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I have a string "Fri, 31 Dec 1999 23:59:59 GMT" which comes from retry-after.
I want to compare this with today's datetime.
I don't understand how to work with GMT.
Can anyone help me out?

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1 Answer 1

Using dateutil and pytz:

import datetime as dt
import dateutil.parser as parser
import pytz

date_string="Fri, 31 Dec 1999 23:59:59 GMT"    
then=parser.parse(date_string)

eastern=pytz.timezone('US/Eastern')
now=eastern.localize(dt.datetime.now())

print(repr(then))
# datetime.datetime(1999, 12, 31, 23, 59, 59, tzinfo=tzutc())

print(repr(now))
# datetime.datetime(2011, 5, 14, 15, 51, 48, 438283, tzinfo=<DstTzInfo 'US/Eastern' EDT-1 day, 20:00:00 DST>)

print(then-now)
# -4152 days, 4:08:10.561717

Dealing with timezones can be tricky. The easiest and most reliable way to handle arbitrary timezone conversions is to use pytz.

If you know for certain that date_string will be in the GMT timezone, then there is a way to convert between GMT and local time without the pytz module. However, beware: Although the conversion gives the correct (naive) local datetime, the difference of two naive datetimes can be off by an hour due to lack of accounting for Daylight Savings Time:

import datetime as dt
import calendar

date_string="Fri, 31 Dec 1999 23:59:59 GMT"
then=dt.datetime.strptime(date_string, "%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S %Z")
# convert to localtime, assuming date_string is in GMT:
then=dt.datetime.fromtimestamp(calendar.timegm(then.timetuple()))
now=dt.datetime.now()

print(repr(then))
# datetime.datetime(1999, 12, 31, 18, 59, 59)

print(repr(now))
# datetime.datetime(2011, 5, 14, 15, 50, 7, 38349)

print(then-now)
# -4152 days, 3:09:51.961651
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