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Today I needed a simple algorithm for checking if a number is a power of 2.

The algorithm needs to be:

  1. Simple
  2. Correct for any ulong value.

I came up with this simple algorithm:

private bool IsPowerOfTwo(ulong number)
{
    if (number == 0)
        return false;

    for (ulong power = 1; power > 0; power = power << 1)
    {
        // This for loop used shifting for powers of 2, meaning
        // that the value will become 0 after the last shift
        // (from binary 1000...0000 to 0000...0000) then, the 'for'
        // loop will break out.

        if (power == number)
            return true;
        if (power > number)
            return false;
    }
    return false;
}

But then I thought, how about checking if log2x is an exactly round number? But when I checked for 2^63+1, Math.Log returned exactly 63 because of rounding. So I checked if 2 to the power 63 is equal to the original number - and it is, because the calculation is done in doubles and not in exact numbers:

private bool IsPowerOfTwo_2(ulong number)
{
    double log = Math.Log(number, 2);
    double pow = Math.Pow(2, Math.Round(log));
    return pow == number;
}

This returned true for the given wrong value: 9223372036854775809.

Is there a better algorithm?

share|improve this question
    
I think the solution (x & (x - 1)) may return false positives when X is a sum of powers of two, e.g. 8 + 16. –  Joe Brown Nov 24 '11 at 2:52
13  
All numbers can be written as a sum of powers of two, it's why we can represent any number in binary. Furthermore, your example does not return a false positive, because 11000 & 10111 = 10000 != 0. –  vlsd Nov 24 '11 at 3:09
    
best explanation for how this works :) thanks! –  Joe Brown Nov 29 '11 at 17:30
1  
My upvote brought the score to 256. Nice. –  Rob Kielty Feb 14 at 13:05
1  
@RobKielty 256 & (256 - 1) == 0. Approved. –  configurator Feb 15 at 16:10

17 Answers 17

up vote 660 down vote accepted

There's a simple trick for this problem:

bool IsPowerOfTwo(ulong x)
{
    return (x & (x - 1)) == 0;
}

For completeness, zero is not a power of two. If you want to take into account that edge case, here's how:

bool IsPowerOfTwo(ulong x)
{
    return (x != 0) && ((x & (x - 1)) == 0);
}

Explanation

First and foremost the bitwise binary & operator from MSDN definition:

Binary & operators are predefined for the integral types and bool. For integral types, & computes the logical bitwise AND of its operands. For bool operands, & computes the logical AND of its operands; that is, the result is true if and only if both its operands are true.

Now let's take a look at how this all plays out:

The function returns boolean (true / false) and accepts one incoming parameter of type unsigned long (x, in this case). Let us for the sake of simplicity assume that someone has passed the value 4 and called the function like so:

bool b = IsPowerOfTwo(4)

Now we replace each occurrence of x with 4:

return (4 != 0) && ((4 & (4-1)) == 0);

Well we already know that 4 != 0 evals to true, so far so good. But what about:

((4 & (4-1)) == 0)

This translates to this of course:

((4 & 3) == 0)

But what exactly is 4&3?

The binary representation of 4 is 100 and the binary representation of 3 is 011 (remember the & takes the binary representation of these numbers. So we have:

100 = 4
011 = 3

Imagine these values being stacked up much like elementary addition. The & operator says that if both values are equal to 1 then the result is 1, otherwise it is 0. So 1 & 1 = 1, 1 & 0 = 0, 0 & 0 = 0, and 0 & 1 = 0. So we do the math:

100
011
----
000

The result is simply 0. So we go back and look at what our return statement now translates to:

return (4 != 0) && ((4 & 3) == 0);

Which translates now to:

return true && (0 == 0);
return true && true;

We all know that true && true is simply true, and this shows that for our example, 4 is a power of 2.

share|improve this answer
36  
@Kripp: The number will be of the binary form 1000...000. When you -1 it, it will be of the form 0111...111. Thus, the two number's binary and would result is 000000. This wouldn't happen for non-power-of-twos, since 1010100 for example would become 1010011, resulting in an (continued...) –  configurator Mar 1 '09 at 19:15
33  
... Resulting in a 1010000 after the binary and. The only false positive would be 0, which is why I would use: return (x != 0) && ((x & (x - 1)) == 0); –  configurator Mar 1 '09 at 19:16
5  
Kripp, consider (2:1, 10:1) (4:3, 100:11) (8:7, 1000:111) (16:15, 10000:1111) See the pattern? –  Thomas L Holaday Mar 1 '09 at 19:18
11  
@ShuggyCoUk: two's complement is how negative numbers are represented. Since this is an unsigned integer, representation of negative numbers is not relevant. This technique only relies on binary representation of nonnegative integers. –  Greg Hewgill Mar 1 '09 at 22:57
3  
Because comments are finicky things (and may be deleted), I've added what is in the comments to the answer as an Editor's Note. –  George Stocker Mar 31 '10 at 12:31

Some sites that document and explain this and other bit twiddling hacks are:

And the grandaddy of them, the book "Hacker's Delight" by Henry Warren, Jr.:

As Sean Anderson's page explains, the expression ((x & (x - 1)) == 0)incorrectly indicates that 0 is a power of 2. He suggests to use:

(!(x & (x - 1)) && x)

to correct that problem.

share|improve this answer

return (i & -i) == i

share|improve this answer
2  
any hint why this will or will not work? i checked its correctness in java only, where there are only signed ints/longs. if it is correct, this would be the superior answer. faster+smaller –  Andreas Petersson Jul 21 '09 at 21:11
6  
It takes advantage of one of the properties of two's-complement notation: to calculate the negative value of a number you perform a bitwise negation and add 1 to the result. The least significant bit of i which is set will also be set in -i. The bits below that will be 0 (in both values) while the bits above it will be inverted with respect to each other. The value of i & -i will therefore be the least significant set bit in i (which is a power of two). If i has the same value then that was the only bit set. It fails when i is 0 for the same reason that i & (i - 1) == 0 does. –  Michael Carman Aug 15 '09 at 14:04
5  
If i is an unsigned type, twos complement has nothing to do with it. You're merely taking advantage of the properties of modular arithmetic and bitwise and. –  R.. Sep 4 '10 at 0:57
1  
This doesn't work if i==0 (returns (0&0==0) which is true). It should be return i && ( (i&-i)==i ) –  bobobobo Nov 14 '11 at 16:59

I wrote an article about this recently at http://www.exploringbinary.com/ten-ways-to-check-if-an-integer-is-a-power-of-two-in-c/. It covers bit counting, how to use logarithms correctly, the classic "x && !(x & (x - 1))" check, and others.

share|improve this answer
bool IsPowerOfTwo(ulong x)
{
    return x > 0 && (x & (x - 1)) == 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
@Carl: No. 2^0 = 1. –  Matt Howells May 2 '12 at 15:09

Here's a simple C++ solution:

bool IsPowerOfTwo( unsigned int i )
{
    return std::bitset<32>(i).count() == 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think C# defines std::bitset... –  configurator Aug 25 '10 at 21:40
1  
@configurator You're right! But this is C++... –  Humphrey Bogart Aug 26 '10 at 14:45
    
It's also the slowest solution I've seen... –  R.. Sep 4 '10 at 0:59
4  
on gcc this compiles down to a single gcc builtin called __builtin_popcount. Unfortunately, one family of processors doesn't yet have a single assembly instruction to do this (x86), so instead it's the fastest method for bit counting. On any other architecture this is a single assembly instruction. –  deft_code Sep 4 '10 at 18:11

After posting the question I thought of the following solution:

We need to check if exactly one of the binary digits is one. So we simply shift the number right one digit at a time, and return true if it equals 1. If at any point we come by an odd number ((number & 1) == 1), we know the result is false. This proved (using a benchmark) slightly faster than the original method for (large) true values and much faster for false or small values.

private static bool IsPowerOfTwo(ulong number)
{
    while (number != 0)
    {
        if (number == 1)
            return true;

        if ((number & 1) == 1)
            // number is an odd number and not 1 - so it's not a power of two.
            return false;

        number = number >> 1;
    }
    return false;
}


Of course, Greg's solution is much better.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, much easier to read! –  jocken Sep 1 at 1:55
bool IsPowerOfTwo( ulong number )
{
   if( i == 0 ) return false;
   ulong minus1 = i -1;
   return (i|minus1) == (i^minus1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is basically the same as (i != 0) && ((i & (i-1)) == 0) ? –  configurator Aug 25 '10 at 21:41
bool isPow2 = ((x & ~(x-1))==x)? x : 0;
share|improve this answer
1  
Is this c#? I guess this is c++ as x is returned as a bool. –  Protron Sep 3 '10 at 18:58
1  
I did write it as C++. To make it C# is trivial: bool isPow2 = ((x & ~(x-1))==x)? x!=0 : false; –  abelenky Sep 3 '10 at 19:05
    
This should also work with C99 bool, but it's ugly. –  R.. Sep 4 '10 at 0:58

Find if the given number is a power of 2.

#include <math.h>

int main(void)
{
    int n,logval,powval;
    printf("Enter a number to find whether it is s power of 2\n");
    scanf("%d",&n);
    logval=log(n)/log(2);
    powval=pow(2,logval);

    if(powval==n)
        printf("The number is a power of 2");
    else
        printf("The number is not a power of 2");

    getch();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Or, in C#: return x == Math.Pow(2, Math.Log(x, 2)); –  configurator Apr 1 '10 at 3:43
2  
Broken. Suffers from major floating point rounding issues. Use frexp rather than nasty log stuff if you want to use floating point. –  R.. Sep 4 '10 at 1:00
1  
On my machine this is wrong 1,529,257,049 times! :) –  Adam Burry Oct 24 '13 at 19:21
    bool IsPowerOfTwo(int n)
    {
        if (n > 1)
        {
            while (n%2 == 0)
            {
                n >>= 1;
            }
        }
        return n == 1;
    }

And here's a general algorithm for finding out if a number is a power of another number.

    bool IsPowerOf(int n,int b)
    {
        if (n > 1)
        {
            while (n % b == 0)
            {
                n /= b;
            }
        }
        return n == 1;
    }
share|improve this answer

A number is a power of 2 if it contains only 1 set bit. We can use this property and the generic function countSetBits to find if a number is power of 2 or not.

This is a C++ program:

int countSetBits(int n)
{
        int c = 0;
        while(n)
        {
                c += 1;
                n  = n & (n-1);
        }
        return c;
}

bool isPowerOfTwo(int n)
{        
        return (countSetBits(n)==1);
}
int main()
{
    int i, val[] = {0,1,2,3,4,5,15,16,22,32,38,64,70};
    for(i=0; i<sizeof(val)/sizeof(val[0]); i++)
        printf("Num:%d\tSet Bits:%d\t is power of two: %d\n",val[i], countSetBits(val[i]), isPowerOfTwo(val[i]));
    return 0;
}

We dont need to check explicitly for 0 being a Power of 2, as it returns False for 0 as well.

OUTPUT

Num:0   Set Bits:0   is power of two: 0
Num:1   Set Bits:1   is power of two: 1
Num:2   Set Bits:1   is power of two: 1
Num:3   Set Bits:2   is power of two: 0
Num:4   Set Bits:1   is power of two: 1
Num:5   Set Bits:2   is power of two: 0
Num:15  Set Bits:4   is power of two: 0
Num:16  Set Bits:1   is power of two: 1
Num:22  Set Bits:3   is power of two: 0
Num:32  Set Bits:1   is power of two: 1
Num:38  Set Bits:3   is power of two: 0
Num:64  Set Bits:1   is power of two: 1
Num:70  Set Bits:3   is power of two: 0
share|improve this answer
    
returning c as an 'int' when the function has a return type of 'ulong'? Using a while instead of an if? I personally can't see a reason but it would seem to work. EDIT:- no ... it will return 1 for anything greater than 0!? –  James Khoury Jan 13 '12 at 2:08
    
@JamesKhoury I was writing a c++ program so I mistakingly returned an int. However that was a small typos and didn't deserved a downvote. But I fail to understand the reasoning for the rest of your comment "using while instead of if" and "it will return 1 for anything greater than 0". I added the main stub to check the output. AFAIK its the expected output. Correct me if I am wrong. –  jerrymouse Jan 13 '12 at 6:56
bool isPowerOfTwo(int x_)
{
  register int bitpos, bitpos2;
  asm ("bsrl %1,%0": "+r" (bitpos):"rm" (x_));
  asm ("bsfl %1,%0": "+r" (bitpos2):"rm" (x_));
  return bitpos > 0 && bitpos == bitpos2;
}
share|improve this answer

Here is another method I devised, in this case using | instead of & :

bool is_power_of_2(ulong x) {
    if(x ==  (1 << (sizeof(ulong)*8 -1) ) return true;
    return (x > 0) && (x<<1 == (x|(x-1)) +1));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Do you need the (x > 0) bit here? –  configurator Apr 25 '13 at 17:31
    
@configurator, yes, otherwise is_power_of_2(0) would return true –  Chethan Apr 26 '13 at 9:17
int isPowerOfTwo(unsigned int x)
{
    return ((x != 0) && ((x & (~x + 1)) == x));
}

This is really fast. It takes about 6 minutes and 43 seconds to check all 2^32 integers.

share|improve this answer
2  
This answer is pretty much identical to stackoverflow.com/a/3638615/9536 –  configurator Sep 20 '12 at 0:24
return ((x != 0) && !(x & (x - 1)));

If x is a power of two, its lone 1 bit is in position n. This means x – 1 has a 0 in position n. To see why, recall how a binary subtraction works. When subtracting 1 from x, the borrow propagates all the way to position n; bit n becomes 0 and all lower bits become 1. Now, since x has no 1 bits in common with x – 1, x & (x – 1) is 0, and !(x & (x – 1)) is true.

share|improve this answer
private static bool IsPowerOfTwo(ulong x)
{
    var l = Math.Log(x, 2);
    return (l == Math.Floor(l));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Try that for the number 9223372036854775809. Does it work? I'd think not, because of rounding errors. –  configurator Jul 22 '09 at 14:39
1  
@configurator 922337203685477580_9_ doesn't look like a power of 2 to me ;) –  Kirschstein Mar 31 '10 at 13:32
1  
@Kirschstein: that number gave him a false positive. –  Erich Mirabal Mar 31 '10 at 13:42
5  
Kirschstein: It doesn't look like one to me either. It does look like one to the function though... –  configurator Apr 1 '10 at 3:44

protected by Will Dec 24 '12 at 22:00

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