that have to be defined elsewhere in the global namespace? –  Charlie Kilian May 13 '11 at 22:04
3  
Also that doesn't explain what it's doing at all. It's a function that returns nothing, with no way to call the inner Money function. –  NickC May 13 '11 at 22:04
    
@Renesis I guess that renders it useless (= that pattern is not functional). –  Šime Vidas May 13 '11 at 22:15
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It doesn't look like a real example, the grouping operator of the "outer" function is pointless and as TJ says, it does absolutely nothing. Called as a constructor, it will return an empty object.

@TJ - the quote is correct, you need to watch about 40 seconds of the video.

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I think it must be misquoted in the video. –  T.J. Crowder May 13 '11 at 22:12
    
@Crowder I guess I'll better contact the producer of that screen-cast then :) –  Šime Vidas May 13 '11 at 22:16
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Using the CoffeeScript code that the video claims is a proper conversion...

class Money
    constructor: (rawString) ->
        @cents = @parseCents rawString

...CoffeeScript will generate the following, which is basically identical to @T.J. Crowder's answer:

var Money;
Money = (function() {
  function Money(rawString) {
    this.cents = this.parseCents(rawString);
  }
  return Money;
})();

I'm just posting this to show what CoffeeScript actually does, and that the video does not represent the reality.

You can see the conversion if you visit the site and click the "Try CoffeeScript" button.

Please do not "accept" this answer.


EDIT:

To add some private variable usage that utilizes the scope, you could do this:

class Money
    priv=0
    constructor: (rawString) ->
        @cents = @parseCents rawString
        @id = priv++

...which renders as:

var Money;
Money = (function() {
  var priv;
  priv = 0;
  function Money(rawString) {
    this.cents = this.parseCents(rawString);
    this.id = priv++;
  }
  return Money;
})();

By the way, I know nothing about CoffeeScript. Its syntax looks confusing to me, but perhaps just because I'm not accustomed to it.

I like JavaScript the way it is (especially with the new and yet to come changes).

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Nice one. So it's setting up a private scope as I mentioned, but not utilizing it. (And it's preventing deletion by using var, but hey, it was an edgy use case anyway...) –  T.J. Crowder May 13 '11 at 22:20
    
It's a lapsus then. The producer forgot to include the return Money; statement and the trailing (). –  Šime Vidas May 13 '11 at 22:23
    
@T.J. Crowder: Yes I assume it was just meant to be a short example. Actually using the scope would make more sense. –  RightSaidFred May 13 '11 at 22:27
    
@Šime: Yeah, those are pretty big omissions. –  RightSaidFred May 13 '11 at 22:28
1  
@Šime: Ganging up on me huh? ;) –  RightSaidFred May 13 '11 at 22:43
show 5 more comments

There are three things going on here:

First, as other answerers have noted, the code given in the PeepCode screencast and cited in the question has a couple of mistakes. There is a return, and the outer function is called.

Second, as T.J. noted, this is a module pattern. You can execute arbitrary code in CoffeeScript class blocks, and variables obey the same scoping rules as in other functions. So, for instance, you could write

class HashedPassword
  salt = Math.random()
  constructor: (password) ->
    @value = hash password, salt

in which case salt is visible only within the HashedPassword class definition.

Finally, it should be noted that this is the only place that CoffeeScript ever uses "named" functions (those declared with function foo() rather than foo = function()). Named functions are great for stack traces and such, but they cause inconsistencies between IE (< 9) and other browsers unless scoped in a module like this (see the CoffeeScript FAQ, heading "Is there any way to name functions, for reflection and recursion?"). So a secondary use of the class syntax is to safely declare named functions.

I hope that answers your question, Šime.

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Money = (function() {
    var uid = 0;
    function Money(rawString) {
        this.cents = this.parseCents(rawString);
        this.uid = uid++;
    }
    return Money;
})();

Another use case of this pattern is to have local variables that act as if there statically bound to the function.

This is subtly different from the module pattern because your adding static private information to a function. Instead of packaging data and returning an object which has some local variables in scope.

The other option for achieving this would be using Money.uid but that would be public.

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I'm the author of the screencast mentioned, and the source of the snippet. A few clarifications:

  • The context in which the snippet was mentioned was in an animated comparison of JavaScript and CoffeeScript syntax.
  • It was intentionally simplified so as to not add extra confusion in the context of the CoffeeScript concept being taught at that exact moment in the video (the video was not trying to teach JavaScript constructor or class syntax).
  • You can get the full JavaScript text of any CoffeeScript snippet by running it through the CoffeeScript compiler as shown in the screencast, or by running it on the official CoffeeScript website.

I'll add a clarification to the video and preview mentioned above.

Otherwise, the other explanations here on Stack Overflow are correct. If you're building a JavaScript class you should return the current object and call the anonymous function shown above. But that's not the point of CoffeeScript. ;-)

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