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I have done RIGHT JOINS in the past with no problems. However, for some reason now, I am not able successfully join a date table on the date field. In summary, I have two tables. The first table has one date column and a couple more non-date columns. Then I have a date table, which just has two date columns.

I initialize this date table by inserting into it first of month dates for 13 consecutive months. But my other table only has 9 months of data.

So table A looks like:

col_A    col_B     col_C
-----    ------    -------
sfds     jkjlj     7-1-2009
rewr     sfsfsd    5-1-2009
xcxvg    sdfsfk    4-1-2009
...

But table B looks like:

StartDate   EndDate
---------   ---------
7-1-2009    7-31-2009
6-1-2009    6-30-2009
5-1-2009    5-31-2009
...

But when I right join table B onto A like so:

    SELECT *
      FROM TABLE_A A
RIGHT JOIN TABLE_B B ON A.COL_C = B.StartDate

I expect to get 12 months of data since Table_B has 13 months/records. However, instead I am only getting 9 months total. Does anybody understand why this would be? And other things I might try to achieve the same result?

My main goal is to make Table_A include every month for past 13 months, even if there are null values. Right now though, it just includes 9 months since there no records for the other 4 months.

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TSQL for Sybase or SQL Server? Version would help too –  OMG Ponies May 14 '11 at 3:47
1  
This is SQL Server –  salvationishere May 14 '11 at 4:03
1  
You sure the full version doesn't have a where clause? –  JBrooks May 14 '11 at 4:30
    
Can you give us all data in both tables and the actual query please? If there are 13 rows in B you'd get 13 rows out unless you've filtered them out with a WHERE or something –  gbn May 14 '11 at 8:32
    
i just added my full code –  salvationishere May 14 '11 at 14:41

3 Answers 3

Joining on date columns can be problematic if there is a time portion to the dates (and there often is!).

It's safer to use DATEPART() or CONVERT() (or other date functions) to extract just the date portion but this will probably exclude using indexes.

one way is to use:

DATEADD(day, DATEDIFF(day, 0, DateColumn), 0)

i.e.

SELECT *      
FROM TABLE_A A
RIGHT JOIN TABLE_B B ON 
   DATEADD(day, DATEDIFF(day, 0, A.COL_C), 0) = DATEADD(day, DATEDIFF(day, 0, B.StartDate), 0)

There is also this form:

CAST(FLOOR(CAST(GETDATE() AS FLOAT)) AS DATETIME)

but I prefer the former.

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Thanks, you just reminded me. The date column in Table_A is actually a CASTed date, where it casts the date into the first day of that month, but it still remains a date datatype. Thanks for the tips though. I am not at my work computer now, but I will try this tomorrow and let you know. –  salvationishere May 14 '11 at 4:02
1  
Even if they didn't match he should have the records since it is an outer join. –  JBrooks May 14 '11 at 4:27
    
@JBrooks: hmmmm, good point.... –  Mitch Wheat May 14 '11 at 4:29
    
Thanks Mitch, but I actually need the first day of month from Table_A. And your code just gives me that same day. How would I do this for first day of month? –  salvationishere May 14 '11 at 13:47
    
thanks i modified my description. Can u look? still < 13 months. –  salvationishere May 14 '11 at 14:43

I just tried this and got all months, columns col_A, col_B and col_C being null where there wasn't a match. Are you sure all your dates are there and there isn't a where clause affecting this?

SELECT *
FROM TABLE_A A

sfds    jkjlj   2009-07-01 00:00:00.000


SELECT *
FROM TABLE_B B

2009-07-01 00:00:00.000 2009-07-31 00:00:00.000
2009-06-01 00:00:00.000 2009-06-30 00:00:00.000
2009-05-01 00:00:00.000 2009-05-31 00:00:00.000


SELECT *
FROM TABLE_A A
RIGHT JOIN TABLE_B B ON A.COL_C = B.StartDate

sfds    jkjlj   2009-07-01 00:00:00.000 2009-07-01 00:00:00.000 2009-07-31 00:00:00.000
NULL    NULL    NULL    2009-06-01 00:00:00.000 2009-06-30 00:00:00.000
NULL    NULL    NULL    2009-05-01 00:00:00.000 2009-05-31 00:00:00.000
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thanks i modified my description. Can u look? still < 13 months. i removed the where clause in 2nd insert. –  salvationishere May 14 '11 at 14:43

What I usually do when joining on dates is to convert them to integers first since joining on dates (1) often gives unexpected results, and (2) it is slow.

I would do the join like so:

Select * 
From
TABLE_A A 
Right Join 
TABLE_B B 
On 
((Year(A.COL_C)*10000) + (Month(A.COL_C)*100) + Day(A.COL_C)) = ((Year(B.StartDate)*10000) + (Month(B.StartDate)*100) + Day(B.StartDate))

However it seems you really want to join the year and month since the date on Table_A is always the 1st. I would do that like so:

Select * 
From
TABLE_A A 
Right Join 
TABLE_B B 
On 
((Year(A.COL_C)*100) + Month(A.COL_C)) = ((Year(B.StartDate)*100) + Month(B.StartDate))

Hope this helps.

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