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I have a simple header with some menu items:

<div id="header">
<ul id="menu">
<li class="item">
<a class='loginlinks' href='/signup'>Sign Up</a>
<a class='loginlinks' href='/login'>Log In</a>
</li>
</ul>
</div>

I am trying to change the Sign Up and Log In text colour to white using the code below but it's having no effect...the text keeps inheriting the global text colour of red.

.loginlinks a {
color: white;
}

What am I doing wrong here?

EDIT: I see my error, however even changing css to a.loginlinks did not do the trick.

RESOLVED All correct answers, I selected the reference to firebug as that ultimately helped me identify the problem. Thanks to everyone.

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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Best practice is to use color code (hex), not the name.

a.loginlinks {
color:#FFFFFF;
}

because assigning color by color name is now deprecated.

working DEMO

note: if you still have the problem then try to debug with firebug, it may be that some other property is inherited

Reference: http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG10-CSS-TECHS/#style-color-contrast

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1  
Deprecated? Says who? –  lonesomeday May 14 '11 at 11:26
1  
@lonesomeday i gave the links too –  diEcho May 14 '11 at 11:28
3  
Good stuff, +1. It's interesting that this isn't mentioned in a 10-year-younger document on CSS color. –  lonesomeday May 14 '11 at 11:31
    
OK - resolved. Using firebug allowed me to see where the red colour was being inherited from. Thanks for the help. Question: I thought specifying DOM element specific css would override any css that came before in the css...is this not the case? –  zee May 14 '11 at 11:44
    
That link was written in 2000. In CSS3 they decided that using color names in CSS is cool with them. –  Derek 朕會功夫 Jun 8 '12 at 14:52
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That says "a tags within elements of the loginlinks class". You want "a tags that have the loginlinks class":

a.loginlinks {
    color: white;
}
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try this :)

a.loginlinks {
    color: white;
}
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Why the downvote? –  lonesomeday May 14 '11 at 11:22
    
i first upvote then downvote :( see my answer –  diEcho May 14 '11 at 11:23
    
you will get more points when you give a more detailed answer. (compare lonesomeday's answer to yours.) –  Raffael Luthiger May 14 '11 at 11:27
    
Thanks, I will try to provide more detailed answers. –  dmitry7 May 14 '11 at 11:36
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that's because there are no .loginlinks a at your DOM.

In other words, check it again and you'll see that the class .loginlinks is attached to the a.

So, in order to meke it work, just use this CSS:

a.loginlinks {
   color: white;
}

EDIT: after reading the OP edit, the solution depends on how the "global" a are behing defined.

If the OP is "desperate" he/she can use the !important property, whch will override all other definitions.

Like this:

a.loginlinks {
    color: white !important;
}
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Change CSS to

a.loginlinks {
color: white;
}
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If I'm assuming your condition correctly then it will be solve like this

body {background:red;color:red}
#header a {color:yellow}
#header a.loginlinks {color: white }

See example here http://jsfiddle.net/pyNEe/

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