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So I got a question about LEFT JOIN, this code returns different values for totalPoints depending on if the user got the group or not. (if user don't got group or event it returns the correct value)

I just want to grasp how to get the LEFT JOIN flow_has_vote ON flow_has_vote.flow_id=flows.id to work every time. I did a solution before with three query's, one that gets the group and event rule, one that checks if the user got the group or event considering the security and one to get the flow...

And I guess I could solve this by having two query's, one that gets the group and event rules and also check if the user got the group and event and then one that gets the flow depending on the user should have access to it.

Right now I'm getting every information needed in ONE query and then checking with IF statements if it should be printed or not...

So, my question is, is it possible to get the SUM(flow_has_vote.points) AS totalPoints to work this way? And do you know how?

And also I'm a bit curios, is one query the best way to work with this? Would it be justified to use two when you take into account performance?

 SELECT 
       flows.id AS flowId,
       flows.security,
       SUM(flow__has__vote.points) AS totalPoints,
       users.id AS userId,
       users.alias,
       flows.event_id AS eventId,
       events.group_id AS groupId,
       events.membershipRules AS eMR,
       groups.membershipRules AS gMR,
       user__has__group.permission AS userHasGroup,
       user__has__event.permission AS userHasEvent
    FROM   
       users,
       events   LEFT JOIN user__has__event ON user__has__event.user_id = '.$userId.',
       groups   LEFT JOIN user__has__group ON user__has__group.user_id = '.$userId.',
       flows    LEFT JOIN flow__has__vote ON flow__has__vote.flow_id=flows.id
    WHERE   
       flows.user_id = users.id AND 
       events.id = flows.event_id AND 
       groups.id = events.group_id AND 
       flows.id='.$flowId

And if you wonder what the SQL-statement is doing, getting the information for the flow(post), the information about the event and group that the flow is in, checking the user access to the group and event and also getting all the votes for the flow...

This is how the tables looks like...

FLOWS id,security,event_id,user_id
USERS id, alias
EVENTS id, name group_id, membershipRules
GROUPS id, name, membershipRules
USER__HAS__GROUP user_id,group_id,permission
USER__HAS__EVENT user_id,event_id,permission
FLOW__HAS__VOTE flow_id,user_id,points

This is the result I wish for...

+--------+----------+-------------+--------+--------+---------+---------+-----+-----+--------------+--------------+
| flowId | security | totalPoints | userId | alias  | eventId | groupId | eMR | gMR | userHasGroup | userHasEvent | 
+--------+----------+-------------+--------+--------+---------+---------+-----+-----+--------------+--------------+
|      1 | 2        | 1337        | 5      | Pontus | 15      | 2       | 2   | 2   | 4            | 4            | 
+--------+----------+-------------+--------+--------+---------+---------+-----+-----+--------------+--------------+

and one more example...

+--------+----------+-------------+--------+--------+---------+---------+-----+-----+--------------+--------------+
| flowId | security | totalPoints | userId | alias  | eventId | groupId | eMR | gMR | userHasGroup | userHasEvent | 
+--------+----------+-------------+--------+--------+---------+---------+-----+-----+--------------+--------------+
|      1 | 2        | 1337        | 6      | Kezia  | 15      | 2       | 2   | 2   | null         | null         | 
+--------+----------+-------------+--------+--------+---------+---------+-----+-----+--------------+--------------+

Enjoy your life ~ Pontus

share|improve this question
    
please post your tables structure and relationships. Some sample data and the desired result would also be very useful. –  Galz May 14 '11 at 10:58
    
Hope thats enough, relationships is given in the WHERE statement... –  Pontus May 14 '11 at 11:58
    
still struggling to understand what you are aiming for. You want to get ALL events in the result set, and under userHasEvent see if this user actually participates in the event? –  Galz May 14 '11 at 12:17
    
It would be very helpful if you can describe what you are trying to achieve (NOT as in "do it in one query", but rather as in "I want a list of events in which the user participates, under all flows, and the number of points he/she got in each event") –  Galz May 14 '11 at 12:23
    
Hum, I thought you could read my mind ;) well... I want to get out ONE post, the FLOW and to the flow the author of it, its connected through flows.user_id users.id, then I also want to get out the group and event where the FLOW is placed and the permission of the EVENT and GROUP, then also if the USER (not flows.user_id), but the $user_id has that group and event, then, last, I want to count the votes for the flow and its that part that don't work all the time. Did I make it clearer? :) –  Pontus May 14 '11 at 14:23

1 Answer 1

So, basically the main point (IMHO) is not to include conditions on tables you LEFT JOINed in the WHERE clause, since this makes the LEFT JOIN behave like an INNER JOIN.

Start with trying this query (although I am sure you will have to make adjustments as I am not sure exactly what you want as a result, more about this later):

SELECT
       flows.id AS flowId,
       flows.security,
       SUM(flow__has__vote.points) AS totalPoints,
       users.id AS userId,
       users.alias,
       flows.event_id AS eventId,
       events.group_id AS groupId,
       events.membershipRules AS eMR,
       groups.membershipRules AS gMR,
       user__has__group.permission AS userHasGroup,
       user__has__event.permission AS userHasEvent
FROM users,
LEFT JOIN user__has__event 
     ON user__has__event.user_id = users.id,
LEFT JOIN events 
     ON user__has__event.event_id = events.id

LEFT JOIN user__has__group 
     ON user__has__group.user_id = users.id,
LEFT JOIN groups 
     ON user__has__group.group_id = groups.id 
     AND groups.id = events.group_id

LEFT JOIN flows 
     ON flows.user_id = users.id 
     AND events.id = flows.event_id 
     AND flows.id='.$flowId'
LEFT JOIN flow__has__vote 
     ON flow__has__vote.flow_id = flows.id

WHERE users.id = '.$userId.'
GROUP BY users.id

Here, I LEFT JOINed everything to the user, and also grouped by the user. I have a feeling you will want to add columns to the group by (flows.id?, events.id?)

Also, you may want to turn some of the LEFT JOINs to JOIN, so you will get only users who have a 'flow', for example.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey Galz, thanks for the help BUT I still your SQL-statement don't handle the SUM of the votes correctly, and I changed your LEFT JOIN flows to JOIN flows to get the flow information, that is what is most important, but still, the SUM of all the votes gets wrong... –  Pontus May 14 '11 at 14:25
    
@Pontus - ok, I think we can work it out. In what way is the SUM wrong? As I mentioned, another thing you would probably want to adjust is the GROUP BY statement - you want the number of votes PER WHAT? Per event? per user and flow? per user and flow and event? I have a feeling that sorting out the grouping will get you what you want. –  Galz May 14 '11 at 15:05
    
well, the thing is that votes are stored in flow__has__vote and by user_id,flow_id and points, so in my mind, everything that you would need to do is to SUM (or actually COUNT) the posts for each flow_id... –  Pontus May 14 '11 at 15:26
    
@Pontus - so try GROUP BY users.id, flows.id –  Galz May 14 '11 at 15:33
    
I appreciate your effort Galz but that don't solve my SUM(point) problem, I'm going to use two query's instead and then just merge them... It would be awesome to solve it with one but right now I just need to get it going before Monday, I get back If I'm manage to solve it! :) once again, thanks for your support bro! –  Pontus May 14 '11 at 15:56

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