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I want to write a generic method to get the element at position x of a String or Int. Now my question is, how can I force Scala to convert T to Int or to call a Int specific method.

Here is the code:

def key[T](elm:T,pos:Int) = elm match{
  case x:Int => {
    def digit(number:Int, pos:Int):Int = {
      if(pos == 0) number % 10
        else digit(number/10, pos-1)
    }
    digit(elm.toInt,(elm.toInt).length-pos-1)
  } 
  case x:String => (elm.toString).charAt(pos)
}

Thanks!

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4 Answers

def key[T](elm:T,pos:Int) = elm match { 
    case x:Int => x.toString.charAt(pos) 
    case s:String => s.charAt(pos) 
}

A solution using views:

implicit def i2s(i:Int):String = i.toString
def key2[T <% String](elm:T,pos:Int) = elm match { 
  case x:Int => x.charAt(pos) 
  case s:String => s.charAt(pos) 
}
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ah cool this is working :) but my question is still there. how can I force scala to think that elm is of Type e.g Int so that I could e.g. call the method elm.length ? –  xyz May 14 '11 at 21:05
    
The second solutions will also work with x.length, instead of x.charAt, in case you want to find the answer recursively. –  pedrofurla May 14 '11 at 21:13
2  
x is elm but viewed as an Int. –  Owen Fraser-Green May 14 '11 at 21:14
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I would say, your problem is, that you have two types on which you like to operate, an Int and a String, and you want to perform a key-method on that input, but you don't specify, what you like to return.

My first idea for the Int would be to return an Int. toString().charAt (n) seems like a form of cheating, but maybe cheating is alright, so let's start cheating:

def cheat (a: Any, n: Int) = a.toString ().charAt (n) 
cheat (2345, 2) 
// res414: Char = 4
cheat ("foobar", 2) 
// res415: Char = o

That was nice and easy, wasn't it? But what, if you like to return an Int for an input of Int, and an String, for an Input of String? Char seems more natural for an input of type String, and a byte would be sufficient to return a digit from 0-9, but we have a simpler type dependency, if we return a T for a T.

I'm not convinced of my solution, but I'm not convinced about the cheating, and the first solutions are only a more complicated way of cheating, aren't they?

class Atti [T] (val fun: (Int => T)) {
  def at (n: Int): T = fun (n) 
}

I defined an atti-class, which, for a type T needs a function, which takes an Int, and returns an T, and if you call at on this class, it will invoke that function.

Now we define a function iGet, to get from an Int the digit at position n, and we use two parameter lists, ...

def iGet (i: Int) (n: Int) : Int = {
  if (n == 0) i % 10
    else iGet (i / 10)(n - 1) }

... to pass the Int, on which to operate, eagerly, to define a partially defined function:

val iAt = new Atti[Int] (iGet (2345) _)
 (0 to 3).map (iAt.at (_))
// res412: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[Int] = Vector(5, 4, 3, 2)

Analog function for a string, and declaration of sAt:

def sGet (s: String) (n: Int) : String = "" + s.charAt (n)

val sAt = new Atti[String] (sGet ("foobar") _) 
 (0 to 3).map (sAt.at (_))
// res413: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[String] = Vector(f, o, o, b)

I guess you see that the String is evaluated left to right, while the Int is evaluated right to left, as in your introduction to the problem.

What I don't like myself is, that sAt with the payload 'foobar' isn't a String anymore, and 2345 is somehow hidden in the iAt-object.

And the function to use for a String needs to be specified for every String - which gives you more flexibility than you asked for, and more work for every instance.

I tried to build a trait and mix it into Int or String, but wasn't successful:

trait Key [T] { def at (n: Int): T }
val s : String with Key[String] = "Foobar" { def at (n: Int) : String = "" + s.charAt (n) }  
<console>:7: error: type mismatch;
 found   : Unit
 required: Int
       val s : String with Key[String] = "Foobar" { def at (n: Int) : String = "" + s.charAt (n) }
                                                                                                 ^
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def key[T](elm:T,pos:Int) = elm match {
  case x:Int => {
    def digit(number:Int, pos:Int):Int = {
      if(pos == 0) number % 10
        else digit(number/10, pos-1)
      }
    digit(x,x.length-pos-1)
  } 
  case x:String => x.charAt(pos)
}
share|improve this answer
    
same problem: value length is not a member of Int digit(x,x.length-pos-1) –  xyz May 14 '11 at 21:00
    
Duh. length is not a method of Int, but you can take the logarithm (base 10) to get that. –  Kim Stebel May 14 '11 at 21:14
    
Int doesn't have a length method. –  Owen Fraser-Green May 14 '11 at 21:15
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how can I force Scala to convert T to Int

You can't. Well, you could with some implicit checking, but that's way harder than what you have to do. Instead of using elm, use x:

def key[T](elm:T,pos:Int) = elm match{
  case x:Int => {
    def digit(number:Int, pos:Int):Int = {
      if(pos == 0) number % 10
        else digit(number/10, pos-1)
    }
    digit(x,x.toString.length-pos-1)
  } 
  case x:String => x.charAt(pos)
}
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