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When your XML input isn't encoded in UTF-8, the Unmarshal function of the xml package seems to require a CharsetReader.

Where do you find such a thing ?

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1  
Note to new readers wanting to accomplish such a conversion : I won't remove the accept for the answer that was the best one at that time but you'd better use go-charset now. –  dystroy Apr 16 at 10:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here's a sample Go program which uses a CharsetReader function to convert XML input from ISO-8859-1 to UTF-8. The program prints the test file XML comments.

package main

import (
    "bytes"
    "fmt"
    "io"
    "os"
    "strings"
    "utf8"
    "xml"
)

type CharsetISO88591er struct {
    r   io.ByteReader
    buf *bytes.Buffer
}

func NewCharsetISO88591(r io.Reader) *CharsetISO88591er {
    buf := bytes.NewBuffer(make([]byte, 0, utf8.UTFMax))
    return &CharsetISO88591er{r.(io.ByteReader), buf}
}

func (cs *CharsetISO88591er) ReadByte() (b byte, err os.Error) {
    // http://unicode.org/Public/MAPPINGS/ISO8859/8859-1.TXT
    // Date: 1999 July 27; Last modified: 27-Feb-2001 05:08
    if cs.buf.Len() <= 0 {
        r, err := cs.r.ReadByte()
        if err != nil {
            return 0, err
        }
        if r < utf8.RuneSelf {
            return r, nil
        }
        cs.buf.WriteRune(int(r))
    }
    return cs.buf.ReadByte()
}

func (cs *CharsetISO88591er) Read(p []byte) (int, os.Error) {
    // Use ReadByte method.
    return 0, os.EINVAL
}

func isCharset(charset string, names []string) bool {
    charset = strings.ToLower(charset)
    for _, n := range names {
        if charset == strings.ToLower(n) {
            return true
        }
    }
    return false
}

func IsCharsetISO88591(charset string) bool {
    // http://www.iana.org/assignments/character-sets
    // (last updated 2010-11-04)
    names := []string{
        // Name
        "ISO_8859-1:1987",
        // Alias (preferred MIME name)
        "ISO-8859-1",
        // Aliases
        "iso-ir-100",
        "ISO_8859-1",
        "latin1",
        "l1",
        "IBM819",
        "CP819",
        "csISOLatin1",
    }
    return isCharset(charset, names)
}

func IsCharsetUTF8(charset string) bool {
    names := []string{
        "UTF-8",
        // Default
        "",
    }
    return isCharset(charset, names)
}

func CharsetReader(charset string, input io.Reader) (io.Reader, os.Error) {
    switch {
    case IsCharsetUTF8(charset):
        return input, nil
    case IsCharsetISO88591(charset):
        return NewCharsetISO88591(input), nil
    }
    return nil, os.NewError("CharsetReader: unexpected charset: " + charset)
}

func main() {
    // Print the XML comments from the test file, which should
    // contain most of the printable ISO-8859-1 characters.
    r, err := os.Open("ISO88591.xml")
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
    defer r.Close()
    fmt.Println("file:", r.Name())
    p := xml.NewParser(r)
    p.CharsetReader = CharsetReader
    for t, err := p.Token(); t != nil && err == nil; t, err = p.Token() {
        switch t := t.(type) {
        case xml.ProcInst:
            fmt.Println(t.Target, string(t.Inst))
        case xml.Comment:
            fmt.Println(string([]byte(t)))
        }
    }
}

To unmarshal XML with encoding="ISO-8859-1" from an io.Reader r into a structure result, while using the CharsetReader function from the program to translate from ISO-8859-1 to UTF-8, write:

p := xml.NewParser(r)
p.CharsetReader = CharsetReader
err := p.Unmarshal(&result, nil)
share|improve this answer
    
This looks good. Thanks. I'll try. –  dystroy May 16 '11 at 5:47
    
@dystroy: To protect yourself and your users, establish an audit trail by including a clear acknowledgement of the source (Stack Overflow) and the author (peterSO) of the code. Include a full link to this question or my answer. Include a full link to my Stack Overflow user page. I'm glad you found the code useful. –  peterSO May 16 '11 at 17:47
    
Yikes. Is this still the best answer? Everyone who wants to read ISO-8859 has to jump through these hoops? –  offby1 Mar 25 '13 at 3:26
    
this should be packaged into a library so that other people can just drop it in to the xml parser. –  chakrit Feb 22 at 16:46

Expanding on @anschel-schaffer-cohen suggestion and @mjibson's comment, using the go-charset package as mentioned above allows you to use these three lines

decoder := xml.NewDecoder(reader)
decoder.CharsetReader = charset.NewReader
err = decoder.Decode(&parsed)

to achieve the required result. just remember to let charset know where its data files are by calling

charset.CharsetDir = ".../src/code.google.com/p/go-charset/datafiles"

at some point when the app starts up.

EDIT

Instead of the above, charset.CharsetDir = etc. it's more sensible to just import the data files. they are treated as an embedded resource:

import (
    "code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset"
    _ "code.google.com/p/go-charset/data"
    ...
)

go install will just do its thing, this also avoids the deployment headache (where/how do I get data files relative to the executing app?).

using import with an underscore just calls the package's init() func which loads the required stuff into memory.

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1  
Have an upvote but it's disappointing to have to have external resources for such a simple operation than this conversion. –  dystroy Sep 30 '13 at 13:13
    
Agreed. Probably just 'still early days for go'.. I'm pretty happy with "go get" though as it makes the whole thing pretty close to painless –  Jonno Oct 1 '13 at 1:23
2  
This should be the accepted answer. –  chakrit Feb 22 at 16:49

There appears to be an external library which handles this: go-charset. I haven't tried it myself; does it work for you?

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I'll try, thanks (for now I just made a trivial charsetreader working only for the ASCII reduced set and I'll try a complete translation as soon as I've resolved my other issues). But I'm surprised that go seems to consider that the world is made of UTF-8 today. –  dystroy May 14 '11 at 18:44
    
I think it's more a matter of considering UTF-8 to be the best internal representation for Unicode, and not having finished the libraries yet. –  Anschel Schaffer-Cohen May 14 '11 at 19:29

Edit: do not use this, use the go-charset answer.

Here's an updated version of @peterSO's code that works with go1:

package main

import (
    "bytes"
    "io"
    "strings"
)

type CharsetISO88591er struct {
    r   io.ByteReader
    buf *bytes.Buffer
}

func NewCharsetISO88591(r io.Reader) *CharsetISO88591er {
    buf := bytes.Buffer{}
    return &CharsetISO88591er{r.(io.ByteReader), &buf}
}

func (cs *CharsetISO88591er) Read(p []byte) (n int, err error) {
    for _ = range p {
        if r, err := cs.r.ReadByte(); err != nil {
            break
        } else {
            cs.buf.WriteRune(rune(r))
        }
    }
    return cs.buf.Read(p)
}

func isCharset(charset string, names []string) bool {
    charset = strings.ToLower(charset)
    for _, n := range names {
        if charset == strings.ToLower(n) {
            return true
        }
    }
    return false
}

func IsCharsetISO88591(charset string) bool {
    // http://www.iana.org/assignments/character-sets
    // (last updated 2010-11-04)
    names := []string{
        // Name
        "ISO_8859-1:1987",
        // Alias (preferred MIME name)
        "ISO-8859-1",
        // Aliases
        "iso-ir-100",
        "ISO_8859-1",
        "latin1",
        "l1",
        "IBM819",
        "CP819",
        "csISOLatin1",
    }
    return isCharset(charset, names)
}

func CharsetReader(charset string, input io.Reader) (io.Reader, error) {
    if IsCharsetISO88591(charset) {
        return NewCharsetISO88591(input), nil
    }
    return input, nil
}

Called with:

d := xml.NewDecoder(reader)
d.CharsetReader = CharsetReader
err := d.Decode(&dst)
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You should edit the original answer with the correct code. –  Nican May 8 '13 at 17:21
2  
Using go-charset is actually the best answer, so I'd rather peterSO's answer remain wrong to point people in that direction. (I only discovered go-charset after porting his code.) –  mjibson May 8 '13 at 19:29

There aren't any provided in the go distribution at the moment, or anywhere else I can find. Not surprising as that hook is less than a month old at the time of writing.

Since a CharsetReader is defined as CharsetReader func(charset string, input io.Reader) (io.Reader, os.Error), you could make your own. There's one example in the tests, but that might not be exactly useful to you.

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I saw the exemple in the tests, it's not exactly useful, indeed. In fact I failed to understand how this CharsetReader should work. –  dystroy May 14 '11 at 17:33

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