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After the changes that was made in jQuery 1.6/.1, I have been trying to define the difference between properties and attributes in HTML.

Looking at the list on the jQuery 1.6.1 release notes (near the bottom), http://blog.jquery.com/2011/05/12/jquery-1-6-1-released/, it seems one can classify HTML properties and attributes as follows:

Properties: All which either has a boolean value or that is UA calculated such as selectedIndex

Attributes: 'Attributes' that can be added to a HTML element which is neither boolean nor containing a UA generated value.

Thoughts?

Schalk

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3 Answers 3

up vote 133 down vote accepted

When writing HTML source code, you can define attributes on your HTML elements. Then, once the browser parses your code, a corresponding DOM node will be created. This node is an object, and therefore it has properties.

For instance, this HTML element:

<input type="text" value="Name:">

has 2 attributes.

Once the browser parses this code, a HTMLInputElement object will be created, and this object will contain dozens of properties like: accept, accessKey, align, alt, attributes, autofocus, baseURI, checked, childElementCount, childNodes, children, classList, className, clientHeight, etc.

For a given DOM node object, properties are the properties of that object, and attributes are the elements of the attributes property of that object.


Update: When a DOM node is created for a given HTML element, a corresponding property is created for each attribute in the HTML source code. For instance, for this HTML element:

<input type="text" value="Name:">

the corresponding DOM node will have a type and a value property (among others). However, when the user manually changes the value of the input box, the value property will reflect this change. So if the user inputs "John" into the input box, then:

input.value // returns "John"

whereas:

input.getAttribute('value') // returns "Name:"

The value property reflects the current text-content inside the input box, whereas the value attribute contains the initial text-content of the value attribute from the HTML source code.

So if you want to know what's currently inside the text-box, read the property. If you, however, want to know what the initial value of the text-box was, read the attribute.

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Thanks for the answer Sime, please see my comment above. –  schalkneethling May 15 '11 at 14:08
    
@ossreleasefeed I've updated my answer. I hope it's a little bit clearer to you now :) –  Šime Vidas May 15 '11 at 15:12
    
Hey Sime, I am guessing this is pretty ambiguous, especially if you have a look over here: w3.org/TR/html4/index/attributes.html, and there is no clear cut answer. One basically needs to follow what is stated in the summary on the jQuery blog and even then, the one will map to the other and work in both instances with a slight performance hit should you incorrectly use prop when you need to use attr –  schalkneethling May 15 '11 at 17:44
1  
@oss Your link refers to a list of HTML attributes. That list is not ambiguous - those are attributes. –  Šime Vidas May 15 '11 at 19:22

The answers already explain how attributes and properties are handled differently, but I really would like to point out how totally insane this is. Even if it is to some extent the spec.

It is crazy, to have some of the attributes (e.g. id, class, foo, bar) to retain only one kind of value in the DOM, while some attributes (e.g. checked, selected) to retain two values; that is, the value "when it was loaded" and the value of the "dynamic state". (Isn't the DOM supposed to be to represent the state of the document to its full extent?)

It is absolutely essential, that two input fields, e.g. a text and a checkbox behave the very same way. If the text input field does not retain a separate "when it was loaded" value and the "current, dynamic" value, why does the checkbox? If the checkbox does have two values for the checked attribute, why does it not have two for its class and id attributes? If you expect to change the value of a text *input* field, and you expect the DOM (i.e. the "serialized representation") to change, and reflect this change, why on earth would you not expect the same from an input field of type checkbox on the checked attribute?

The differentiation, of "it is a boolean attribute" just does not make any sense to me, or is, at least not a sufficient reason for this.

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4  
This is not an answer but I'm agree with you; it's totally insane. –  Samuel May 14 '13 at 13:22
    
Yes this concept sucks and should not been standardised so badly. This was one of the cases (like innerHTML for example) that was good in old IE and should have been adopted by the standards. Properties and attributes were synchronised wherever possible, even custom attributes, making very nice readable js dot syntax. HTML5 makes custom HTML tags first class citizens, custom attributes should also be. This feature being removed since old IE is still a real issue - we are only just now seeing a lot of corporates traditionally stuck with IE for old systems now finding them broken in IE10. –  mike nelson Aug 7 '13 at 7:02
6  
It's not insane. You've misunderstood. The checked attribute is represented by the defaultChecked property (likewise for a text input the value attribute is represented by the defaultValue property). A second property, checked, is required to represent whether the checkbox is checked because this is an intrinsic part of a checkbox's functionality: it is interactive and can be changed (and reset to the default, if a form reset button is present) by the user, in a way that another attribute such as id is not. It's nothing to do with the fact that it's a boolean attribute. –  Tim Down Oct 23 '13 at 10:03
    
@TimDown -- Thanks. That actually got me over the WTF? hump. –  pedz Jul 8 at 2:23

well these are specified by the w3c what is an attribute and what is a property http://www.w3.org/TR/SVGTiny12/attributeTable.html

but currently attr and prop are not so different and there are almost the same

but they prefer prop for some things

Summary of Preferred Usage

The .prop() method should be used for boolean attributes/properties and for properties which do not exist in html (such as window.location). All other attributes (ones you can see in the html) can and should continue to be manipulated with the .attr() method.

well actually you dont have to change something if you use attr or prop or both, both work but i saw in my own application that prop worked where atrr didnt so i took in my 1.6 app prop =)

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Hey Daniel, I did read that. Just seems there is know clear cut definition to separate the two, as some of what Sime mentions below can also be added to the HTML element, for example alt. Will continue to read some of the HTML spec and see if there is indeed a way to clearly distinguish the two in practice. –  schalkneethling May 15 '11 at 14:08

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