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Please see the attached screenshot which illustrates a TToolBar from one of my programs:

enter image description here

Notice the last two images of the Toolbar, they are disabled. The way they have been drawn to appear disabled is not very appealing, in fact in the Delphi IDE some of the images look the same.

The issue I have with it is I want my application to look a lot cleaner. The way the disabled items are drawn doesn't look very good. The TToolBar allows to set a disabled TImageList, I tried making my images black & white but they didn't look right, and would rather not have to always make the images black and white (time and effort). This problem also shows in my menus and popup menus, which don't allow for disabled images anyway.

Is there a way to paint the disabled items to look better on the eye?

If possible I would rather not look to use 3rd Party Controls. I know the Jedi Components allow disabled images for the menu etc, but would prefer a way to not resort too 3rd Party Components, when possible I would much prefer to use the standard issue VCL, especially as sometimes I use the TActionMainMenuBar to draw Office Style menus, which match the TToolBar when DrawingStyle is set to gradient.

EDIT

I have accepted RRUZ's answer, is it possible though to accept David's answer as well, both are very good answers and would like the answer to be shared between them if possible.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
5  
I think it is good the way it is. Any 'improvement' will confuse the user. For example, when comparing the default and the new looks of the Delphi IDE using the 'IDE fix' suggested below, I find the default appearance far superior. In the first screenshot, I immediately can idefinity disabled toolbar buttons and menu items, but in the second screenshot, I need to think for almost a second before I can determine if a button/item is enabled or disabled. That's bad... –  Andreas Rejbrand May 14 '11 at 16:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Sometime Ago i wrote a patch to fix this behavior. the key is patch the code of the TCustomImageList.DoDraw function, the technique used is similar to the used by the delphi-nice-toolbar app, but instead of patch a bpl IDE in this case we patch the function in memory.

Just include this unit in your project

unit uCustomImageDrawHook;

interface

uses
  Windows,
  SysUtils,
  Graphics,
  ImgList,
  CommCtrl,
  Math;

implementation

type
  TJumpOfs = Integer;
  PPointer = ^Pointer;

  PXRedirCode = ^TXRedirCode;
  TXRedirCode = packed record
    Jump: Byte;
    Offset: TJumpOfs;
  end;

  PAbsoluteIndirectJmp = ^TAbsoluteIndirectJmp;
  TAbsoluteIndirectJmp = packed record
    OpCode: Word;
    Addr: PPointer;
  end;


  TCustomImageListHack = class(TCustomImageList);

var
  DoDrawBackup   : TXRedirCode;

function GetActualAddr(Proc: Pointer): Pointer;
begin
  if Proc <> nil then
  begin
    if (Win32Platform = VER_PLATFORM_WIN32_NT) and (PAbsoluteIndirectJmp(Proc).OpCode = $25FF) then
      Result := PAbsoluteIndirectJmp(Proc).Addr^
    else
      Result := Proc;
  end
  else
    Result := nil;
end;

procedure HookProc(Proc, Dest: Pointer; var BackupCode: TXRedirCode);
var
  n: DWORD;
  Code: TXRedirCode;
begin
  Proc := GetActualAddr(Proc);
  Assert(Proc <> nil);
  if ReadProcessMemory(GetCurrentProcess, Proc, @BackupCode, SizeOf(BackupCode), n) then
  begin
    Code.Jump := $E9;
    Code.Offset := PAnsiChar(Dest) - PAnsiChar(Proc) - SizeOf(Code);
    WriteProcessMemory(GetCurrentProcess, Proc, @Code, SizeOf(Code), n);
  end;
end;

procedure UnhookProc(Proc: Pointer; var BackupCode: TXRedirCode);
var
  n: Cardinal;
begin
  if (BackupCode.Jump <> 0) and (Proc <> nil) then
  begin
    Proc := GetActualAddr(Proc);
    Assert(Proc <> nil);
    WriteProcessMemory(GetCurrentProcess, Proc, @BackupCode, SizeOf(BackupCode), n);
    BackupCode.Jump := 0;
  end;
end;


procedure Bitmap2GrayScale(const BitMap: TBitmap);
type
  TRGBArray = array[0..32767] of TRGBTriple;
  PRGBArray = ^TRGBArray;
var
  x, y, Gray: Integer;
  Row       : PRGBArray;
begin
  BitMap.PixelFormat := pf24Bit;
  for y := 0 to BitMap.Height - 1 do
  begin
    Row := BitMap.ScanLine[y];
    for x := 0 to BitMap.Width - 1 do
    begin
      Gray             := (Row[x].rgbtRed + Row[x].rgbtGreen + Row[x].rgbtBlue) div 3;
      Row[x].rgbtRed   := Gray;
      Row[x].rgbtGreen := Gray;
      Row[x].rgbtBlue  := Gray;
    end;
  end;
end;


//from ImgList.GetRGBColor
function GetRGBColor(Value: TColor): DWORD;
begin
  Result := ColorToRGB(Value);
  case Result of
    clNone:
      Result := CLR_NONE;
    clDefault:
      Result := CLR_DEFAULT;
  end;
end;


procedure New_Draw(Self: TObject; Index: Integer; Canvas: TCanvas; X, Y: Integer; Style: Cardinal; Enabled: Boolean);
var
  MaskBitMap : TBitmap;
  GrayBitMap : TBitmap;
begin
  with TCustomImageListHack(Self) do
  begin
    if not HandleAllocated then Exit;
    if Enabled then
      ImageList_DrawEx(Handle, Index, Canvas.Handle, X, Y, 0, 0, GetRGBColor(BkColor), GetRGBColor(BlendColor), Style)
    else
    begin
      GrayBitMap := TBitmap.Create;
      MaskBitMap := TBitmap.Create;
      try
        GrayBitMap.SetSize(Width, Height);
        MaskBitMap.SetSize(Width, Height);
        GetImages(Index, GrayBitMap, MaskBitMap);
        Bitmap2GrayScale(GrayBitMap);
        BitBlt(Canvas.Handle, X, Y, Width, Height, MaskBitMap.Canvas.Handle, 0, 0, SRCERASE);
        BitBlt(Canvas.Handle, X, Y, Width, Height, GrayBitMap.Canvas.Handle, 0, 0, SRCINVERT);
      finally
        GrayBitMap.Free;
        MaskBitMap.Free;
      end;
    end;
  end;
end;

procedure HookDraw;
begin
  HookProc(@TCustomImageListHack.DoDraw, @New_Draw, DoDrawBackup);
end;

procedure UnHookDraw;
begin
  UnhookProc(@TCustomImageListHack.DoDraw, DoDrawBackup);
end;


initialization
 HookDraw;
finalization
 UnHookDraw;
end.

and the result will be

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
@RRUZ, this is very good. It allows the images to become grayscaled without actually having to mess around editing the images (which I use Paint.Net to do). Both you and David have provided good solutions. –  user741875 May 14 '11 at 18:00
6  
Wouldn't it be lovely if Embarcadero could just sort this out in their code base?! –  David Heffernan May 14 '11 at 18:03
2  
I still think it is hard to distinguish the disabled items from the enabled ones... –  Andreas Rejbrand May 14 '11 at 18:07
1  
@Andreas , I can see clearly the difference ;) –  RRUZ May 14 '11 at 18:12
1  
@Craig Looks are important. Have you noticed the bug in the implementation of menus whereby highlighted glyphs (i.e. hot track) are drawn differently from when the highlight is elsewhere. qc.embarcadero.com/wc/qcmain.aspx?d=86876 –  David Heffernan May 14 '11 at 19:14

I submitted a QC report for a related issue over a year ago, but that was for menus. I've never seen this for TToolbar since it is a wrapper to the common control and the drawing is handled by Windows.

However, the images you are seeing are clearly as result of the VCL calling TImageList.Draw and passing Enabled=False – nothing else looks that bad! Are you 100% sure this really is a TToolbar?

The fix will surely be to avoid TImageList.Draw and call ImageList_DrawIndirect with the ILS_SATURATE.

You may need to modify some VCL source. First find the location where the toolbar is being custom drawn and call this routine instead of the calls to TImageList.Draw.

procedure DrawDisabledImage(DC: HDC; ImageList: TCustomImageList; Index, X, Y: Integer);
var
  Options: TImageListDrawParams;
begin
  ZeroMemory(@Options, SizeOf(Options));
  Options.cbSize := SizeOf(Options);
  Options.himl := ImageList.Handle;
  Options.i := Index;
  Options.hdcDst := DC;
  Options.x := X;
  Options.y := Y;
  Options.fState := ILS_SATURATE;
  ImageList_DrawIndirect(@Options);
end;

An even better fix would be to work out why the toolbar is being custom drawn and find a way to let the system do it.


EDIT 1

I've looked at the Delphi source code and I'd guess that you are custom drawing the toolbar, perhaps because it has a gradient. I never even knew that TToolbar could handle custom drawing but I'm just a plain vanilla kind of guy!

Anyway, I can see code in TToolBar.GradientDrawButton calling the TImageList.Draw so I think the explanation above is on the right track.

I'm fairly sure that calling my DrawDisabledImage function above will give you better results. If could find a way to make that happen when you call TImageList.Draw then that would, I suppose, be the very best fix since it would apply wholesale.

EDIT 2

Combine the function above with @RRUZ's answer and you have an excellent solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. Do you know why the VCL doesn't rely on the Windows API in every instance? –  Andreas Rejbrand May 14 '11 at 17:13
1  
I would really, really enjoy your answer if you added screenshots showing the native Windows style and the VCL style next to each other so one can compare them and see the difference. –  Andreas Rejbrand May 14 '11 at 17:16
    
yes I had it set to Gradient style, I only have it like this because it paints a office style color over the buttons when you hover over them. I have yet to look at your answer properly yet, but when I get some more time I will check it out thanks. –  user741875 May 14 '11 at 17:29

Solution from @RRUZ dosn't work if you use LargeImages in ActionToolBar. I made changes to the @RRUZ code to work with LargeImages in ActionToolBar.

unit unCustomImageDrawHook;

interface

uses
  Windows,
  SysUtils,
  Graphics,
  ImgList,
  CommCtrl,
  Math,
  Vcl.ActnMan,
  System.Classes;

implementation

type
  TJumpOfs = Integer;
  PPointer = ^Pointer;

  PXRedirCode = ^TXRedirCode;
  TXRedirCode = packed record
    Jump: Byte;
    Offset: TJumpOfs;
  end;

  PAbsoluteIndirectJmp = ^TAbsoluteIndirectJmp;
  TAbsoluteIndirectJmp = packed record
    OpCode: Word;
    Addr: PPointer;
  end;


  TCustomImageListHack = class(TCustomImageList);
  TCustomActionControlHook = class(TCustomActionControl);

var
  DoDrawBackup   : TXRedirCode;
  DoDrawBackup2   : TXRedirCode;  

function GetActualAddr(Proc: Pointer): Pointer;
begin
  if Proc <> nil then
  begin
    if (Win32Platform = VER_PLATFORM_WIN32_NT) and (PAbsoluteIndirectJmp(Proc).OpCode = $25FF) then
      Result := PAbsoluteIndirectJmp(Proc).Addr^
    else
      Result := Proc;
  end
  else
    Result := nil;
end;

procedure HookProc(Proc, Dest: Pointer; var BackupCode: TXRedirCode);
var
  n: SIZE_T;
  Code: TXRedirCode;
begin
  Proc := GetActualAddr(Proc);
  Assert(Proc <> nil);
  if ReadProcessMemory(GetCurrentProcess, Proc, @BackupCode, SizeOf(BackupCode), n) then
  begin
    Code.Jump := $E9;
    Code.Offset := PAnsiChar(Dest) - PAnsiChar(Proc) - SizeOf(Code);
    WriteProcessMemory(GetCurrentProcess, Proc, @Code, SizeOf(Code), n);
  end;
end;

procedure UnhookProc(Proc: Pointer; var BackupCode: TXRedirCode);
var
  n: SIZE_T;
begin
  if (BackupCode.Jump <> 0) and (Proc <> nil) then
  begin
    Proc := GetActualAddr(Proc);
    Assert(Proc <> nil);
    WriteProcessMemory(GetCurrentProcess, Proc, @BackupCode, SizeOf(BackupCode), n);
    BackupCode.Jump := 0;
  end;
end;

procedure Bitmap2GrayScale(const BitMap: TBitmap);
type
  TRGBArray = array[0..32767] of TRGBTriple;
  PRGBArray = ^TRGBArray;
var
  x, y, Gray: Integer;
  Row       : PRGBArray;
begin
  BitMap.PixelFormat := pf24Bit;
  for y := 0 to BitMap.Height - 1 do
  begin
    Row := BitMap.ScanLine[y];
    for x := 0 to BitMap.Width - 1 do
    begin
      Gray             := (Row[x].rgbtRed + Row[x].rgbtGreen + Row[x].rgbtBlue) div 3;
      Row[x].rgbtRed   := Gray;
      Row[x].rgbtGreen := Gray;
      Row[x].rgbtBlue  := Gray;
    end;
  end;
end;


//from ImgList.GetRGBColor
function GetRGBColor(Value: TColor): DWORD;
begin
  Result := ColorToRGB(Value);
  case Result of
    clNone:
      Result := CLR_NONE;
    clDefault:
      Result := CLR_DEFAULT;
  end;
end;


procedure New_Draw(Self: TObject; Index: Integer; Canvas: TCanvas; X, Y: Integer; Style: Cardinal; Enabled: Boolean);
var
  MaskBitMap : TBitmap;
  GrayBitMap : TBitmap;
begin
  with TCustomImageListHack(Self) do
  begin
    if not HandleAllocated then Exit;
    if Enabled then
      ImageList_DrawEx(Handle, Index, Canvas.Handle, X, Y, 0, 0, GetRGBColor(BkColor), GetRGBColor(BlendColor), Style)
    else
    begin
      GrayBitMap := TBitmap.Create;
      MaskBitMap := TBitmap.Create;
      try
        GrayBitMap.SetSize(Width, Height);
        MaskBitMap.SetSize(Width, Height);
        GetImages(Index, GrayBitMap, MaskBitMap);
        Bitmap2GrayScale(GrayBitMap);
        BitBlt(Canvas.Handle, X, Y, Width, Height, MaskBitMap.Canvas.Handle, 0, 0, SRCERASE);
        BitBlt(Canvas.Handle, X, Y, Width, Height, GrayBitMap.Canvas.Handle, 0, 0, SRCINVERT);
      finally
        GrayBitMap.Free;
        MaskBitMap.Free;
      end;
    end;
  end;
end;


procedure New_Draw2(Self: TObject; const Location: TPoint);
var
  ImageList: TCustomImageList;
  DrawEnabled: Boolean;
  LDisabled: Boolean;
begin
  with TCustomActionControlHook(Self) do
  begin
    if not HasGlyph then Exit;
    ImageList := FindImageList(True, LDisabled, ActionClient.ImageIndex);
    if not Assigned(ImageList) then Exit;
    DrawEnabled := LDisabled or Enabled and (ActionClient.ImageIndex <> -1) or
      (csDesigning in ComponentState);
    ImageList.Draw(Canvas, Location.X, Location.Y, ActionClient.ImageIndex,
      dsTransparent, itImage, DrawEnabled);
  end;
end;


procedure HookDraw;
begin
  HookProc(@TCustomImageListHack.DoDraw, @New_Draw, DoDrawBackup);
  HookProc(@TCustomActionControlHook.DrawLargeGlyph, @New_Draw2, DoDrawBackup2);
end;

procedure UnHookDraw;
begin
  UnhookProc(@TCustomImageListHack.DoDraw, DoDrawBackup);
  UnhookProc(@TCustomActionControlHook.DrawLargeGlyph, DoDrawBackup2);
end;


initialization
  HookDraw;
finalization
  UnHookDraw;
end.
share|improve this answer

Take a look at this Delphi IDE fix. Maybe you can mimic it's implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
nice tool , now my IDE looks nice –  VibeeshanRC May 14 '11 at 16:25
3  
This is a great example of how one should not attempt to alter the default appearance of a Windows GUI. –  Andreas Rejbrand May 14 '11 at 16:45
4  
It's not default appearance of Windows GUI. I've never seen such ugly painted icons anywhere on Windows except Delphi applications. –  Linas May 14 '11 at 17:13
    
You are probably right. I didn't know that the VCL did its own drawing. Still, my concerns regarding the new appearance due to the 'fix' above remains. –  Andreas Rejbrand May 14 '11 at 17:15
    
@Andreas That fix isn't mine and I agree that Delphi disabled icons are more noticeable but I also think that they are ugly. –  Linas May 14 '11 at 17:22

Use TActionToolbar , TActionmanager , Timagelist

Set action managers image list to a Timagelist. and set Disabledimages to another imagelist

share|improve this answer
2  
The OP already knows about this. –  Andreas Rejbrand May 14 '11 at 16:18

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