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If I have a struct like

struct account {
   int account_number;
};

Then what's the difference between doing

myAccount.account_number;

and

myAccount->account_number;

or isn't there a difference?

If there's no difference, why wouldn't you just use the . notation rather than ->? -> seems so messy.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

-> is a shorthand for (*x).field, where x is a pointer to a variable of type struct account, and field is a field in the struct, such as account_number.

If you have a pointer to a struct, then saying

accountp->account_number;

is much more concise than

(*accountp).account_number;
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You use . when you're dealing with variables. You use -> when you are dealing with pointers.

For example:

struct account {
   int account_number;
};

Declare a new variable of type struct account:

struct account s;
...
// initializing the variable
s.account_number = 1;

Declare a as a pointer to struct account:

struct account *a;
...
// initializing the variable
a = &some_account;  // point the pointer to some_account
a->account_number = 1; // modifying the value of account_number

Using a->account_number = 1; is an alternate syntax for (*a).account_number = 1;

I hope this helps.

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If myAccount is a pointer, use this syntax:

myAccount->account_number;

If it's not, use this one instead:

myAccount.account_number;
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You use the different notation according to whether the left-hand side is a object or a pointer.

// correct:
struct account myAccount;
myAccount.account_number;

// also correct:
struct account* pMyAccount;
pMyAccount->account_number;

// also, also correct
(*pMyAccount).account_number;

// incorrect:
myAccount->account_number;
pMyAccount.account_number;
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Thanks Rob, would accept your answer too if I could! –  Sam May 13 '11 at 23:26

-> is a pointer dereference and . accessor combined

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