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I have a function which connects to a url by httplib using lxml. It checks by xpathfor a certain pattern and if the check is positive it returns a string. But if the check was negative it returns nothing.

Now the situation is, that my function returns None. I call the function, check if its return value is not None and continue in the code.

An example:

def foobar(arg):
    # connect to page by httplib
    # check for arg in a certain pattern by lxml
    if check:
        return result
    else:
        return None

result = foobar(arg)
if result:
    # do stuff
else:
    # do other stuff

Recently I read, that this is a no go. How do I avoid such situations?

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Just remove else: return None part? –  YOU May 14 '11 at 7:28
    
You should propably use if result is None though. –  delnan May 14 '11 at 9:42
    
What is the difference between if result and if result is None? –  Aufwind May 14 '11 at 9:54
2  
Using if result is not None instead of if result (note the not) means that other boolean false values such as 0 or "" won't be treated the same as None, which is probably what you want. And if you want to be explicit in returning None (and there's nothing wrong with that) then an alternative for your foobar would be return result if check else None –  Scott Griffiths May 14 '11 at 15:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 21 down vote accepted

There is nothing wrong with returning None.

In most cases, you don't need to explicitly return None. Python will do it for you. This is an altered version of your foobar which behaves identically without explicitly returning None:

def foobar(arg):
  if check:
    return result
# If not check, then None will be returned

Still, even if Python implicitly returns None, there is a value in being explicit; Your code becomes easier to read and understand. This is a constant trade-off for which there is no general answer.

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It depends on why it's a "no go"; I haven't heard that. If it's just bad form, omit the "return None" (the else statement) altogether, and it will return None by default. If it's considered bad to return None, return 0 or '' (empty string) or False instead, depending on the type expected by the caller.

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or return False –  ypercube May 14 '11 at 7:32
    
yep, thanks. actually saw your comment after editing to add that –  jcomeau_ictx May 14 '11 at 7:34
    
I encountered this reading the book Clean Code by Robert C. Martin. He claims returning or passing Null is a source for Errors and NullPointerExceptions. And if you miss one check for Null the program would go spinning. I can't quote the passage here because it has too much Java code examples I had to paste with it to get the context. –  Aufwind May 14 '11 at 8:12
1  
That applies to languages in which you can get null pointer exceptions. In Python, None is actually an object, not a null value. –  kindall May 14 '11 at 15:50
    
@kindall isn't it more or less the same thing (null vs. None)? The "null"-object will remain dormant until you try to use it as the original typed object (null_object.foo()) and then throws a NullPointerException. And you those need the "is this null" checks everywhere to make sure it's not used. If a method can return None or Type you need (in the same way) check if it's None otherways (none_object.foo()) will be called and an Excepion will be thrown. –  SlimJim Feb 12 at 20:38

There are many styles of dealing with this, including using exceptions or just returning whatever you get, including a blank string. This is fine too:

def foobar(arg):
    ...
    if check:
        return result

result = foobar(arg)
if result is not None:
    # do stuff
else:
    # do other stuff
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