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I'm looking for a way to do following dynamically:

var q = context.Subscription
               .Include("Client")
               .Include("Invoices")
                Where(s=>s.Client.Invoices.Count(i=>i.InvoiceID == SomeInt) > 0);

I would like to build expression dynamically for the left side:

Expression left = s => s.Client.Invoices.Count(i => i.InvoiceID == iSomeVar); //!
Expression right = Expression.Constant(0);
var binary = Expression.GreaterThan(left, right);

Thanks!

UPDATED NOTES:

Please note: The end result must be

Expression<Func<T, bool>>

Simple version:

// To give clear idea, all what I want to achieve is to determine 
// whether specific record exists in reference table using known Path. 
// Ultimately I want to extend following function (which works great by 
// the way, but for simple operations)

static Expression CreateExpression<T>(string propertyPath, 
                                      object propertyValue, 
                                      ParameterExpression parameterExpression)
{
     PropertyInfo property = typeof(T).GetProperty(propertyName);
     MemberExpression left = Expression.Property(parameterExpression, property);
     ConstantExpression right = Expression.Constant(0);
     BinaryExpression binary = Expression.GreaterThan(left, right);

     return binary;
}

// And I want to call this function and get result exactly as shown below:

Expression result = 
           CreateExpression<Subscription>("Client.Invoices.InvoiceID", 
                                          theID,
                                          valueSelector.Parameters.Single());

// Where result will be: 
//       t => t.Client.Invoices.Count(i => i.InvoiceID == theID) > 0;

Extended version:

// 1) I'm using Silverlight 4, EF, RIA.

// 2) At the server side I have a function GetSubscriptionsByCriteria
//   that looks about it:

public IQueryable<Subscription> GetSubscriptionsByCriteria(...)
{
      var query = this.ObjectContext.Subscriptions.Include("Client")
                                                  .Include("Client.Invoices");
      var criteria = BuildCriteria(...);
      return query.Where(criteria)
}

// 3) BuildCriteria(...) function gathers Expressions and 
//    aggregates it into the single Expression with different 
//    AND/OR conditions, something like that:

public Expression<Func<Subscription, bool>> BuildCriteria(
                      List<SearchFilter> filters,
                      Expression<Func<Subscription, bool>> valueSelector)
{
    List<Expression> filterExpressions = new List<Expression>();
    ...
    Expression expr = CreateExpression<Subscription>(
                                   sfItem.DBPropertyName, 
                                   sfItem.DBPropertyValue, 
                                   paramExpression, 
                                   sf.SearchCondition);
    filterExpressions.Add(expr);
    ...

    var filterBody = 
        filterExpressions.Aggregate<Expression>(
                (accumulate, equal) => Expression.And(accumulate, equal));
   return Expression
           .Lambda<Func<Subscription, bool>>(filterBody, paramExpression);
}

// 4) Here is the simplified version of CreateExpression function:

 static Expression CreateExpression<T>(string propertyName, 
                                       object propertyValue, 
                                       ParameterExpression paramExpression)
 {
        PropertyInfo property = typeof(T).GetProperty(propertyName);
        ConstantExpression right = Expression.Constant(0);
        MemberExpression left = Expression.Property(paramExpression, property);

        return binary = Expression.Equals(left, right);
 }

So, I hope it's clear now why do I need Expression for the left side in my original post. Trying to make this as DRY as possible.

P.S. Not to make it too confusing here is why I think I need to do ёExpression.Call(...)ё: When I run following code and break it to see DebugView I notice this:

Expression<Func<Subscription, bool>> predicate = 
           t => t.Client.Invoices.Count(i => i.InvoiceID == 5) > 0;
BinaryExpression eq = (BinaryExpression)predicate.Body;
var left = eq.Left; // <-- See DEBUG VIEW
var right = eq.Right;   

// DEBUG VIEW:
// Arguments: Count = 2
//            [0] = {t.Client.Invoices}
//            [1] = {i => (i.InvoiceID == 5)}
// DebugView: ".Call System.Linq.Enumerable.Count(
//               ($t.Client).ClientInvoices,
//               .Lambda#Lambda1<System.Func`2[SLApp.Web.Invoice,System.Boolean]>)
//               .Lambda#Lambda1<System.Func`2[SLApp.Web.Invoice,System.Boolean]>
//               (SLApp.Web.ClientInvoice $i){ $i.ClientInvoiceID == 5 }"
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Here's a working program that does what I think you'd like. It defines a function that takes a path to an integer property inside a collection, and an integer value. It then checks whether or not that collection has Count > 0 of that value.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Linq.Expressions;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Collections;

namespace Test_Console
{
    public class Subscription
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public Client Client { get; set; }
    }

    public class Client
    {
        public ICollection<Invoice> Invoices { get; set; }
    }

    public class Invoice
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var subscriptions = new[]
            {
                new Subscription { Id = 1, Client = new Client { Invoices = new [] {
                    new Invoice { Id = 1 },
                    new Invoice { Id = 2 },
                    new Invoice { Id = 5 }
                } } },
                new Subscription { Id = 2, Client = new Client { Invoices = new [] {
                    new Invoice { Id = 4 },
                    new Invoice { Id = 5 },
                    new Invoice { Id = 5 }
                } } },
                new Subscription { Id = 3, Client = new Client { Invoices = new Invoice[] {
                } } },
            };

            var propertyPath = "Client.Invoices.Id";
            Console.WriteLine("What Id would you like to check " + propertyPath + " for?");
            var propertyValue = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
            var whereNumberOne = makeWhere<Subscription>(propertyPath, propertyValue);

            Console.WriteLine("The following Subscription objects match:");
            foreach (var s in subscriptions.Where(whereNumberOne).ToList())
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Id: " + s.Id);
            }
        }

        private static Func<T, bool> makeWhere<T>(string propertyPath, int propertyValue)
        {
            string[] navigateProperties = propertyPath.Split('.');

            var currentType = typeof(T);
            var functoidChain = new List<Func<object, object>>();
            functoidChain.Add(x => x);  // identity function starts the chain
            foreach (var nextProperty in navigateProperties)
            {
                // must be inside loop so the closer on the functoids works properly
                PropertyInfo nextPropertyInfo;

                if (currentType.IsGenericType
                 && currentType.GetGenericTypeDefinition().GetInterfaces().Contains(typeof(IEnumerable)))
                {
                    nextPropertyInfo = currentType.GetGenericArguments()[0].GetProperty(nextProperty);
                    functoidChain.Add(x =>
                        ((IEnumerable<object>)x)
                        .Count(y => (int)nextPropertyInfo.GetValue(y, null) == propertyValue)
                    );
                }
                else
                {
                    nextPropertyInfo = currentType.GetProperty(nextProperty);
                    functoidChain.Add(x => nextPropertyInfo.GetValue(x, null));
                }
                currentType = nextPropertyInfo.PropertyType;
            }
            // compose the functions together
            var composedFunctoidChain = functoidChain.Aggregate((f, g) => x => g(f(x)));
            var leftSide = new Func<T, int>(x => (int)composedFunctoidChain(x));
            return new Func<T, bool>(r => leftSide(r) > 0);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but the link you've provided does not relate to the problem I've encounter –  Max May 14 '11 at 17:06
    
Thanks so much for getting back on this, however the solution you provided still doesn't resolve the issue. I seriously need an Expression for the left side and I try to explain why in post above. –  Max May 15 '11 at 5:47
    
Ok, I get what you're doing now, good job explaining that better. I'm still not sure you need expressions and I'll tell you why. You're always using > 0 on your right side, so that's constant. If you were varying that, then you should make it dynamic. It's not better design to make everything dynamic. The best design, in my opinion, just solves the problem as simply and as DRYly as possible. I'll edit my answer, let me know what you think in a little bit. –  Milimetric May 15 '11 at 11:13
    
Thank you Milimetric, well, the code I've provided is very simplified, I just want to understand how to create more complex expression tree that works in specific scenario, there are so many samples I saw and tried from various places but none worked for me. –  Max May 15 '11 at 12:19
    
Ok, check out my latest. You can change it to be more dynamic where you need it, but it works as long as all the lambda related variables are defined inside the loop so the closure works as you'd expect when they evaluate. –  Milimetric May 15 '11 at 13:28

I think this should get you closer to what you're going for:

static Expression<Func<T, bool>> CreateAnyExpression<T, T2>(string propertyPath, 
                                    Expression<Func<T2, bool>> matchExpression)
{
    var type = typeof(T);
    var parameterExpression = Expression.Parameter(type, "s");
    var propertyNames = propertyPath.Split('.');
    Expression propBase = parameterExpression;
    foreach(var propertyName in propertyNames)
    {
        PropertyInfo property = type.GetProperty(propertyName);
        propBase = Expression.Property(propBase, property);
        type = propBase.Type;
    }
    var itemType = type.GetGenericArguments()[0];
    // .Any(...) is better than .Count(...) > 0
    var anyMethod = typeof(Enumerable).GetMethods()
        .Single(m => m.Name == "Any" && m.GetParameters().Length == 2)
        .MakeGenericMethod(itemType);
    var callToAny = Expression.Call(anyMethod, propBase, matchExpression);
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(callToAny, parameterExpression);
}

Calling it like this:

CreateAnyExpression<Subscription, Invoice>("Client.Invoices", i => i.InvoiceID == 1)

... yields the following Expression<Func<Subscription,bool>>:

s => s.Client.Invoices.Any(i => (i.InvoiceID == 1)) 
share|improve this answer

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