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For example I usually type paired braces first then move the cursor inside the block, what I expect should be like this:

....{
....█
....}

But vim automatically empty the second line since there are only whitespace characters in it, so the result coming out is like this:

....{
█
....}

How do I fix this?

(The dots are for space characters, and █ shows the location of my cursor.)

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3  
You should never have any lines containing only whitespace after saving a file. Additionally, I think it's not a bad thing that vim does not keep the whitespace in those lines when navigating away from them. – ThiefMaster May 14 '11 at 9:56
3  
It seems that you didn't catch my point. I don't leave those lines when saving files — I'll immediately add stuff after the cursor. I simply want to type paired braces first before I type the content in the block, but the process of this "auto-correct" (maybe) is really annoying making me retype all these whitespace characters. – trVoldemort May 14 '11 at 10:01
1  
+1 for great examples. I have the same problem when I yank a word then want to paste it on the line below, or if I yank a line and want to paste it two lines below, but with the correct indentation ]p – puk Nov 21 '11 at 18:11
    
@ThiefMaster except sometimes Python: stackoverflow.com/a/2728019/234593 – Kache Dec 11 '12 at 11:42
    
REPL-compatibility is not really something important though. Besides that, you could just use %cpaste in IPython – ThiefMaster Dec 11 '12 at 11:47

Don't worry about the fact that Vim strips spaces from an otherwise empty line when you leave insert mode. As others here have commented, this is a good thing. Instead, look for a way to automatically restore the indentation level when you invoke insert mode on that line.

The i, I, a and A commands all preserve the cursor position when putting you into insert mode. But check the documentation for :help cc:

["x]cc    Delete [count] lines [into register x] and start
          insert linewise. If 'autoindent' is on, preserve
          the indent of the first line.

If the autoindent option is on, then running cc on the blank line will switch to insert mode and restore the appropriate level of indentation, setting you up just as you want:

....{
    |
....}

Note that the S key is a synonym for cc (:help S).

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1  
Sorry, but neither "cc" or "S" command restores my indent level. I think in the doc, by preserve the indent it means the indent of current line, not that automatically decide the indent level from the context. – trVoldemort May 18 '11 at 0:48
    
I suspect that the Vim documentation isn't giving the full story. It mentions the autoindent option, but it might just as well be affected by the values of smartindent, cindent and indentexpr. Could you run set autoindent? smartindent? cindent? indentexpr? and report back with the output? When I run this in a javascript file, I get: noautoindent nosmartindent nocindent indentexpr=GetJavascriptIndent(). The S and cc commands work as I described above when I run them in a javascript file. – nelstrom May 18 '11 at 12:53
    
autoindent nosmartindent nocindent indentexpr= (I'm editing .c file) – trVoldemort May 18 '11 at 13:03
    
I've tried :set indentexpr=indent() or :set indentexpr=cindent(), still no luck. – trVoldemort May 18 '11 at 13:13
    
I came here to find a way to prevent Vim from deleting the leading whitespace as I have a tendency to quit insert mode before typing anything, but now that I know about S in this situation (which unlike @trVoldemort does actually work for me to restore indent), I think I'll use that.... thanks – Steven Lu Sep 24 '13 at 21:04

If you really want that (though I agree with @ThiefMaster), it's just a matter of changing the way you type it.

Here are 2 solutions:

Solution 1: If you like the arrow keys

Step 1 Cursor is "|". Type the {

{|

Step 2 Type Return

{
    |

Step 3 Type }

{
}|

Step 4 Press the up arrow

{|
}

Step 5 Type Return

{
    |
}

Solution 2

Step 1 Type the {

{|

Step 2 Type Return

{
    |

Step 3 Type }

{
}|

Step 4 Escape from insert mode

{
}█

Step 5 Type O

{
    |
}
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I've actually been using solution 2 these days. But thank you. – trVoldemort May 15 '11 at 8:04

Here are two other solutions: http://vim.wikia.com/wiki/Get_the_correct_indent_for_new_lines_despite_blank_lines

The first one might be useful. It's simple and effective:

:inoremap <CR> <CR>x<BS>

However, this makes using Vim's auto-complete (<C-n>) harder to use. It also clashes with plugins that rely on the default behaviour, e.g. supertab.

The second one, adding a custom function (see link for code) to your plugins or.vimrc seems unnecessary because using o (as described by @sidyll above) or O does the indentation for you: {<Return>}<Esc>O

Another would be to create a snippet template. That way, you could {<Tab> and then you won't have to type out the other keystrokes. There are different snippets plugins. (Apologies if I'm telling stuff you already know.)

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