Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

How can I check for null values in JavaScript? I wrote the code below but it didn't work.

if (pass == null || cpass == null || email == null || cemail == null || user == null) {      

    alert("fill all columns");
    return false;  

}   

And how can I find errors in my JavaScript programs?

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure the values you are testing are actually null and not just empty string? – Jan-Peter Vos May 14 '11 at 18:18
32  
testing null in js should be done with the strict operator === – davin May 14 '11 at 18:19
    
@Hogan, I meant strict, and I assume by the upvotes that the readers interpreted it that way... – davin May 14 '11 at 18:22
1  
@davin - true, but not the problem here since if it were the statement would still work. – zyklus May 14 '11 at 18:22
2  
@cwolves, if I thought it were the problem I would have made that comment an answer. Check out my wording, I'm clearly making a general statement about the language in reference to the OP's practise, and not proposing that this solves his problem. – davin May 14 '11 at 18:24

13 Answers 13

up vote 375 down vote accepted

Javascript is very flexible with regards to checking for "null" values. I'm guessing you're actually looking for empty strings, in which case this simpler code will work:

if(!pass || !cpass || !email || !cemail || !user){

Which will check for empty strings (""), null, undefined, false and the numbers 0 and NaN

Please note that if you are specifically checking for numbers it is a common mistake to miss 0 with this method, and num !== 0 is preferred (or num !== -1 or ~num (hacky code that also checks against -1)) for functions that return -1, e.g. indexOf)

share|improve this answer
3  
It would be very useful to know which parts of this test for which values. Sometimes you're looking for one in particular. – inorganik Apr 19 '13 at 19:28
2  
Somewhat of a late statement, but yes, you can perform test against each one @inorganik , see my answer below – WebWanderer Dec 18 '14 at 16:02
3  
Readers, please be careful when using this type of test on numeric data. Do not use ! or !! to test for null or undefined on typically-numeric data unless you also want to throw away values of 0. – NickS Feb 24 at 21:06
1  
Have to agree with NickS. If you're specifically testing for null, it's possible to get false positives with this type of boolean NOT test. This is an overbroad solution to a specific question. – YiddishNinja Jun 24 at 19:35
1  
This is not actually answering the question. It's based on a guess: "I'm guessing you're actually looking for empty strings." The question concerns checking for null values. @WebWanderer has the correct solution. – Hendeca Jul 2 at 0:31

To check for null SPECIFICALLY you would use this:

if(variable === null && typeof variable === "object")

...or more simply:

if(variable === null)

This test will ONLY pass for null and will not pass for "", undefined, false, 0, or NaN.

The rest of this is in response to inorganik's comment, Yes, you can check each one individually.

You need to implement use of the absolutely equals: === and typeof to be absolutely sure with your checks.

I've created a JSFiddle here to show all of the individual tests working

Here is all of the output of the tests:

Null Test:

if(variable === null && typeof variable === "object")

- variable = ""; (false) typeof variable = string

- variable = null; (true) typeof variable = object

- variable = undefined; (false) typeof variable = undefined

- variable = false; (false) typeof variable = boolean

- variable = 0; (false) typeof variable = number

- variable = NaN; (false) typeof variable = number



Empty String Test:

if(variable === "" && typeof variable === "string")

- variable = ""; (true) typeof variable = string

- variable = null; (false) typeof variable = object

- variable = undefined; (false) typeof variable = undefined

- variable = false; (false) typeof variable = boolean

- variable = 0; (false) typeof variable = number

- variable = NaN; (false) typeof variable = number




Undefined Test:

if(variable === undefined && typeof variable === "undefined")

- variable = ""; (false) typeof variable = string

- variable = null; (false) typeof variable = object

- variable = undefined; (true) typeof variable = undefined

- variable = false; (false) typeof variable = boolean

- variable = 0; (false) typeof variable = number

- variable = NaN; (false) typeof variable = number



False Test:

if(variable === false && typeof variable === "boolean")

- variable = ""; (false) typeof variable = string

- variable = null; (false) typeof variable = object

- variable = undefined; (false) typeof variable = undefined

- variable = false; (true) typeof variable = boolean

- variable = 0; (false) typeof variable = number

- variable = NaN; (false) typeof variable = number



Zero Test:

if(variable === 0 && typeof variable === "number")

- variable = ""; (false) typeof variable = string

- variable = null; (false) typeof variable = object

- variable = undefined; (false) typeof variable = undefined

- variable = false; (false) typeof variable = boolean

- variable = 0; (true) typeof variable = number

- variable = NaN; (false) typeof variable = number



NaN Test:

if(!parseFloat(variable) && variable != 0 && typeof variable === "number")

- variable = ""; (false) typeof variable = string

- variable = null; (false) typeof variable = object

- variable = undefined; (false) typeof variable = undefined

- variable = false; (false) typeof variable = boolean

- variable = 0; (false) typeof variable = number

- variable = NaN; (true) typeof variable = number

As you can see, its a little more difficult to test against NaN;

share|improve this answer
2  
What is the purpose of type checking if you use === strict equality? Thanks. Also for NaN test you can use isNaN(value) that will return true only if variable equals NaN. – Michael Malinovskij Feb 11 '15 at 13:20
2  
Sanity check, plus, you'd be surprised how many times I've used an absolutely equals and not received a proper value in return with checking typeof. lol. Also, I've had some issues with isNaN in the past, so I decided to provide what is an absolutely sure-fire way to check each one. There should be no case failure on any of these checks. You're welcome. – WebWanderer Feb 11 '15 at 18:10
8  
Is there a case where variable === null but is not of type "object"? If there is not, why not simplify the check to variable === null, throwing out the second conjunct? Thanks. – Hunan Rostomyan Apr 4 '15 at 22:19
6  
@HunanRostomyan Good question, and honestly, no, I do not think that there is. You are most likely safe enough using variable === null which I just tested here in this JSFiddle. The reason I also used ` && typeof variable === 'object'` was not only to illustrate the interesting fact that a null value is a typeof object, but also to keep with the flow of the other checks. But yes, in conclusion, you are safe to use simply variable === null. – WebWanderer Apr 6 '15 at 14:59
1  
@WebWanderer Thank you for your thoughtful response. Makes sense. – Hunan Rostomyan Apr 6 '15 at 18:27

just replace the == with === in all places.

== is a loose or abstract equality comparison

=== is a strict equality comparison

See the MDN article on Equality comparisons and sameness for more detail.

share|improve this answer
10  
I can't stand "Just do this..." answers without explanation to why someone should do something. – John Jan 5 at 17:40
    
This only works if you consider undefined to be not null. Otherwise it will lead to a lot of unexpected behavior. Generally if you're interested in both null/undefined but not falsy values, then use == (one of the few cases when you should do so). – Andrew Mao May 11 at 22:40
    
@AndrewMao undefined is not null: stackoverflow.com/a/5076962/753237 – ic3b3rg Jun 27 at 2:18
1  
I believe that's what @AndrewMao was saying, really. His first sentence might be rewritten "This only works in situations where undefined and null are not practical equivalents." – BobRodes Jun 30 at 2:22
    
@BobRodes Thanks for clarifying my poor writing, I appreciate it :) – Andrew Mao Jun 30 at 15:16

Firstly, you have a return statement without a function body. Chances are that that will throw an error.

A cleaner way to do your check would be to simply use the ! operator:

if (!pass || !cpass || !email || !cemail || !user) {

    alert("fill all columns");

}
share|improve this answer
11  
That code is probably in a function, he just didn't show it ;) – zyklus May 14 '11 at 18:22

to check for undefined and null in javascript you need just to write the following :

if (!var) {
        console.log("var IS null or undefined");
} else {
        console.log("var is NOT null or undefined");
}
share|improve this answer
2  
!var is true with 0, "", NaN, and false, too. – Matt Aug 13 '15 at 16:10

you can use try catch finally

 try {
     document.getElementById("mydiv").innerHTML = 'Success' //assuming "mydiv" is undefined
 } catch (e) {

     if (e.name.toString() == "TypeError") //evals to true in this case
     //do something

 } finally {}   

you can also throw your own errors. See this.

share|improve this answer
1  
i think this qualifies as 'paranoid' code. if you really wrote something like this, it would be with an understanding that "mydiv" couldn't possibly not exist. we shouldn't reach this code unless we're confident that's the case, and we'd have plenty of avenues such as response codes to make sure we're confident before attempting such a line. – calql8edkos May 5 '15 at 16:09

This is a comment on WebWanderer's solution regarding checking for NaN (I don't have enough rep yet to leave a formal comment). The solution reads as

if(!parseInt(variable) && variable != 0 && typeof variable === "number")

but this will fail for rational numbers which would round to 0, such as variable = 0.1. A better test would be:

if(isNaN(variable) && typeof variable === "number")
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for pointing out the bug Gabriel, I've put the fix into my answer. Aside from that, I was able to fix the test by changing parseInt to parseFloat (which should have been obvious to me in the first place). I avoided using the isNan function because I feel as if many developers view functions such as isNaN as some sort of "magic box" that values go into and booleans come out of, and I wanted to should the test a little more in depth. But yes, your suggested test will work and is perfectly fine to use. Sorry I didn't notice your post until now. – WebWanderer Apr 16 '15 at 15:06
1  
Great, that seems to work. Thanks for the comment on why you avoided isNaN as well, I can get behind that logic. There's also the Underscore.js method, which seems even more confusing/blackbox, but worth noting anyway because it takes advantage of NaN !== NaN. Object.prototype.toString.call(variable) === '[object Number]' && variable !== +variable – Gabriel Apr 18 '15 at 0:23
    
Ooh! That's actually pretty cool! Thanks for the info Gabe! – WebWanderer Apr 20 '15 at 14:33

In JavaScript, no string is equal to null.

Maybe you expected pass == null to be true when pass is an empty string because you're aware that the loose equality operator == performs certain kinds of type coercion.

For example, this expression is true:

'' == 0

In contrast, the strict equality operator === says that this is false:

'' === 0

Given that '' and 0 are loosely equal, you might reasonably conjecture that '' and null are loosely equal. However, they are not.

This expression is false:

'' == null

The result of comparing any string to null is false. Therefore, pass == null and all your other tests are always false, and the user never gets the alert.

To fix your code, compare each value to the empty string:

pass === ''

If you're certain that pass is a string, pass == '' will also work because only an empty string is loosely equal to the empty string. On the other hand, some experts say that it's a good practice to always use strict equality in JavaScript unless you specifically want to do the type coercion that the loose equality operator performs.

If you want to know what pairs of values are loosely equal, see the table "Sameness comparisons" in the Mozilla article on this topic.

share|improve this answer

underscore: _.isNull

_.isNull(null);
=> true
_.isNull(undefined);
=> false

jQuery: jQuery.type

jQuery.type( null ) === "null"
share|improve this answer
2  
Really, implementing an entire 3rd party library to do type checking? There's a common statement I make to people who begin to try using Underscore.js and/or JQuery as their answer for everything (which is a bad idea), and that is "..using JQuery in a small, simple project is like installing a rocket ship in your kitchen, just so you can use it's thrusters to make a piece of toast." Always keep in mind, unless your project uses EVERYTHING that a 3rd party library has to offer, don't use it, you don't need it, and you don't need to load the many thousand lines of extra code for nothing – WebWanderer Feb 16 '15 at 20:52

Tension Free Solution

use jquery to check if object is Empty. then you can Negate it by Just adding !

$.isEmptyObject(data[i].geo)

if (!($.isEmptyObject(data[i].geo))) {

    var computed_latitude = data[i].geo.coordinates[0];
    var computed_longitude = data[i].geo.coordinates[1];
    myLatlng = {lat: computed_latitude, lng: computed_longitude};
    var marker = new google.maps.Marker({
        position: myLatlng,
        map: map,
        title: data[i].text
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
What? This answer has nothing to do with this post. Did you post this answer on this thread by accident? – WebWanderer Nov 2 '15 at 20:32

This will not work in case of Boolean values coming from DB for ex:

 value = false

 if(!value) {
   // it will change all false values to not available
   return "not available"
 }
share|improve this answer

We can check null by ===

if(value === null){

}

Just by using if

if( value ) {

}

will evaluate to true if value is not: - null - undefined - NaN - empty string ("") - false

share|improve this answer

Try this:

if (!variable && typeof variable === "object") {
    // variable is null
}
share|improve this answer
    
null is only thing that is "falsy" and typeof returns "object". – user5520516 Nov 3 '15 at 14:25
    
How is that better than if (variable === null)? Also someone already provided that answer last year: stackoverflow.com/a/27550756/218196 . – Felix Kling Nov 3 '15 at 14:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.