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Greetings all.

I am writing some code using the Boost Units library and have run into a problem.

I have managed to abstract the problem from Boost code so you won't be looking through reams of boost template meta programming. Though I'm sure if you have experience with that it could help. Here is the reproduction:

class Base{};
class Derived : public Base
{
public:
  Derived(){}
  Derived(const Base &){}
};

class Q {};
class U
{
public:
  template< typename Y >
  Q operator * (Y)
  {
    Q r;
    return r;
  }
};

Base operator * (U, const Base &)
{
  Base r;
  return r;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  Base myBase;
  U myU;
  Base myOtherBase = myU * myBase;
  Derived myDerived;
  Derived myOtherDerived =  myU * myDerived;
  return 0;
}

So the problem (specifically) is as follows: myU * myBase uses operator * (U, const Base &) and returns type of Base, all good so far. Whereas myU * myDerived insists on using generalised U::operator * (Y) and hence returns a Q, no good because I wanted a Base again.

Now, all classes other than Base and Derived are boost library classes so I cannot modify the members of U. How do I "beat" U::operator * (Y) for overload/template deduction/instantiation, in this case, in an elegant and "solved once and for ever" manner.

I am using MSVC++ 2008 in case it is relevant to anyone.

Edit: Added a possible (quite likely) solution in answers

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2  
+1 for small, self-contained example code. :) –  Xeo May 14 '11 at 3:32
    
What came to mind: does the Boost U class use SFINAE on the operator? –  Xeo May 14 '11 at 8:18
    
and you just learned that unfortunately inheritance and template don't mix well :/ –  Matthieu M. May 14 '11 at 10:28
1  
@Matthieu: it is definitely not true. They mix very well, since they solve orthogonal problems. Combinations of compile-time metaprogramming and runtime polymorphism can build great code. –  Alexandre C. May 14 '11 at 10:42
    
@Alexandre C: I agree, you can solve great problem, but having base classes and template arguments in different overload and get them to act as you wish may lead to a lot of head scratching. There are solutions, of course, but certainly not as immediate as one could think, rightly because of the orthogonality of the approaches :) I think I solved this one without too much issues, but still, it did took the OP several days to figure out the minimal example :/ –  Matthieu M. May 14 '11 at 10:49

6 Answers 6

Using the following should fix your problem

Base myOtherDerived =  myU * (Base&)myDerived;
// or
Base myOtherDerived =  myU * static_cast<Base&>(myDerived);

instead of

Derived myOtherDerived =  myU * myDerived;

This is not what we could call a "clean solution" though. I'm trying to find a better way to do it.

share|improve this answer
    
The obvious problem with that approach is the slicing. Maybe @EdF needs some virtual functions called through the base reference? :/ –  Xeo May 14 '11 at 3:52
    
That might fix it. However, the Derived classes in question are used massively, and casting every time would just not be practical for client code (which would hardly be aware that the Derived even have a base class, thanks to typedefs). –  EdF May 14 '11 at 3:54
    
@Xeo: Yes you are right. It will return Base and not Derived... –  Valkea May 14 '11 at 3:54
    
Truth be told the slicing is not actually a problem. Derived contains no more data than a Base, but I've never thought it a good idea to slice things even when "it couldn't hurt". –  EdF May 14 '11 at 3:56
    
@Valkea: A cast to Base& (note the reference) fixes the slicing problems though. ;) –  Xeo May 14 '11 at 3:56

First, the problem: The const Base& parameter of the operator* will always be a worse fit than the template parameter's exact fit because of conversion from Derived to Base.
Next, the solution: Provide overloaded operator* for every derived class. :(

share|improve this answer
    
@ Xeo: I noticed this just as I posted, I've changed it to const Base & which is how it is in the real code. It doesn't affect the outcome. I'm hoping there's a better solution than operator * for every derived class. –  EdF May 14 '11 at 3:35
    
@EdF: I atleast know of no other. Even taking the Base parameter as a pointer didn't help, which I thought might... :/ –  Xeo May 14 '11 at 3:42

If you have control over the ordering of the operators, you could define your operator* in the opposite direction, i.e.,

Base operator* (const Base& lhs, U rhs)
{
    Base r;
    return r;
}

Now if you tried

Derived myOtherDerived =  myDerived * myU;

it would not fit the template in class U, getting you around the issue of the template function in U overriding your own operator* function.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is, now you must do myDerived * myU and myBase * myU and can't change the order. I think the problem is that the overload provided by U is still a better fit because no reordering of the parameters is needed. –  Xeo May 14 '11 at 3:59
    
All the operators are defined both ways, in my code and the library's. I left these things out to keep the example as concise as possible, as it's already massive as far as elementary language issues go. –  EdF May 14 '11 at 4:04
    
Okay, well, it was worth a stab if you were just starting out, and didn't have an extensive code-base to maintain :) –  Jason May 14 '11 at 4:05
    
Appreciated, I've spent days on this problem already... It's only today that I've finally managed to reproduce it without the miles of template metaprogramming that it's embedded in. I certainly feel closer to the solution now that it's been reduced to its current form. Hopefully someone will have a massive brainstorm idea. Problem is there are so many ways to almost fix it. –  EdF May 14 '11 at 4:09
    
@EdF: Or really fix it, but with a massive maintenance part on your side to provide all overloaded operator* for the derived classes. :/ –  Xeo May 14 '11 at 4:13

Interesting issue. Templates and inheritance don't really mix well, and since you cannot fix U it makes for an interesting challenge for sure.

I propose to trump the overload deduction mechanism :)

The simplest way would be to provide an overload for each Derived class. Obviously it's impractical.

Unless we could use a helper class for which the operator is written, and mix typedefs in there to make it transparent for the client.

template <typename T>
struct BaseT: Base
{
  typedef T Tag;
};

template <typename T>
BaseT<T> operator*(U, BaseT<T> const&) { return BaseT<T>(); }

This should be preferred (as an overload) for any BaseT<X> because it matches more precisely than the generic overload proposed.

struct DerivedTag {};

typedef BaseT<DerivedTag> Derived;

Tadaaaam :)

And since BaseT is a class, you can actually specialize it on specific Tag arguments to have exactly the members / other functions you wish, and it'll feel exactly the same to the client.

Full example on Ideone at http://ideone.com/ZIudh, let's hope you do not hit a VS 2008 bug ;)

struct Base {};

template <typename T>
struct BaseT: Base
{
  typedef T Tag;
};

struct DerivedTag {};
typedef BaseT<DerivedTag> Derived;

class Q {};
class U
{
public:
  template< typename Y >
  Q operator * (Y)
  {
    Q r;
    return r;
  }
};

Base operator * (U, const Base &)
{
  Base r;
  return r;
}

template <typename T>
BaseT<T> operator*(U, BaseT<T> const&) { return BaseT<T>(); }

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  Base myBase;
  U myU;
  Base myOtherBase = myU * myBase;
  Derived myDerived;
  Derived myOtherDerived =  myU * myDerived;
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just as I gave up trying to solve this last night the answer hit me like a brick. The Q typed result of U::operator*(Base) is conceptually the same as the Base typed result of operator*(U,Base), even though they are being represented by different Types. All I need to do is provide a constructor for Base ( const Q & ) that accepts type Q.

class Base
{
public:
Base(){}
Base(const Q &){}
};

This makes my example compile. Now to see if I can actually write the desired constructor in the real version (where a Base is actually a Base<Q,...> and the Q we accept is a Q<Base,...>).

Unfortunately, presenting a simplified abstract example of the problem made it harder to spot this solution, so I had quite an advantage. Thanks go out to all who chipped in with ideas / comments and answers.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, does that actually solve the problem? This was actually one of my first thoughts, but I thought you couldn't do any useful construction from that Q. If it works, then congrats. :) –  Xeo May 14 '11 at 21:13

Using SFINAE for C++03 (boost::is_base_of is from Boost.TypeTraits):

class U {
public:
    template<typename Y>
    typename boost::enable_if<
        !boost::is_base_of<Base, Y>::value,
        Q
    >::type
    operator*(Y)
    {
        Q r;
        return r;
    }
};

An alternative way to do it with C++0x (std::is_base_of is from <type_traits>):

class U {
public:
    template<
        typename Y,
        typename = typename std::enable_if<
            !std::is_base_of<Base, Y>::value
        >::type
    >
    Q
    operator*(Y)
    {
        Q r;
        return r;
    }
};

A quick test indicates that your example seems to work with SFINAE but be warned that the two operators must be overloads for this to work: if operator*(Y) is the only operator that appears in the overload resolution set (e.g. because of ADL or because of where operator*(U, Base const&) is declared) then SFINAE will make it disappear (as intended) but overload resolution will end without a candidate.


As Xeo pointed out, the above doesn't help. To hopefully redeem myself, here's one last possibility:

in the example, the member operator*(Y) is non-const. If, however, it were const like operator*(Y) const as good style recommends, then you could provide a better, non-const match that forwards to your operator*(U const&, Base const&). This is brittle however: if your code uses a U const& then you will stumble on the original compile error.

share|improve this answer
    
The OP said he can't change anything besides the base and derived classes, because it comes from Boost. –  Xeo May 14 '11 at 8:14

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