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(Solution Note)

How to handle arrow key event in Cocoa app?

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(Solution Note)? –  user142019 May 15 '11 at 21:45
    
@Radek: It is a self-answered question. Eonil was storing the information here for later retrieval. –  Josh Caswell May 15 '11 at 23:00
1  
@Radek Yes this is a solution note. As I know, StackOverflow recommends self-answered question when I couldn't find fine answer :) –  Eonil May 16 '11 at 3:08

2 Answers 2

But, but, but...I don't wanna be an NSResponder subclass.

@interface AMonitorNotAResponder : NSObject 
@end

@implementation AMonitorNotAResponder
{
    id eventMonitor;   // An event monitor object; instance of
                       // private class _NSLocalEventObserver
}

- (id)init 
{
    self = [super init];
    if( !self ) return nil;

    NSEvent * (^monitorHandler)(NSEvent *);
    monitorHandler = ^NSEvent * (NSEvent * theEvent){

        switch ([theEvent keyCode]) {
            case 123:    // Left arrow
                NSLog(@"Left behind.");
                break;
            case 124:    // Right arrow
                NSLog(@"Right as always!");
                break;
            case 125:    // Down arrow
                NSLog(@"Downward is Heavenward");
                break;
            case 126:    // Up arrow
                NSLog(@"Up, up, and away!");
                break;
            default:
                break;
        }
        // Return the event, a new event, or, to stop 
        // the event from being dispatched, nil
        return theEvent;
    };

    // Creates an object we do not own, but must keep track
    // of so that it can be "removed" when we're done
    eventMonitor = [NSEvent addLocalMonitorForEventsMatchingMask:NSKeyDownMask 
                                                         handler:monitorHandler];

    return self;
}

- (void)dealloc 
{
    [NSEvent removeMonitor:eventMon];
}

@end

The Event Handling Guide gives some possible uses. Seems to be a friendly Cocoa version of the CGEventTap, or a way to bypass the responder chain for some specific purpose. There's a limited selection of event types that can be monitored, e.g, only key down, not up. The docs have the list.

Also available: inspect events going to any other application (without being able to modify them) using addGlobalMonitorForEventsMatchingMask:handler:. Like event taps, this method requires Accessibility to be turned on.

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The key codes are never going to change even if Carbon goes away completely. If Apple didn't want you to use it, keyCode would be a deprecated method, and it isn't. –  Nicholas Riley May 16 '11 at 3:22
    
@Nicholas: I think you meant to comment on the other answer. –  Josh Caswell May 16 '11 at 3:30
    
+1 for introducing the another method. Because Cocoa doc is saying the keyCode is Carbon value which is deprecated, I used text based method. But in the Quartz doc, there is CGKeyCode type. What constant value should I use for it? –  Eonil May 16 '11 at 4:54
    
@Nicholas Sorry I deleted my comment to rewrite before see your comment because I realized something like that. –  Eonil May 16 '11 at 5:08
    
@Eonil: I've been looking into this over the past few months. It's a thorny subject, and a couple of articles on it have disappeared from the web in the last year or two :( The only place that I can find the list of key codes in the official docs is in HIToolbox/Events.h, which, you're right, is Carbon. The other thing about them is that there's a set that are device-dependent and a set that aren't. VK_ANSI_A only corresponds to the character 'A' on a US keyboard; on the other hand, kVK_LeftArrow is supposed to be the same on any Apple keyboard. –  Josh Caswell May 16 '11 at 5:44
up vote 5 down vote accepted

See this code. I assumed the class is subclass of NSView.

#pragma mark    -   NSResponder

- (void)keyDown:(NSEvent *)theEvent
{
    NSString*   const   character   =   [theEvent charactersIgnoringModifiers];
    unichar     const   code        =   [character characterAtIndex:0];

    switch (code) 
    {
        case NSUpArrowFunctionKey:
        {
            break;
        }
        case NSDownArrowFunctionKey:
        {
            break;
        }
        case NSLeftArrowFunctionKey:
        {
            [self navigateToPreviousImage];
            break;
        }
        case NSRightArrowFunctionKey:
        {
            [self navigateToNextImage];
            break;
        }
    }
}

A view should be first responder to receive events. Maybe this code will be required to support that.

#pragma mark    -   NSResponder
- (BOOL)canBecomeKeyView
{
    return  YES;
}
- (BOOL)acceptsFirstResponder
{
    return  YES;
}

To use this method, the class should be subclass of NSResponder. See the other answer handling without subclassing NSResponder.

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1  
You also need to be a responder and be in the responder chain. Being a view that accepts first responder is a good way to fulfill this prerequisite. –  Peter Hosey May 14 '11 at 9:36
    
The key codes have been the same since the days of yore and aren't likely to change. See this informative article by Peter Hosey. The fact that they're only visible to us in a Carbon header doesn't mean much. CGEvents use them primarily, not the corresponding unicode. –  Josh Caswell May 16 '11 at 3:53
    
@Josh OK. I understood. But I couldn't find defined key code constant values. To use it reliably, some kind of specification is required. Can I know where the official specification is? –  Eonil May 16 '11 at 5:13
    
@Eonil: please understand that I wasn't saying there was anything wrong at all with your method. I just wanted to present a different one. –  Josh Caswell May 16 '11 at 5:41
1  
@Eonil: Just stumbled across a fairly recent Cocoa-dev thread which talks about the deprecation/non-deprecation of various parts of Carbon. It cleared a few things up for me; thought you might be interested. Summary is: GUI Carbon stuff is out, most everything else is still okay, documentation should reflect this but doesn't do such a good job. –  Josh Caswell Jun 25 '11 at 21:44

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