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I am confused a bit about wait and notify/notifyAll.

I know there is a lock for every java object. I know wait will release the lock for other thread. How about notify/notifyall? Does notify/notifyAll release the lock it is holding for other thread?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

No -- notify/notifyAll don't release locks like wait does; the awakened thread can't run until the code which called notify releases its lock.

This is what the Javadoc says:

The thread releases ownership of this monitor and waits until another thread notifies threads waiting on this object's monitor to wake up either through a call to the notify method or the notifyAll method. The thread then waits until it can re-obtain ownership of the monitor and resumes execution.

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thanks , but according to my reading, notify/notifyall will wake up the threads that are waiting, if notigy/notifyall is not releasing the lock, how the waiting threads can pick up to test somehting already changed? –  icn May 14 '11 at 1:21
    
My understanding is that they must wait for the lock to be released normally. So if we did synchronized (x) { x.notifyAll(); foo(); }, waiting threads could not run until foo() finished. –  Daniel May 14 '11 at 1:25
    
@icn when the thread executing the notify exits, the lock is released so one of the threads it awoke can now acquire the lock. The others (if any) will block until the lock is available. –  xagyg May 19 '13 at 6:12
    
@Daniel Effectively yes, but to be precise, an awaiting thread could not run until the currently executing thread leaves the synchronized block (i.e. the last }) - which of course is after foo() finished (or anything else in that block). –  xagyg May 19 '13 at 6:14
  • wait( ) tells the calling thread to give up the monitor and go to sleep until some other thread enters the same monitor and calls notify( ).

  • notify( ) wakes up the first thread that called wait( ) on the same object.

  • notifyAll( ) wakes up all the threads that called wait( ) on the same object. The highest priority thread will run first.

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so notifyAll will give up the lock for other thread? –  icn May 14 '11 at 1:18
    
Yes sir, notifyAll() wakes up all waiting threads that are waiting on this object that they can run. –  Schneider May 14 '11 at 1:20
3  
notify() will wake a thread that is waiting on the object, not necessarily the first thread. –  Nathan Ryan May 14 '11 at 1:20
    
still want to clarify a bit, the thread including notifyall will realse the lock right away after calling notifyall or the lock will be realsed after completing the method that contains notifyall –  icn May 14 '11 at 1:25
    
The lock will be released just after calling notifyAll(). –  Schneider May 14 '11 at 1:27

I have to disagree with people who say notifyAll() releases the lock on the object over which waiting and notifying threads are being synchronized.

An example:

Consumer class contains a block:

synchronized(sharedObject){
if(sharedObject.isReadyToConsume() == false){
     sharedObject.wait();
}else {
    sharedObject.doTheThing();
    System.out.println("consumer consuming...");
 }

}

Scenario: Consumer class gets the lock on the sharedObject object, enters exclusively (it's inside the sync block) and sees that sharedObject has nothing ready yet (nothing to consume :) ) and it calls wait() method on the sharedObject. That way it releases the lock (stops the execution there!) and waits to be notified to continue when another Thread (Producer maybe) calls sharedObject.notify(); or sharedObject.notifyAll();. When it gets notified it continues from the wait() line

It's the sharedObject that keeps track of threads that asked it to be notified. When some Thread calls sharedObject.notifyAll() method the sharedObject will notify the waiting threads to wake up... Now, the tricky part is that a thread naturally releases the lock of the object when it reaches the end of its synchronized(sharedObject){} block. THe question is what happens if I call notifyAll() in that block??? notifyAll() wakes up the waiting threads, but the lock is still owned by the Thread that has just call notifyAll()

Look at the Producer snippet:

synchronized(sharedObject){
//We are exlusively working with sharedObject and noone can enter it
[... changing the object ...]
sharedObject.notifyAll();     //notifying the waiting threads to wake up

Thread.sleep(1000);           //Telling the current thread to go to sleep. It's holding the LOCK
System.out.println("awake...");

}

If notifyAll() would release the lock then the "awake..." would get printed out after the Consumer classes already start working with the sharedObject. This is not the case... The output shows that the Consumer is consuming the sharedObject after the Producer exits its sync block...

  • wait() - releases the lock and continues on the next line when it gets notified
  • notify(), notifyAll() - don't release the lock. They simply make waiting threads runnable again (not idle). They will have the right to enter when the current thread reaches the end of its sync block and the Thread scheduleder tells them that the lock has been released. The fight for the lock begins again
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To clarify my understanding and to provide an example for all to show when the lock is released, I have added print statements to the following code after the call to notify()/NotifyAll():

class ThreadDemo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Shared s = new Shared();
        new Producer(s).start();
        new Consumer(s).start();
    }
}

class Shared {
    private char c = '\u0000';
    private boolean writeable = true;

    synchronized void setSharedChar(char c) {
        while (!writeable)
            try {
                wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            }

        this.c = c;
        writeable = false;
        notifyAll();
        System.out.println("setSharedChar notify() called - still in synchronized block.");
    }

    synchronized char getSharedChar() {
        while (writeable)
            try {
                wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            }

        writeable = true;
        notifyAll();
        System.out.println("getSharedChar notify() called - still in synchronized block.");

        return c;
    }
}

class Producer extends Thread {
    private Shared s;

    Producer(Shared s) {
        this.s = s;
    }

    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Starting producer thread.");
        for (char ch = 'A'; ch <= 'Z'; ch++) {
            System.out.println("Producer thread getting ready to create a char.");
            try {
                Thread.sleep((int) (Math.random() * 1000));
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            }

            s.setSharedChar(ch);
            System.out.println(ch + " produced by producer.");
        }
    }
}

class Consumer extends Thread {
    private Shared s;

    Consumer(Shared s) {
        this.s = s;
    }

    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Starting consumer thread.");
        char ch;

        do {
            System.out.println("Consumer thread getting ready to read a char.");
            try {
                Thread.sleep((int) (Math.random() * 1000));
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            }

            ch = s.getSharedChar();
            System.out.println(ch + " consumed by consumer.");
        } while (ch != 'Z');
    }
}

When I ran this example enough times, there was a point where I did eventually see the output of the program show:

...
F produced by producer.
Producer thread getting ready to create a char.
getSharedChar notify() called - still in synchronized block.
F consumed by consumer.
Consumer thread getting ready to read a char.
setSharedChar notify() called - still in synchronized block.
G produced by producer.
Producer thread getting ready to create a char.
getSharedChar notify() called - still in synchronized block.
setSharedChar notify() called - still in synchronized block.
G consumed by consumer.

Since the output getSharedChar is able to appear before setSharedChar, it appears that the lock is being released immediately or not required to reenter the synchronized getSharedChar() function by the call to notifyAll(). The lock may still be in place, but if you can reenter the function without it, what is the difference? I was able to see similar output substituting notify() for notifyAll(). This was done on Java 1.7.0_15 on a 64 bit Windows 7 system.

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