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I am connected to the server via the PHP ftp_ functions.

How can I measure the transfer speed?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is how I brutalized the phihag's code to check non-blocking upload speed. You can't use ftp_size() while non-blocking transfer is ongoing, therefore you need a secondary connection just for that purpose. I'm displaying current speed, average speed, elapsed time and estimated time left.

$primary_connection = ftp_connect($server);
$secondary_connection = ftp_connect($server);

$mode = FTP_BINARY;
$login = ftp_login($primary_connection, $ftp_user_name, $ftp_user_pass);
$login2 = ftp_login($secondary_connection, $ftp_user_name, $ftp_user_pass);

if (!$primary_connection || !$login) { die('Connection attempt failed!'); }
ftp_pasv($primary_connection,TRUE);
ftp_pasv($secondary_connection,TRUE);

$upload_status=ftp_nb_put($primary_connection, $destination_file, $source_file, $mode);

define('ALPHA', 0.2); // Weight factor of new calculations, between 0 and 1
$filesize=filesize($source_file);
$transferred = 0;
$rate = 0;
$time = microtime(true);

$start_time=$time;

while($upload_status == FTP_MOREDATA){

    $upload_status = ftp_nb_continue($primary_connection);

    $sizeNow=ftp_size($secondary_connection,$destination_file);
    $sizeNowkB=$sizeNow/1024;
    $timeNow = microtime(true);

    $currentRate = ($sizeNow - $transferred) / ($timeNow - $time);
    $currentkBRate = $currentRate / 1024;

    $rate = ALPHA * $currentRate + (1 - ALPHA) * $rate;
    $time = $timeNow;
    $transferred = $sizeNow;

    printf("Uploading file: %s",$source_file);
    echo "<br>\n";

    printf( "To be transferred: %0.2f kB", $filesize/1024);
    echo "<br>\n";

    printf( "Transferred: %0.2f kB", $sizeNowkB);
    echo "<br>\n";

    printf( "Current speed: %0.2f kB/s", $currentkBRate);
    echo "<br>\n";

    printf( "Average speed: %0.2f kB/s", $rate/1024);
    echo "<br>\n";

    $elapsed_time=$timeNow - $start_time;
    printf( "Elapsed time: %0.2f s", $elapsed_time);
    echo "<br>\n";

    if($rate!=0){
        $eta=$filesize/$rate - $elapsed_time;
    }else{
        $eta=0.0;
    }
    if($eta<=0){
        $eta=0.0;
    };
    printf( "Estimated time left: %0.2f s", $eta);
    echo "<br>\n";

}
share|improve this answer

Use the non-blocking ftp functions to download the file and calculate the time and file size differences. Below is a simple demo with exponential smoothing to prevent the speed from jumping too much:

define('ALPHA', 0.2); // Weight factor of new calculations, between 0 and 1
$ftp = ftp_connect(...);
$tmp = ftp_nb_get($ftp, $filename, $filename, FTP_BINARY);
$transferred = 0;
$rate = 0;
$time = microtime(true);
while ($tmp == FTP_MOREDATA) {
   $tmp = ftp_nb_continue($ftp);

   $timeNow = microtime(true);
   $sizeNow = filesize($filename);
   $currentRate = ($sizeNow - $transferred) / ($timeNow - $time);
   $rate = ALPHA * $currentRate + (1 - ALPHA) * $rate;
   $time = $timeNow;
   $transferred = $sizeNow;

   echo "Current transfer speed: $rate B/s\n";
}

If you want same thing for ftp_nb_put() upload, you would have to replace filesize($filename) with ftp_size($ftp2,$filename), where $ftp2 would have to be a second, identical connection, used just to ask for size of remote file, because ftp_size() will not work with your primary connection, while non-blocking transfer is in progress.

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  1. Before transferring, put the current timestamp into a variable.
  2. Determine the size of your file you want to transfer.
  3. Transfer the file with the ftp functions
  4. Get another timestamp and subtract this from the first timestamp.
  5. Divide the filesize with the result, then you have the kb/sec.

Example:

$start = mktime(); // 1
$size = filesize('yourfile.txt') / 1024 ; // 2 <- to get the KB 

... do your transfer... // 3

//after ftp transfer 
$stop = mktime(); // 4
$duration = $stop - $start; 
$speed = $size / $duration; // 5

This basically gives you the speed after the transfer. If you want the speed while transferring, there are other ways of doing it.

share|improve this answer
    
If you divide the filesize by the difference between the second and first timestamp, you'll get the bytes per second, not the kilobytes per second. – icktoofay May 14 '11 at 21:32
    
Very true, but it basically does the job. I'll elaborate with more details. – Bjoern May 14 '11 at 21:41

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