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This is kind of hard to explain. Here's an example of my HTML:

<div id="container">
    <div row="1">
    </div>
    <div row="2">
    </div>
    <div row="3">
    </div>
    <div row="4">
    </div>
    <div row="5">
    </div>
</div>

I need to basically find the last <div> in the container <div> and get the row attribute from it. This 99% of the time ends up being the biggest number, but not guaranteed to be.

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use the last-child-selector[docs] to fetch the last row, then the attr()[docs] method to get the value of the attribute.

var row = $('#container > div:last-child').attr('row');

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/TZyPT/

You may want to consider the HTML5 data- attribute for custom attributes. jQuery supports it in older browsers with the data()[docs] method.

<div id="container">
    <div data-row="1">
    </div>
    <div data-row="2">
    </div>
    <div data-row="3">
    </div>
    <div data-row="4">
    </div>
    <div data-row="5">
    </div>
</div>

var row = $('#container > div:last-child').data('row');

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/TZyPT/1/

share|improve this answer
    
Will this infinite loop if there's no inner divs? – slandau May 15 '11 at 0:42
    
@slandau Nope, it shouldn't. – alex May 15 '11 at 0:43
    
@slandau: No. jQuery methods just fail quietly when there are no matching elements. – user113716 May 15 '11 at 0:44
    
Hmm, from the jQuery documentation: "While :last matches only a single element, :last-child can match more than one: one for each parent." Maybe changing it to :last might have a slight increase in performance? Or not, since there's only one parent. Does anyone know? I'm curious now. – destiel starship May 15 '11 at 0:53
1  
@with a dot.: I think that either way, the selector engine will have to start by finding all div elements, then reducing to those with the parent #container and finally filtering down to the last one. The advantage of using :last-child over :last is that :last is not a valid CSS selector while :last-child is, so querySelectorAll will be used in browsers that support it, which will give extremely fast results compared to using a javascript based selector engine. – user113716 May 15 '11 at 0:58

jQuery has a lovely method for that:

$('div#container > div').last().attr('row')
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for another good solution using a fully valid selector. – user113716 May 15 '11 at 0:50

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