Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I run into this article:

Performance: Compiled vs. Interpreted Regular Expressions, I modified the sample code to compile 1000 Regex and then run each 500 times to take advantage of precompilation, however even in that case interpreted RegExes run 4 times faster!

This means RegexOptions.Compiled option is completely useless, actually even worse, it's slower! Big difference was due to JIT, after solving JIT compiled regex in the the following code still performs a little bit slow and doesn't make sense to me but @Jim in the answers provided a much cleaner version which works as expected.

Can anyone explain why this is the case?

Code, taken & modified from the blog post:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace RegExTester
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            DateTime startTime = DateTime.Now;

            for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
            {
                CheckForMatches("some random text with email address, address@domain200.com" + i.ToString());    
            }


            double msTaken = DateTime.Now.Subtract(startTime).TotalMilliseconds;
            Console.WriteLine("Full Run: " + msTaken);


            startTime = DateTime.Now;

            for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
            {
                CheckForMatches("some random text with email address, address@domain200.com" + i.ToString());
            }


            msTaken = DateTime.Now.Subtract(startTime).TotalMilliseconds;
            Console.WriteLine("Full Run: " + msTaken);

            Console.ReadLine();

        }


        private static List<Regex> _expressions;
        private static object _SyncRoot = new object();

        private static List<Regex> GetExpressions()
        {
            if (_expressions != null)
                return _expressions;

            lock (_SyncRoot)
            {
                if (_expressions == null)
                {
                    DateTime startTime = DateTime.Now;

                    List<Regex> tempExpressions = new List<Regex>();
                    string regExPattern =
                        @"^[a-zA-Z0-9]+[a-zA-Z0-9._%-]*@{0}$";

                    for (int i = 0; i < 2000; i++)
                    {
                        tempExpressions.Add(new Regex(
                            string.Format(regExPattern,
                            Regex.Escape("domain" + i.ToString() + "." +
                            (i % 3 == 0 ? ".com" : ".net"))),
                            RegexOptions.IgnoreCase));//  | RegexOptions.Compiled
                    }

                    _expressions = new List<Regex>(tempExpressions);
                    DateTime endTime = DateTime.Now;
                    double msTaken = endTime.Subtract(startTime).TotalMilliseconds;
                    Console.WriteLine("Init:" + msTaken);
                }
            }

            return _expressions;
        }

        static  List<Regex> expressions = GetExpressions();

        private static void CheckForMatches(string text)
        {

            DateTime startTime = DateTime.Now;


                foreach (Regex e in expressions)
                {
                    bool isMatch = e.IsMatch(text);
                }


            DateTime endTime = DateTime.Now;
            //double msTaken = endTime.Subtract(startTime).TotalMilliseconds;
            //Console.WriteLine("Run: " + msTaken);

        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
5  
StopWatch should be used instead of DateTime for benchmarks. –  Domenic May 14 '11 at 21:25
    
@Domenic Agreed, I used the code from blogpost, shouldn't affect the outcome of this test in a useful manner though –  dr. evil May 14 '11 at 21:31
    
The biggest problem is that the first time a compiled Regex will be executed, it will have to be JIT compiled. The JIT compiling is taking more time than actually looking for matches! If you run CheckForMatches once before you initialize startTime, you will see that the times are much closer. –  Gabe May 14 '11 at 22:18
    
@Gabe Good point Gabe, I updated the code, basically run twice and I take the second execution times. I assume this will solve JIT issue. It's still slower though but much much close this time. –  dr. evil May 14 '11 at 22:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Compiled regular expressions match faster when used as intended. As others have pointed out, the idea is to compile them once and use them many times. The construction and initialization time are amortized out over those many runs.

I created a much simpler test that will show you that compiled regular expressions are unquestionably faster than not compiled.

    const int NumIterations = 1000;
    const string TestString = "some random text with email address, address@domain200.com";
    const string Pattern = "^[a-zA-Z0-9]+[a-zA-Z0-9._%-]*@domain0\\.\\.com$";
    private static Regex NormalRegex = new Regex(Pattern, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
    private static Regex CompiledRegex = new Regex(Pattern, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase | RegexOptions.Compiled);
    private static Regex DummyRegex = new Regex("^.$");

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var DoTest = new Action<string, Regex, int>((s, r, count) =>
            {
                Console.Write("Testing {0} ... ", s);
                Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
                for (int i = 0; i < count; ++i)
                {
                    bool isMatch = r.IsMatch(TestString + i.ToString());
                }
                sw.Stop();
                Console.WriteLine("{0:N0} ms", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
            });

        // Make sure that DoTest is JITed
        DoTest("Dummy", DummyRegex, 1);
        DoTest("Normal first time", NormalRegex, 1);
        DoTest("Normal Regex", NormalRegex, NumIterations);
        DoTest("Compiled first time", CompiledRegex, 1);
        DoTest("Compiled", CompiledRegex, NumIterations);

        Console.WriteLine();
        Console.Write("Done. Press Enter:");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

Setting NumIterations to 500 gives me this:

Testing Dummy ... 0 ms
Testing Normal first time ... 0 ms
Testing Normal Regex ... 1 ms
Testing Compiled first time ... 13 ms
Testing Compiled ... 1 ms

With 5 million iterations, I get:

Testing Dummy ... 0 ms
Testing Normal first time ... 0 ms
Testing Normal Regex ... 17,232 ms
Testing Compiled first time ... 17 ms
Testing Compiled ... 15,299 ms

Here you see that the compiled regular expression is at least 10% faster than the not compiled version.

It's interesting to note that if you remove the RegexOptions.IgnoreCase from your regular expression, the results from 5 million iterations are even more striking:

Testing Dummy ... 0 ms
Testing Normal first time ... 0 ms
Testing Normal Regex ... 12,869 ms
Testing Compiled first time ... 14 ms
Testing Compiled ... 8,332 ms

Here, the compiled regular expression is 35% faster than the not compiled regular expression.

In my opinion, the blog post you reference is simply a flawed test.

share|improve this answer
1  
Good one, thanks, especially IgnoreCase effect is quite interesting as well. –  dr. evil May 14 '11 at 22:41
    
Any particular reason for not making the DoTest an actual named method? –  Dyppl May 14 '11 at 23:25
    
@Dyppl: No. It was just easier to make it an Action. –  Jim Mischel May 15 '11 at 5:46
1  
Also note that the locale that these times are using has a comma for the decimal point. For us yanks, the times are 17.232ms and 15.299ms –  IDisposable Aug 2 '11 at 20:49
2  
@IDisposable: Actually, the comma is the thousands separator. It's 17 seconds and change, and 15 seconds and change. The numbers reported are total time for 5 million iterations, not average time per iteration. –  Jim Mischel Aug 2 '11 at 21:10

http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2005/03/to-compile-or-not-to-compile.html

Compiled helps only if you instantiate it once and re-use it multiple times. If you're creating a compiled regex in the for loop then it obviously will perform worse. Can you show us your sample code?

share|improve this answer
    
Added the code, I already told that I compile once and run 500 times. –  dr. evil May 14 '11 at 21:23
2  
But, your code instantiates (and thus compiles) the regex inside the loop, so you are in fact compiling 500 times. –  Domenic May 14 '11 at 21:25
    
ops! you right one moment let me check again –  dr. evil May 14 '11 at 21:27
1  
Your latest code is compiling the regex 1000 times. –  Domenic May 14 '11 at 21:29
1  
So you are doing a very slow operation 1000 times and hoping that speeds up a fast operation done 500 times? You should compile the regex once, then run the regex probably 10,000 times (at least). –  Domenic May 14 '11 at 21:34

The problem with this benchmark is that compiled Regexes have the overhead of creating a whole new assembly and loading it into the AppDomain.

The scenario where compiled Regex was designed for (I believe -- I didn't design them) is having tens of Regexes executed millions of times, not thousands of Regexes executed thousands of times. If you're not going to execute a Regex in the realm of a million times, you probably won't even make up for the time to JIT compile it.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you are right, somehow I assume the performance benefit can quickly kick in if we use more than 100 times, but doesn't look like the case. –  dr. evil May 14 '11 at 22:51

This is almost certainly an indication that your benchmark code is written incorrectly vs. compiled regex's being slower than interpreted ones. There is a lot of work that went into making compiled regex's performant.

Now that we have the code can look at a few specific things that need updating

  1. This code doesn't account for the JIT costs of the method. It should run the code once to get the JIT costs out of the way and then run it again and measure
  2. Why is lock used at all? It's completely unnecessary
  3. Benchmarks should use StopWatch not DateTime
  4. To get a good comparison between Compiled and not compiled you should test the performance of a single compiled Regex and single non-compiled Regex matching N times. Not N of each matching at most once per regex.
share|improve this answer
    
ADded code, have you read the blog post? or tested it? –  dr. evil May 14 '11 at 21:23
    
@dr. evil I've read the blog post and I still think it's incorrect. There are several issues with are simply not accounted for in the testing (several of which I've mentioned and more I will add shortly). –  JaredPar May 14 '11 at 21:26
    
I updated my code as well, slightly better version of the code from that blog post –  dr. evil May 14 '11 at 21:29
    
All of the things you said is correct but still doesn't change the fact that compiled regexes are slow –  dr. evil May 14 '11 at 21:34
2  
Sorry to get antagonistic, but when you lay out an absolutist answer like that when you clearly don't understand how benchmarking works, it's easy to get a bit annoyed. –  Domenic May 14 '11 at 21:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.