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Okie. I can't believe this is happening but may be some comments from you will help.

I have a Parent class.

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;


public class Parent {

    Map<String,String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();


    public void process(){
        System.out.println("parent");
        this.checkFunction();
    }

    protected void checkFunction(){
        System.out.println("parentC");
        System.out.println(map);
    }

    public void init(){
        (map).put("parent","b");

    }
}

Now, as expected I have a child class.

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;


public class Child extends Parent {

    Map<String,String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();


    public void checkFunction(){
        System.out.println(map);
        System.out.println("ChildC");

    }

    public void process(){
        super.process();
        System.out.println("Child");

    }

    public void init(){

        super.init();
        (map).put("child","b");

    }
}

To test what I want, I have a main class.

public class test {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

        Child a = new Child();
        a.init();
        a.process();
        Parent p = a;
        p.checkFunction();
    }

}

When I call a.process(), I assume it should call child.process() which will in return call super.process(). So far so could. In Parent's process(), it should call checkFunction().

Now, as per my understanding it should call checkFunction() of Parent class. Why the hell is it calling Child's checkFunction().

My output is something like this

parent
{child=b}
ChildC
Child
{child=b}
ChildC

I expect it to be

parent
parentC
{parent=b}
Child
{child=b}
ChildC

What's wrong? ?

share|improve this question
1  
Calling Child.checkFunction is correct. This is the nature of Java's dynamic polymorphism. The target object of the invocation of checkFunction is an instance of Child, so its implementation of checkFunction will be executed. –  Nathan Ryan May 14 '11 at 1:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is because you have overridden checkFunction in the child class. therefore an instance of child will call the child checkFunction even if the call is from parent class.

If you want to call the parents checkfunction from an instance of the child you need to call super.checkFunction() in the child class. The super keyword essentially "moves up" the inheritance chain.

A detailed description of the super keyword can be found here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Ricick. I still can't believe this is right. This changes everything for me. Anyways, how would I call the parent's checkFunction() from parent's class. By overriding, I understand I call the child's function not parent's but what does parent know about child's function when the call is made from parent. Kindly comment! –  Kapil D May 14 '11 at 1:50
1  
Essentially you can't. If you want to make sure a parent method is called in a subclass, don't override it. By overriding you are explicitly saying "I don't want to use the parent method". –  ricick May 14 '11 at 1:56
    
just to confirm the data access in the parent function would be that of parent only and not the child. (just like in the question above) –  Kapil D May 14 '11 at 3:42

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