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I read in this blog, that making the new operator private is a good approach to enforce instantiation on the stack.

I am implementing a class that employs the RAII idiom. This class should obviously only be instantiated on the stack, so I am looking for a way to enforce that.

  • My question is, does this have any side effects that are not straight-forward to see?
  • Is it a good approach to enforce instantiation on the stack?
  • Are there any portability issues?

Thanks for your help!

EDIT

My RAII class just instantiates various parts of the framework I'm working on, so it makes no sense to do anything else with that class than creating an instance on the stack.

The goal is just to provide a simple possiblity to configure the framework and put it in a ready-to-use state, without having to instantiate 10 objects in the client code.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I am implementing a class that employs the RAII idiom. This class should obviously only be instantiated on the stack, so I am looking for a way to enforce that.

That is not RAII. RAII is initializing when constructing and de-initializing in destructors. RAII is about resources you control (e.g. data members) and not the lifetime of the "parent" object. Users of your type then again apply RAII to control the lifetime of what they allocate. For example, you can dynamically allocate a std::vector, even though vector uses RAII to make sure every item it "owns" is cleaned up.


My question is, does this have any side effects that are not straight-forward to see?

Yes, you prevent otherwise valid (at least as far as RAII is concerned) uses of your type.

void example() {
  shared_ptr<T> p (new T());
  // No RAII violation, still uses operator new.

  vector<T> v (some_initial_size);
  // No RAII violation, still uses operator new (the placement form is used
  // inside the default allocator).
}

Is it a good approach to enforce instantiation on the stack?

What are you trying to prevent? What is the use case? Anyone who uses new with your type either 1) knows what they're doing and needs it, or 2) will screw up resource management horribly no matter what you do. You hinder those in #1 without helping those in #2 by attempting to enforce this.

This is another way to state what Steve said:

This class should obviously only be instantiated on the stack, so I am looking for a way to enforce that.

If that is obvious, why does it need to be enforced?

If users will blindly use "new T()", what makes you think they won't blindly use "::new T()"?


The goal is just to provide a simple possiblity to configure the framework and put it in a ready-to-use state, without having to instantiate 10 objects in the client code.

#include <framework>

int main() {
  framework::Init init;
  // Do stuff.
}

Use this, or something very close to it, prominently in your docs' examples.

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I am writing a simple class that instantiates all required parts of a framework in the constructor, and cleans them up in the destructor. This is RAII as far as I know. But my question isn't about RAII anyway, I just wanted to give a context for the question. –  theDmi May 14 '11 at 11:44
1  
@Daniel M: And what in that relates to allocating on the stack or the heap in any way? What if I want the lifetime of your framework to be heap-based? –  Puppy May 14 '11 at 12:46
    
I removed all "use me correct" enforement in the class, as you suggested. I agree that some minimum of intelligence can be expected, after all we're all engineers... Thanks for your input in the topic. –  theDmi May 14 '11 at 14:54
1  
@Daniel M: Evidently you don't understand my point. If I'm using your framework, then it's my choice if I want it's lifetime to be bound to the heap or the stack. RAII is just the tool that allows me to bind it how I like. However, it's definitely not your responsibility to tell me that I can or cannot bind it to an object which I choose to place on the heap. My point is that a self-cleaning class has nothing, at all, to do with how that object's lifetime is chosen. And my comment does not show off. –  Puppy May 14 '11 at 17:55

This class should obviously only be instantiated on the stack, so I am looking for a way to enforce that.

I guess it won't be obvious to the users, if you have to enforce it...

The main drawback is that it doesn't work.

Even if the new operators are private, users can still accidentally use your class as a data member or a base class of their own class, and then instantiate their class with new. It stops them writing Foo *f = new Foo(); when they're supposed to write Foo f;, but it doesn't enforce that their use of your RAII class matches lexical scope, which is probably what you'd really like to enforce.

If someone wants to use a lock (or whatever) with dynamic storage duration, then they're either really clever or really stupid. Either way, if you let them create it themselves then you can't stop them getting around your restriction.

What you could do, is make all constructors private (including the copy ctor), then provide a friend function that returns by value. They have to write:

const Foo &f = GimmeAFoo();

which the standard requires will extend the lifetime of the return value as far as the scope of f. Since they can't copy the object, they can't make the value escape the scope of the reference. Since they can't initialize a data member or base class, they can't use the workaround. Note that they have to take a const reference, though, so it doesn't really work if your class needs non-const members.

They can still do something daft, like initialize a const reference data member of their own class like this, but the object itself won't escape the scope in which that happens. They'll be left with a dangling reference, just as they would if they took a pointer to something they shouldn't.

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2  
+1. Don't try to prevent complete idiocy, you can't anyway. Educate users of your class on how it should be used. –  Fred Nurk May 14 '11 at 11:34
    
Thanks for this thorough solution, I didn't see the two workarounds. Though I must say that I prefer the pragmatic approach of just covering the most common mistake, as Christian Rau pointed out. –  theDmi May 14 '11 at 11:46

Even if you cannot prevent others making the RAII class a base class or member of a dynamically created object, as Steve said, and you should always inform the users of your intended use of the class, it is still a good idea to make the new operator private to prevent the most obvious misuse.

As this is all valid C++ code there are no portability issues.

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2  
It is not a good idea to make operator new private. You prevent valid uses, such as with something like boost::optional or (with move semantics) a container like vector. –  Fred Nurk May 14 '11 at 11:36
    
Ah, I see your point. I thought vectors were a bad idea, but with the new move semantics it could perhaps make some sense. –  Christian Rau May 14 '11 at 11:38

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