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I want to have a class which has as a member a pointer to a function

here is the function pointer:

typedef double (*Function)(double);

here is a function that fits the function pointer definition:

double f1(double x)
{
    return 0;
}

here is the class definion:

class IntegrFunction
{
public:
    Function* function;
};

and somewhere in the main function i want to do something like this:

IntegrFunction func1;
func1.function = f1;

But, this code does not work.

Is it possible to assign to a class member a function pointer to a global function, declared as above? Or do I have to change something in the function pointer definition?

Thanks,

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In what way does it not work? –  Dennis Zickefoose May 14 '11 at 21:58
    
How does it "not work"? Do you get a compiler error? If so, what is it? –  Billy ONeal May 14 '11 at 21:58
    
The answer might be easier for us to find if you would supply a complete example. You are so close, it would only take just a few more lines to make it complete. Also, can you tell us what you mean by "does not work?" Do you get an error from the compiler? Linker? Do you get a run-time behavior different than what you expect? –  Robᵩ May 14 '11 at 21:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Replace this:

class IntegrFunction
{
public:
    Function* function;
};

with this:

class IntegrFunction
{
public:
    Function function;
};

Your typedef already creates a pointer-to-function. Declaring Function* function creates a pointer-to-pointer-to-function.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 very nice catch. –  Amardeep May 14 '11 at 22:03
    
Thanks, I understood my mistake and my code works now. I should be more careful next time. –  Alina Danila May 14 '11 at 22:08

Just replace

Function* function;

to

Function function;
share|improve this answer

You declare the variable as Function* function, but the Function typedef is already a typedef for a pointer. So the type of the function pointer is just Function (without the *).

share|improve this answer

Replace

typedef double (*Function)(double);

by

typedef double Function(double);

to typedef the function-type. You can then write the * when using it.

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You need to use the address-of operator to obtain a function pointer in Standard C++03.

func1.function = &f1;
share|improve this answer
2  
No you don't. The & is necessary for taking the address of a member function but not for a nonmember function. –  James McNellis May 14 '11 at 21:58

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