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Okay, I know you can have a program keep running while a certain condition is true using the while statement. However, is it incorrect or bad practice to just recall the function in the else condition like below?

def ask():
    me = input("What is your name? ")

    if me == "Tom":
        print("Hi, Tom!")
    else:
        print ("Who are you?")
        ask()

It just seems like an easier, shorthand version of the 'while statement' but I haven't really seen a program executed like this in the Python tutorials.

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3  
They are different. Since Python does not do tail-recursion, re-calling the function will (eventually) explode. However, I think the sample code/book/tutorial is trying to show the concept of recursion -- and this is not a good example case in Python :) There are many cases in which using recursion can greatly simplify a problem, such as with a generic mergesort, quicksort, or binary tree lookup. (But a degenerate quicksort might not be ideal ;-) –  user166390 May 14 '11 at 23:43
    
Thanks. I didn't even know what I was trying to do had a name. But now that I have something to look up (tail recursion), I will definitely try to understand it a little better and, most importantly, avoid it. Thanks :) –  jerry May 14 '11 at 23:53
    
Tail recursion can be an amazing thing when you want it. But you have to know when you want it. –  Jakob Bowyer May 14 '11 at 23:57
1  
Technically, Python does do tail recursion: if it didn't, this function wouldn't work at all. What it doesn't do is tail call optimization. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tail_recursion for more info. –  intuited May 15 '11 at 0:01
    
try putting code at the end of the function to see the difference between the two of them. –  Winston Ewert May 15 '11 at 0:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To be totally honest they both "work" it just depends on your user case. Granted you are more likely to hit recursion depth compared to something going wrong with while they both achieve similar results. Really its more simple and in my opinion slightly more pythonic (in this specific case) to use a while loop. (why make it more complicated?)

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I wouldn't consider it bad practice unless you expect hundreds to thousands of recursive calls, or if memory management is important for your particular application.

As stated in other answers, Python doesn't support tail recursion elimination, which means that a recursive call to the same function doesn't have to add a new stack frame to the stack. This avoids wasting unnecessary memory.

For an interesting read about why Guido, the creator of Python, considers tail recursion elimination to be unpythonic, see: http://neopythonic.blogspot.com/2009/04/tail-recursion-elimination.html

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Shorthand, you say? Compared to:

def ask():
    while input("What is your name? ") != "Tom":
        print ("Who are you?")
    print("Hi, Tom!")
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Thats kind of messy to be honest? How do you return the input later? –  Jakob Bowyer May 14 '11 at 23:53
    
Please use raw_input, though. –  dancek May 14 '11 at 23:54
    
Jakob: well, just demonstrating that it can be concise. Jerry's example used an explicit "Tom", and so does mine; there's no difficulty returning to an explicit input. (Also just point out the natural conclusion of trying to be concise -- the original recursive example is pretty messy too imho) –  bluepnume May 14 '11 at 23:56
    
Not on python 3.x, the code is 3.x code. –  Jakob Bowyer May 14 '11 at 23:56
    
dancek: Clearly he's using python 3, so actually the correct function is input() –  bluepnume May 14 '11 at 23:56

I suggest to use a while statement, because you will feel difficulties when the ask function become to have its upper limit to try to input and return the result value.

To add these functionality, I modify this function such as:

def ask(count):
    if count < 0:
        return False

    me = input("What is your name? ")

    if me == "Tom":
        print("Hi, Tom!")
        return True
    else:
        print ("Who are you?")
        return ask(count - 1)

Is that implementation so complicated and confusing?

If the ask function is implemented using 'while' statement, the modification is more simple. Just change 'while' to 'for' to set the loop with an upper limit and insert 'return' statement.

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