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I was just reading a presentation on python and I noted that the author had missed out the round brackets of the tuple for the items to iterate over, and it struck me that I might be inclined to leave them in. A quick re-read of PEP-8 gave no definitive answer, and I didn't want to 'fall-back' on the old "explicit is better than implicit" without some discussion; so ...

Which do you prefer? Which do you think is more pythonic in these two equivalent for statements (limit the discussion to its use in for statements).

>>> # Some setup
>>> x, y, z = 1, 'Hi', True
>>> 
>>> #Style 1: Implicit tuple
>>> for i in x, y, z:
    print(i)


1
Hi
True
>>> # Style 2: Explicit tuple
>>> for i in (x, y, z):
    print(i)


1
Hi
True
>>> 
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1  
What also struck me was that I had previously never thought about the alternatives? – Paddy3118 May 14 '11 at 7:03
    
The problem with "a small number of items" is that after the script has been modified once or twice, you find you've "a large number of items". – Johnsyweb May 16 '11 at 11:28
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'd go with Style 2, as you can actually understand what you are iterating over:

>>> # Style 2: Explicit tuple
>>> for i in (x, y, z):
        print(i)

Style 1 seems a bit confusing to me for some reason.

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I make a point to do neither. I've found that code readability improves if you assign the tuple to a descriptive variable.

For instance:

for name in relative_names:
    print name

vs

for name in "Tyler", "Robert", "Marla", "Chloe", "Lou":
    print name
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1  
I note that you had to expand the original x, y, z to make your point though ;-) – Paddy3118 May 14 '11 at 17:03
    
Not always . What if one had lists such as skinny, slim, fat, and obese. iterating over fat + obese might be better than finding a good name for fat + obese, assigning the variable then looping over the new variable - it can make more sense to know the detail when the detail is not complex, and it is only to be used once. – Paddy3118 May 14 '11 at 17:07
    
I did expand the original (x,y,z) to make my point, because all too often code expands beyond a simple (x,y,z), but if you are not writing complex or reusable code, as your second comment suggests, it's not really worth debating. – Cryo May 31 '11 at 5:15

I would always prefer:

>>> # Some setup
... some_values = 1, 'Hi', True,
>>> 
>>> # Style 3: named tuple
... for value in some_values:
...     print(value)
... 
1
Hi
True
share|improve this answer

In this case explicit is better than implicit, the tuple should be obvious.

I think there are bigger fish to fry though :) Anybody will know what you are up to in either case, and it's a tiny change.

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