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How do I do OuterHTML in firefox?

Could someone show me a method using javascript with which I can get the innerHTML of an element including the tags?

P.S. No jQuery please.

Edit:

Best Method:

function outerHTML(node){
    // if IE, Chrome take the internal method otherwise build one
  return node.outerHTML || (
      function(n){
          var div = document.createElement('div'), h;
          div.appendChild( n.cloneNode(true) );
          h = div.innerHTML;
          div = null;
          return h;
      })(node);
  }

Thanks to @Joel below for the solution.

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marked as duplicate by Blender, mu is too short, Caspar Kleijne, Donal Fellows, Josh Lee May 16 '11 at 1:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
This looks very similar to stackoverflow.com/q/1700870/651744. Incidentally, what you want is typically called the "outer HTML". –  Joel Lee May 14 '11 at 6:16
    
Agreed. I'd check that question for answers, as they are virtually identical. –  Blender May 14 '11 at 6:18
    
@Joel Thanks for the link. didn't see that question. –  Web_Designer May 14 '11 at 6:20
    
No problem. That's why I gave you the terminology for "outer HTML". I found the SO answer via Google outer HTML. –  Joel Lee May 14 '11 at 6:23
    
I'm not sure that's a good solution. It creates a new function object every time it's called which is very inefficient. Also, if a browser doesn't support outerHTML, I'm not sure you can depend on its innerHTML following the HTML5 HTML fragment serialization algorithm. After all, innerHTML was a proprietary DOM property until HTML5 and there were some significant differences between browsers. You may be able to deal with the issues as an ad hoc function, but I certainly wouldn't depend on it as a general solution. –  RobG May 14 '11 at 11:34

2 Answers 2

The standard way is just to use the innerHTML property.

document.getElementById("element").innerHTML;

That will get you the full text of all of the HTML inside of the element. To get the element itself you use the outerHTML property.

document.getElementById("element").outerHTML;
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I want the content of the element including the start and end tags so instead of returning paragraph content it would return something like this: <p class="pretty">paragraph content</p> –  Web_Designer May 14 '11 at 6:15
    
Okay, modified it to include the element itself. –  Kyle May 14 '11 at 6:18

I didn't like the posted function so here's something I consider better. Note that IE has different handling of event listeners for the innerHTML and outerHTML properties (that is a general comment, it is not specific to the following), so be careful. There are also differences in the serialisation algorithms so you probably won't get exactly the same inner or outerHTML from all browsers.

The first version below is essentially a more efficient version of the one posted earlier, it uses a better test (in my opinion) for the existence of an outerHTML property and it is more efficient because it doesn't create a new function every time and re-uses the div kept in a closure rather than creating a new one each time. Note that it only does this for browsers that don't have native support for outerHTML, otherwise the temporary div is not kept.

The second version is to be preferred, it is very similar to the above but rather than getting the innerHTML of a clone, it uses the actual node by temporarily replacing it with a shallow clone of itself, moving it to a div, getting the div's innerHTML, then putting it back. The shallow clone is necessary so the temporary replacement maintains a valid DOM (e.g. might be getting the outerHTML of a tr which can only be replaced with a tr).

xLib = {};
xLib.outerHTML = (function() {

  var d = document.createElement('div');

  // Use native outerHTML if available
  if (typeof d.outerHTML == 'string') {
    d = null;
    return function(el) {
      return el.outerHTML;
    }
  }

  // Otherwise, use clone of node and innerHTML
  return function(el) {
    var html, t = el.cloneNode(true);

    // Don't make a new div every time,
    // use div in closure 
    d.appendChild(t);
    html = d.innerHTML;

    // Remove unwanted fragment
    d.removeChild(t);

    // Remove reference to fragment
    t = null;
    return html; 
  }
}());

xLib.outerHTML2 = (function() {

  var d = document.createElement('div');

  // Use native outerHTML if available
  if (typeof d.outerHTML == 'string') {
    d = null;
    return function(el) {
      return el.outerHTML;
    }
  }

  // Otherwise, use a placeholder and
  // remove node, add to temp element,
  // get innerHTML and return node to document

  return function(el) {
    var html;
    var d2 = el.cloneNode(false);

    // Temporarily move el    
    el.parentNode.replaceChild(d2, el);

    d.appendChild(t);
    html = d.innerHTML;

    // Put element back
    el.parentNode.replaceChild(el, d2);
    d2 = null;

    return html; 
  }
}());
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