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I want to output two HTML documents, wrapped inside of an HTML document

Is it possible to do something like this with HTML?

<html>
  <head></head>
  <body>
    <frameset>
      <frame>
        <html>
          <head></head>
          <body>First page here</body>
        </html>
      </frame>
      <frame>
        <html>
          <head></head>
          <body>Second page here</body>
        </html>
      </frame>
  </body>
</html>

It doesn't have to be frames, but I only want to hit the server once, so linking to a document with src attribute is out, it has to be inline.

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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not possible. Neither iframe nor frame is inline. The best for your scenario would be to extract the body tag content, and insert it into a div. CSS would be a problem, though - there'd have to be some processing on it so it would be restricted to just half the page. Something like this:

<html>
  <head>
    <title>Combined</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div id="page1">
      First page here
    </div>
    <div id="page1">
      First page here
    </div>
  </body>
</html>

CSS transformation: body -> #page1 (or #page2), #id -> #id, anything else X -> #page1 X.

Using iframes is definitely easier; and if the server is well-configured, it probably doesn't even require a separate connection.

BTW: Your suggestion will probably render, but AFAIK it's non-standard (browsers guessing what you want, instead going by the specification, something browsers have gotten used to having to do); and there's still the problem of CSS.

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"Not possible" Oh well –  Dave May 15 '11 at 0:08
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Unless there is one HTML file - as specified in your question - where the contents of both HTML pages are in one file, you will have to hit the server more than once.

Also the HTTP protocol transfers one object at a time. Unless one of the objects is cached, you will also have to talk to the server twice.

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Incorrect. HTTP protocol transfers one object at a time, unless it knows the length of the transfered document, via Content-Length header (or it is chunked, and each chunk is given the length) - thus "server set up properly" part of my response. However, Apache will record two "hits" in its access log, which would make statistics slightly different, and if this is what the OP is trying to avoid, well, then avoiding src has some merit. –  Amadan May 15 '11 at 0:19
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you could use server side includes but no matter you will be making two server requests if there are two different files.

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It might be overkill, and you don't really talk about where the component pages come from, but you might check out SiteMesh. It's a server-side framework designed to take output pages from other frameworks/apps running on a site, then...

The HTML content is intercepted on its way back to the web-browser where it is parsed. The contents of the <head> tag and the <body> tag are extracted as well as meta-data properties of the page (such as title, <meta> tags and attributes of the <html> and <body> tags).

then outputs a single page. IIRC, LinkedIn uses it to apply a consistent header and other page elements around pages generated by different systems.

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You mean like this:

<html>
<head>
</head>
<frameset cols="30%,*">
<frame src="page01.html">
<frame src="page02.html">
</frameset>
</html>
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