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I am writing a screen scroller for a game I'm making. There's a BitmapData object which holds the background graphic, yet I do not want to show/render it on screen all at once.

For example, I want to show only a 500x500 section of the data but the entire BitmapData is 1000x1000. I wanted to use the scroll() method to scroll the data but my problem is that I cannot restrict how much of the BitmapData is drawn on the Bitmap. I tried setting the height/width properties of the BitmapData to 500x500 (and draw all the 1000x1000), but any data drawn beyond the boundaries I defined is not really drawn.

Another option I considered is to store a different BitmapData object which holds the entire data, and then use copyPixels() from it to the one used on the Bitmap itself, although then I cannot use scroll() and have to use different methods to achieve scrolling.

Thanks in advance for whoever answers.

share|improve this question
    
Alright, I solved it myself eventually using the method I described above (copyPixels() according to the scrolling offset). My only problem is that I use more memory this way (due to using two different BitmapData objects that have the same data more or less [one is a cropped version of the other]). If someone got a better solution I'll be happy to hear. –  Indigon May 14 '11 at 13:54
    
As alxx says in his answer, you could use a mask, and eliminate the need for the extra BitmapData object. To scroll, you would move the background behind the mask (this is kind of the traditional approach in Flash, since before bitmap operations like copyPixels and such was added to ActionScript). –  Lars Blåsjö May 14 '11 at 14:33
    
Just throwing this out there because I haven't seen it mentioned, but side-scrollers nearly always use some degree of tiling, so that you're not simply blitting the entire backdrop on every frame, nor having your whole world as one huge bitmap. –  Adam Smith May 15 '11 at 18:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The best way to do this is to blit using CopyPixels(). Essentially you'll add a Bitmap object to stage sized correctly to reflect the area you want to display, and then you'll use CopyPixels to bring over only what you want to display at any given time.

var largeBitmap:Bitmap = yourLargeBitmap;
var displayBitmap:Bitmap = new Bitmap(new BitmapData(500, 500));
addEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, loop);

function loop(e:Event):void {
displayBitmap.bitmapData.copyPixels(largeBitmap, new Rectangle(X, Y, 500, 500), new Point());
}

Populate X and Y and you're set!

Edit: Yes, this require double the memory because you're essentially holding two bitmap data objects in memory at any given time - but honestly that's going to be a minimal problem. Especially if your bitmaps are so small, the memory footprint is negligible. What's nice, though, is that you are sidestepping any kind of object manipulation or display list jockeying - and THAT is where major performance benefits come in. Honestly for something this simple anything you do is going to work just fine - but if you're deploying to a mobile device, or end up making a larger background, or whatever, you're going to see performance increase from blitting over masking or scaling or any of the other tricks. This is generally held to be a Best Practice as far as I'm aware. /Edit

Note that a lot of gaming frameworks (such as Flixel, for instance) have blitting engines built in. You get much better performance if you blit everything as opposed to using the display list.

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Interestingly, while I thought this option would indeed be faster, after a few quick tests I found that beginBitmapFill is actually faster to compute than copyPixels (about 2x or 3x)... would you like to contrast this? –  Cay May 15 '11 at 17:10
    
Seriously? No, I don't have any figures to back it up I just know what I've read and been told. If you're using bitmapFill that's an operation on the graphics object, which gets to be really processor intensive quickly. I'd be really curious to see your findings - can you blog it somewhere? –  Myk May 15 '11 at 17:20
    
I just updated my answer... I'd be very interested if you can find different results or find something wrong in my tests codes :) –  Cay May 15 '11 at 17:49

Create shape, draw 500x500 filled rectangle into it and assign it to bitmap's mask property - bitmap will be clipped to this size.

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I would do:

//the rectangle you would like to draw
var rectangle:Rectangle = new Rectangle(100,100,400,500);

var shape:Shape = new Shape();
var matrix:Matrix = new Matrix(1,0,0,1,-rectangle.x, -rectangle.y);
shape.graphics.beginBitmapFill(bitmapData, matrix);
shape.graphics.drawRect(0, 0, rectangle.width, rectangle.height);
shape.graphics.endFill();

You can then scroll by changing the rectangle's position, or changing the matrix directly.

UPDATE: After checking Myk's answer, I was surprised to find (after fairly quick and loose tests) that beginBitmapFill appears to be actually faster than copyPixels. I'll leave my tests codes, so if you're interested have a go at it:

copyPixels (I get 15-20 fps):

var bmp:BitmapData=new BitmapData(1000, 1000, true, 0);
bmp.perlinNoise(100, 100, 3, 1, true, true);

var arr:Array=new Array();
for (var i:uint = 0; i < 50; i++) {
    var clip:Bitmap = new Bitmap(new BitmapData(500, 500));
    addChild(clip);
    clip.alpha = .05;
    arr.push(clip);
}
var t1:uint = getTimer();
stage.addEventListener("enterFrame", function() {
    trace(getTimer() - t1);
    t1 = getTimer();
    for each(var clip:* in arr) {
        var x:uint=Math.random()*100;
        var y:uint=Math.random()*100;

        clip.bitmapData.copyPixels(bmp,new Rectangle(x,y,500,500), new Point);
    }
});

and beginBitmapFill (I get 55-60 fps):

var bmp:BitmapData=new BitmapData(1000, 1000, true, 0);
bmp.perlinNoise(100, 100, 3, 1, true, true);

var arr:Array=new Array();
for (var i:uint = 0; i < 50; i++) {
    var clip:Shape = new Shape();
    addChild(clip);
    clip.alpha = .05;
    arr.push(clip);
}
var t1:uint = getTimer();
stage.addEventListener("enterFrame", function() {
    trace(getTimer() - t1);
    t1 = getTimer();
    for each(var clip:* in arr) {
        var x:uint=Math.random()*100;
        var y:uint=Math.random()*100;

        clip.graphics.clear();
        clip.graphics.beginBitmapFill(bmp,new Matrix(1,0,0,1,-x,-y),false,false);
        clip.graphics.drawRect(0,0,500,500);
        clip.graphics.endFill();
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
OK, I see some things I would definitely do differently. I'll try to find some time today to come up with my own tests and we can compare notes, but one thing I'll say is I've never seen this done with 50 bitmaps at a time. The general idea when Blitting is that you only have ONE bitmap on the stage, and all of your other logic is there to determine exactly what pixels should be copied to that one bitmap. Blitting to 50 bitmaps at once is not something I've ever encountered. –  Myk May 15 '11 at 17:53
    
Sure, I did it with 50 instances to benchmark rendering times... I look forward to your results. –  Cay May 15 '11 at 18:03

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