Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm implementing producer/consumer problem. the code looks like this:

void producer()
{
  // produce item
  // update some control in form
}

void consumer()
{
  // consume item
  // update some control in form
}

producer and consumer methods are executed in different threads from the one that created my form, so I can't update controls in form. I tried following code:

void producer()
{
  // produce item
  // put the work to be done in a queue
  this.Invalidate();
}

void consumer()
{
  // consume item
  // put the work to be done in a queue
  this.Invalidate();
}

So now I have to detect if the form has been invalidated. I looked in Form's event list, and the best thing I could find was paint event. I put the code that got the job done, and it works fine. The problem is I somehow doubt I've done this the right way although it works. I think paint is not the right place to do the job, as what I'm doing it not just painting. I was wondering if there's a better way to do this.

Edit -- Snippet for Invalidated event handler not working

public Form1()
{
  InitializeComponent();
  this.Invalidated += InvalidateEventHandler;
}
void producer(object o)
{
  // produce
  // put work in queue
  this.Invalidate();
}
public void InvalidateEventHandler(object sender, InvalidateEventArgs e)
{
  // Do Stuff to form -- Where exception raises
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Invalidate is intended to trigger a Paint.

What you need is to Control.Invoke() your own refresh method on he form.

Edit:

Your non-GUI threads should not even call Invalidate(), they can't touch the GUI.

You can write your own ProcessData() form-method and from the Prod/Cons call mainForm.Invoke(ProcessData)

Then ProcessData() is responsible for thread-safe access to the data and for Invalidating the GUI

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe I don't get it but how does that solve my problem with executing thread not being the creator? Could you explain? –  atoMerz May 14 '11 at 10:28
    
Invoke was created to solve that. –  Henk Holterman May 14 '11 at 10:30
    
Thank you, it worked. –  atoMerz May 14 '11 at 10:39

You can try to use new keyword to make your own implementation of Invalidate

    public new void Invalidate()
    {
        // place your logic here
        base.Invalidate();
    }

Aslo Form has Invalidated event wich is triggered after Ivalidate ends

EDIT:

public void InvalidateEventHandler(object sender, InvalidateEventArgs e)
{
    anotherForm.Invoke(new Action(() =>
    {
        // Do Stuff to form -- Where exception raises
    }));
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Stecya ARGH! yes it does have Invalidated event, but it's not displayed in properties window, idk why, I tried it in code and it was shown. But about using my own implementation of Invalidate(), no it won't work, because I'm calling Invalidate with a thread other than the one that created my form, so it would be the one executing Invalidate and I'd have the same problem. –  atoMerz May 14 '11 at 10:19
1  
Then using event is your solution –  Stecya May 14 '11 at 10:20
1  
Unfortunately, It isn't working, I don't know why. I added a new event handler to Invalidated event, and when it's being executed I get the same error about it being updated from another thread other than the one that created form. :( –  atoMerz May 14 '11 at 10:25
    
Can you show code snippet? –  Stecya May 14 '11 at 10:55
    
yes, post edited. –  atoMerz May 14 '11 at 11:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.