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How can I check for null values in javascript? I wrote the code below but it didn’t work.

if (pass == null || cpass == null || email == null || cemail == null || user == null) {      

    alert("fill all columns");
    return false;  

}   

And how can I find errors in my javascript programs?

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Are you sure the values you are testing are actually null and not just empty string? –  Jan-Peter Vos May 14 '11 at 18:18
18  
testing null in js should be done with the strict operator === –  davin May 14 '11 at 18:19
    
@Hogan, I meant strict, and I assume by the upvotes that the readers interpreted it that way... –  davin May 14 '11 at 18:22
1  
@davin - true, but not the problem here since if it were the statement would still work. –  zyklus May 14 '11 at 18:22
2  
@cwolves, if I thought it were the problem I would have made that comment an answer. Check out my wording, I'm clearly making a general statement about the language in reference to the OP's practise, and not proposing that this solves his problem. –  davin May 14 '11 at 18:24

8 Answers 8

up vote 212 down vote accepted

Javascript is very flexible with regards to checking for "null" values. I'm guessing you're actually looking for empty strings, in which case this simpler code will work:

if(!pass || !cpass || !email || !cemail || !user){

Which will check for empty strings (""), null, undefined, false and the numbers 0 and NaN

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It would be very useful to know which parts of this test for which values. Sometimes you're looking for one in particular. –  inorganik Apr 19 '13 at 19:28
1  
Somewhat of a late statement, but yes, you can perform test against each one @inorganik , see my answer below –  WebWanderer Dec 18 '14 at 16:02

just replace the == with === in all places.

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To check for null SPECIFICALLY you would use this:

if(variable === null && typeof variable === "object")

This test will ONLY pass for null and will not pass for "", undefined, false, 0, or NaN.

The rest of this is in response to inorganik's comment, Yes, you can check each one individually.

You need to implement use of the absolutely equals: === and typeof to be absolutely sure with your checks.

I've created a JSFiddle here to show all of the individual tests working

Here is all of the output of the tests:

Null Test:

if(variable === null && typeof variable === "object")

- variable = ""; (false) typeof variable = string

- variable = null; (true) typeof variable = object

- variable = undefined; (false) typeof variable = undefined

- variable = false; (false) typeof variable = boolean

- variable = 0; (false) typeof variable = number

- variable = NaN; (false) typeof variable = number



Empty String Test:

if(variable === "" && typeof variable === "string")

- variable = ""; (true) typeof variable = string

- variable = null; (false) typeof variable = object

- variable = undefined; (false) typeof variable = undefined

- variable = false; (false) typeof variable = boolean

- variable = 0; (false) typeof variable = number

- variable = NaN; (false) typeof variable = number




Undefined Test:

if(variable === undefined && typeof variable === "undefined")

- variable = ""; (false) typeof variable = string

- variable = null; (false) typeof variable = object

- variable = undefined; (true) typeof variable = undefined

- variable = false; (false) typeof variable = boolean

- variable = 0; (false) typeof variable = number

- variable = NaN; (false) typeof variable = number



False Test:

if(variable === false && typeof variable === "boolean")

- variable = ""; (false) typeof variable = string

- variable = null; (false) typeof variable = object

- variable = undefined; (false) typeof variable = undefined

- variable = false; (true) typeof variable = boolean

- variable = 0; (false) typeof variable = number

- variable = NaN; (false) typeof variable = number



Zero Test:

if(variable === 0 && typeof variable === "number")

- variable = ""; (false) typeof variable = string

- variable = null; (false) typeof variable = object

- variable = undefined; (false) typeof variable = undefined

- variable = false; (false) typeof variable = boolean

- variable = 0; (true) typeof variable = number

- variable = NaN; (false) typeof variable = number



NaN Test:

if(!parseFloat(variable) && variable != 0 && typeof variable === "number")

- variable = ""; (false) typeof variable = string

- variable = null; (false) typeof variable = object

- variable = undefined; (false) typeof variable = undefined

- variable = false; (false) typeof variable = boolean

- variable = 0; (false) typeof variable = number

- variable = NaN; (true) typeof variable = number

As you can see, its a little more difficult to test against NaN;

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What is the purpose of type checking if you use === strict equality? Thanks. Also for NaN test you can use isNaN(value) that will return true only if variable equals NaN. –  Michael Malinovskij Feb 11 at 13:20
1  
Sanity check, plus, you'd be surprised how many times I've used an absolutely equals and not received a proper value in return with checking typeof. lol. Also, I've had some issues with isNaN in the past, so I decided to provide what is an absolutely sure-fire way to check each one. There should be no case failure on any of these checks. You're welcome. –  WebWanderer Feb 11 at 18:10
    
Is there a case where variable === null but is not of type "object"? If there is not, why not simplify the check to variable === null, throwing out the second conjunct? Thanks. –  Hunan Rostomyan Apr 4 at 22:19
    
@HunanRostomyan Good question, and honestly, no, I do not think that there is. You are most likely safe enough using variable === null which I just tested here in this JSFiddle. The reason I also used ` && typeof variable === 'object'` was not only to illustrate the interesting fact that a null value is a typeof object, but also to keep with the flow of the other checks. But yes, in conclusion, you are safe to use simply variable === null. –  WebWanderer Apr 6 at 14:59
    
@WebWanderer Thank you for your thoughtful response. Makes sense. –  Hunan Rostomyan Apr 6 at 18:27

you can use try catch finally

 try {
     document.getElementById("mydiv").innerHTML = 'Success' //assuming "mydiv" is undefined
 } catch (e) {

     if (e.name.toString() == "TypeError") //evals to true in this case
     //do something

 } finally {}   

you can also throw your own errors. See this.

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i think this qualifies as 'paranoid' code. if you really wrote something like this, it would be with an understanding that "mydiv" couldn't possibly not exist. we shouldn't reach this code unless we're confident that's the case, and we'd have plenty of avenues such as response codes to make sure we're confident before attempting such a line. –  calql8edkos 21 hours ago

Firstly, you have a return statement without a function body. Chances are that that will throw an error.

A cleaner way to do your check would be to simply use the ! operator:

if (!pass || !cpass || !email || !cemail || !user) {

    alert("fill all columns");

}
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9  
That code is probably in a function, he just didn't show it ;) –  zyklus May 14 '11 at 18:22

This is a comment on WebWanderer's solution regarding checking for NaN (I don't have enough rep yet to leave a formal comment). The solution reads as

if(!parseInt(variable) && variable != 0 && typeof variable === "number")

but this will fail for rational numbers which would round to 0, such as variable = 0.1. A better test would be:

if(isNaN(variable) && typeof variable === "number")
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1  
Thanks for pointing out the bug Gabriel, I've put the fix into my answer. Aside from that, I was able to fix the test by changing parseInt to parseFloat (which should have been obvious to me in the first place). I avoided using the isNan function because I feel as if many developers view functions such as isNaN as some sort of "magic box" that values go into and booleans come out of, and I wanted to should the test a little more in depth. But yes, your suggested test will work and is perfectly fine to use. Sorry I didn't notice your post until now. –  WebWanderer Apr 16 at 15:06
1  
Great, that seems to work. Thanks for the comment on why you avoided isNaN as well, I can get behind that logic. There's also the Underscore.js method, which seems even more confusing/blackbox, but worth noting anyway because it takes advantage of NaN !== NaN. Object.prototype.toString.call(variable) === '[object Number]' && variable !== +variable –  Gabriel Apr 18 at 0:23
    
Ooh! That's actually pretty cool! Thanks for the info Gabe! –  WebWanderer Apr 20 at 14:33

underscore: _.isNull

_.isNull(null);
=> true
_.isNull(undefined);
=> false

jQuery: jQuery.type

jQuery.type( null ) === "null"
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1  
Really, implementing an entire 3rd party library to do type checking? There's a common statement I make to people who begin to try using Underscore.js and/or JQuery as their answer for everything (which is a bad idea), and that is "..using JQuery in a small, simple project is like installing a rocket ship in your kitchen, just so you can use it's thrusters to make a piece of toast." Always keep in mind, unless your project uses EVERYTHING that a 3rd party library has to offer, don't use it, you don't need it, and you don't need to load the many thousand lines of extra code for nothing –  WebWanderer Feb 16 at 20:52

to check for undifined and null in javascript you need just to whrite the folowing :

if (!var) {
        console.log("var IS null or undefined");
} else {
        console.log("var is NOT null or undefined");
}
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